Re: Fix the Fertilty Cycle #biosolids #terrapretasanitation


Bill Knauss
 

Around 5 years ago I prepared a batch of essential microorganisms (EM) according to the instructions for making bokachi.  But instead of adding rice bran  I used fresh pecan biochar with a ph of around 8.5 and only added enough to come to the top of the liquid and then sealed it in a container.  The results were that the ph came down to around 4 in a couple of weeks. I haven't done any further experiments with EM.

Bill Knauss 

On Mon, Jan 20, 2020, 8:15 AM Kevin <kchisholm@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Hi Paul

 

What would you think about simply soaking new biochar in clean water, and draining it, to leach out the soluble alkalis?

 

Also, if you added CO2 to the “leach water” it would assist in removal of Calcium.

 

If the “leach water”  was evaporated to dryness, the leached material could be sold to other areas where soil acidity was a problem. Alternatively, “leach water” that was produced when producing biochar for use in high pH soils could be used as a quenching agent for hot biochar, that could be sold into areas with acidic soils.

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: January 20, 2020 12:14 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; eco-ag-forum@groups.io; Soils <soil-age@...>; Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Fix the Fertilty Cycle

 

David,

 

The terra preta sanitation (TPS) is interesting.  I am watching from afar, but I have a question that could make things more interesting for me.   It is about the  pH of TPS.

 

One of the “limitations” of biochar is that it tends toward being  alkaline, pH above 7.   But if it is “treated, prepared, altered” with the addition of urine (alone) or feces (alone) or both, will that make it a better soil amendment for soils that are on the alkaline side?

 

Related question:  What methods are there for lowering the pH of biochar?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

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     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Yarrow via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, January 19, 2020 8:42 PM
To: eco-ag-forum@groups.io; Soils <soil-age@...>; Biochar@groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Fix the Fertilty Cycle

 

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an extra event at Global Earth Repair Foundation next sunday.

as kinda trial balloon to see if we can sail a ship for distant shores.

the main model being offered is "Terra Preta Sanitation

based on biochar, lacto-fermentation & vermicompost:

Terra Preta Sanitation   

Author/Compiled by Dorothee Spuhler (seecon international gmbh), Robert Gensch (Xavier University)

Executive Summary

Terra preta is the name of a carbon and nutrient rich soil, which has been produced by pre-Columbian cultures by the incorporation of manure, charcoal and bones into the grounds.  Today, this concept has been rediscovered for the treatment of human faeces and household wastes (e.g. kitchen wastes). A promising application of terra preta sanitation (TPS) is the adaption of existing urine diverting toilets to replace the storage and dehydration treatment of urine and faeces. Terra preta sanitation (TPS) systems are based on a three-step process of collection (including urine diversion), lactic acid fermentation and vermicomposting.  Lacto-fermentation is an anaerobic process, but in opposition to anaerobic digestion. no gases are produced. The process thus is also odour-free, which makes it particularly interesting for in-house systems, even in urban areas. TPS has a high potential to prevent nutrient or carbon loss to the atmosphere by producing highly fertile compost (terra preta) and liquid fertilizer for agriculture.

for a green & peaceful planet,

david yarrow

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