Re: A question about biochar as a decontaminate #contaminate


Harry Groot
 

As a follow-on to this question and the subsequent discussion: what happens to the biochar used in these situations?  Is it left, possibly claimed as a carbon sink, but one to which the contaminate is bound, or buried?  Has there been research which shows how effective that bond is (for the life of the biochar, or not?) Can the contaminate be recovered thru another process (and is THAT worth it?)

H

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 11:43 PM d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...> wrote:
There are lots of articles about the effectiveness of biochar as a heavy metal decontaminate (China/cadmium in rice paddies; Europe/lead at brownfields; US/old mine tailings, mercury). i have three questions: (1) Is it therefore reasonable to suggest the application of biochar soil amendment to urban lawns and playing fields to lock up low level lead contamination? or (2) to suggest the addition of biochar to stormwater drain systems to lock up, for example, low-level lead contamination in drain sediment during the mixing that takes place following a storm? Finally, (3) Is it reasonable to suggest the application of biochar to decontaminate flood mud or areas once covered in flood mud?

I am sure that there are preferred feedstocks, pyrolysis temps, etc. for each contaminate type, but my question is more general. It is really, "Is there any point? Anything to gain?" or would such an exercise be a total waste of money and frivolous?

Michael Shafer


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Dr. D. Michael Shafer
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