Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Frank,

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



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Dr. D. Michael Shafer
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On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/

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