Re: Minimal prep of biochar for gardens #garden


Paul S Anderson
 

Daniel,

 

Thanks.   Your message added a few more prospects.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2020 7:23 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Minimal prep of biochar for gardens

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Sorry, I sent by accident before I'd finished.

 

 

If you want to soak, I would try a compost tea over a store bought, just because I am cynical of what they put in. I used a KNF JADAM(they are even worse with initials than this page!) recipe.

 

They say start with rain water(no added chlorine), add a handful of sea salt(for the mineral content), a boiled and smooshed potato(for the carbs to feed microbial life), and a handful of leaf mold or good, natural, healthy soil from undisturbed, unsprayed forests(for the existing microbial life). They make a spray from it, so concoct it all in a dangling bag, like a tea bag, to be able to remove solids easily. I was burying the contents, so didn't bother.

 

I added manure, used coffee grounds and some leaves and stuff that I had on hand. Blood and bone wouldn't hurt either.

 

Start with about 1/2 a bucket of water. 3/4 fill with biochar, ensure liquid covers char, and there is space at the top. Cover(I used builders plastic held in place by occy straps), and leave in the sun. 36 hours is around the optimal time to allow the microbes to spread, and ferment to happen. Bubbles should form. Spread/bury into garden around that point. After that time oxygen will be diminishing, and microbes will die off. Bury char with liquid if you want, or water down and use it elsewhere on existing plants.

 

Burying with manure or such would still be of benefit.

 

I hope this helps. I can send the pages from the KNF book if you want.


Daniel Pidgeon

 

 

 

 

Pour 500 L (132 gal) of water in a container. Dissolve 0.5 kg (1.1 lb) of sea salt into the water. Put 1 kg (2.2 lb) of boiled potatoes, 0.5 kg (1.1 lb) of leaf mold and some rocks in a ine net bag

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Paul S Anderson <psanders@...>
Sent: Monday, 20 April 2020 4:15 AM
To: Biochar@groups.io <biochar@groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] Minimal prep of biochar for gardens

 

Dear Biochar experts on preparation of biochar,

 

I seek a minimalist approach to preparation of biochar for gardens.  Please teach me.   Shame me (gently) if necessary.   I expose my ignorance and ask for help.

 

NOTE:  If this is not an appropriate topic for the Biochar Discussion Group, please say so to the group or to me directly and then we can take discussions off-list.   But I think that messages from a few of you could be of interest to many (or be combined into some “fact sheet” that could be circulated with information about how to produce raw biochar).

 

1.  I have char.   I make char.   I can help others make char with TLUD or RoCC kilns.   But that is about as far as I go.  

2.  RAW biochar onto soils is known to not be good.   So, I want to “charge” the biochar or improve it with the easiest and least expensive ways.

3.  I do NOT have a compost pile, and not likely to have one.   I do bury some  kitchen waste (not from meat), but that is a small effort.

4.  My wife and I will not be collecting urine.

5.  The char is chunky (average half-inch dimensions).   Driving over it with my car in my driveway is not on my to-do list.

       Above is the starting point, and I suspect that there could be many folks like me (except maybe not yet making char.)

 

Options for improving the char before putting it into the garden beds;

A.   I can purchase in  bags the typical garden supplies.  

                Manure, NPK fertilizers, peat (rather not use peat), Miracle Grow, other artificial or organic plant food, or you can say what to get. 

B.  Can I just put it (which ones and in what amounts?) in a container with the biochar (plus some water)?   Just mix it in?   Let it sit for how long?

C.  Please do not send instructions to purchase commercial products with biochar in them.

 

I am not planning on having serious control plots and experimental plots for quantitative measurements, but I might have a couple  of “patches” with different applications and then hope for visual differences or notable production differences.   All of my garden plots have had vegetables or flowers for numerous years.

 

I live in central Illinois and my soils here are considered to be very good, but a bit “heavy” and clumpy when tilled with a garden fork or shovel.   So in  part I want the char to help loosen the soil.

 

Spring is sort of here.   Will want to plant soon.   I have maybe 25 gallons (5 of 5-gallon buckets, or about 100 liters) of biochar from wood.

 

Thanks in advance for any thoughts about this.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

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