Re: Mushroom Mound update


mikethewormguy
 

On Sun, Aug 15, 2021 at 02:19 PM, Rick Wilson wrote:
Hi Mike, very impressive, thanks for the photos!  
 
Certainly having plants interact with the media should get you a better result.
 
What do rice hulls bring to your media (air porosity, acidity, etc)?  What are the advantages of bone char, relative to say a wood-based char?
 
Thanks! Rick

On Aug 15, 2021, at 4:09 AM, mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:
Rick,

As far as I can see DJ's approach is the set up of an efficient cylinder shape solid state fermenter much like the smaller version I set up to grow potato and tomatoes in this season.

Since fungi like to grow on stuff, biochar provide a support and I suspect some surface raw materials for the fungi to grow. 

The grow cylinder I made using weed barrier and 2ft tall fencing goes one step further and introduces plants, as a microbial selector tool, along with the earthworms and who ever else shows up.

Also in the tomato grow cylinder I included clay pot irrigation to provide optimal moisture for microbial and plant growth within the media horizon inside the cylinder.

The media in the cylinders includes leaf compost, worm compost, rice hulls, walnut shell char, bone char, wheat straw char, rock dusts, DE, blood meal, and a microbial additive of known's.

I also planted the tomato transplant stems 12 inches into the media since they are advantageous rooters.

The weed barrier serves 2 purposes for my setup. First, it provides air exchange. Second, it causes air pruning.

At the end of the season, I will harvest the microbial rich media from the cylinders and spread it on the soil.

Whether one uses DJ's or my approach, a weed barrier covered solid state fermenter is an easy way to produce a high activity soil additive.

my 2 cents,

Mike

<20210814_121926.jpg><20210814_121822.jpg>

 Rick,

Using the plants and clay pot irrigation provides a more focused plant approved root population of microbes.

The rice hull adds porosity and serve as a nice substrate for fungi, like Trichoderma.

We like to use bone char as a Calcium and Phosphorus source for our vegees that fruit.  Bone char will have no prions, lower heavy metals, and add some porosity.

my 2 cents

Mike

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