Date   

Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

Paul S Anderson
 

Rob,

 

I am working on a reply, but it is becoming a small document (will take a few days).   I do not want to write it for a 1-time email message.   Sorry for the delay.    

 

New discoveries and progress almost every day.   More people are getting involve, and that both takes my time AND gets more progress because of more hands on deck.   The H-frame design is released for all.   So simple to make. 

 

News note:   One RoCC kiln has already been built that this THREE barrels long.   Not built by me.   And  not even in the USA.   Some people are doing while others are watching.   All are invited to participate.   Please keep me informed of any activity and  progress and any confirmation of what has been done.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Lehmert via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 7:22 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] RoCC kiln documents available now

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul, thanks for the reply.  I floated the new description to a "small circle of friends" and I got asked about:

  1. the operating temperatures produced by the unit, and
  2. any information about the quality of the biochar. 

Also curious about the stack temperature, and whether any measurements have been done that give us an idea about what size electric generator could be driven driven by the heat. 

You're onto something good! Thanks for keeping us informed.

Rob


Biochar Extension/Outreach coordinator position

Tom Miles
 

Please share with your networks! Looks like a great opportunity.

 

Position Announcement

Program Coordinator: Biochar Extension and Outreach

Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University

Position description: The Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences at Michigan State University (MSU) is seeking a highly motivated Program Coordinator for a new biochar Extension and outreach program. The Coordinator will play a key role in building a community around biochar in Michigan and the Great Lakes region. The Coordinator will consult with a multidisciplinary team of researchers and Extension professionals to develop, conduct, and coordinate information and Extension activities about biochar. Topics may span the full range of the biochar life cycle, including feedstocks, production, characterization, application, and ecological, social, economic, and policy implications.

Biochar is an emerging technology with potential to benefit agriculture, the environment, and the economy. Biochar used as a soil amendment can help increase crop productivity, remediate degraded or contaminated land, and contribute to improving surface water quality. It can create new financial opportunities or energy savings when co-produced with bioenergy. Interest in biochar has been growing steadily in the Great Lakes region, but weak standardization for production or application in the US leaves consumers vulnerable to contradictory or misleading recommendations, while also failing to provide guidance for biochar producers that could increase their products’ effectiveness. The Program Coordinator will play a key role in improving access to regionally-relevant information about biochar and in strengthening connections across the full range of biochar stakeholder groups. The Coordinator will be supervised by Dr. Jessica Miesel and will be responsible for communicating with and reporting to the overall project team. With consultation with disciplinary experts on the project team, the Coordinator’s specific responsibilities will include:

1. Developing the content and organization for an online biochar information resource center to centralize and disseminate regionally relevant biochar information;

2. Conducting a social network analysis for the Great Lakes region to identify current biochar stakeholders, assess existing interactions, determine and prioritize stakeholder needs, and identify opportunities for developing and strengthening interactions among stakeholders (individuals and groups);

3. Developing Extension and outreach products and events to address the needs and opportunities identified from the survey and social network analysis described above; and

4. Evaluating effectiveness of all programming.

 

Required qualifications: The successful candidate will have: an earned BS degree (graduate degree preferred, or at least two years of relevant work experience) with proven experience developing outreach, educational, and/or Extension-type products and events. Knowledge and experience related to sustainability topics is strongly preferred. The successful candidate will have a track record of excellent written and oral communication skills; outstanding interpersonal skills including ability to effectively engage with a wide range of stakeholder groups and disciplinary experts; proven ability to work well independently and collaboratively; and demonstrated ability to successfully initiate, manage, and

complete quality projects. Preference will be given to candidates with prior experience in project and/or program management. A valid US driver’s license is required.

 

Location and position details: This is a part-time hourly position available for two years (averaging 19 hours weekly over the course of each year), with potential for extension depending on satisfactory performance and availability of funds. Salary is commensurate with experience. The position offers a highly flexible work schedule for outstanding applicants. The position will be based at Michigan State University in East Lansing, MI, USA. Occasional short-term travel in Michigan to meet with stakeholders is expected. Remote work may be possible and preference should be indicated in the cover letter.

 

To Apply: Apply online at https://jobs.msu.edu to position number 713836. Upload the following required documents as a single PDF: 1) a letter of interest detailing qualifications for the position and how it relates to your professional interests, 2) resume or curriculum vitae, 3) a list of 3 professional references with contact information (institution, email address, phone number), and 4) three samples of professional products (e.g. Extension article or other non-technical product on a scientific topic, educational product, website developed, etc.). Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 

Review of applications will begin 12 July 2021. Desired start date is in mid-August 2021 but flexibility may be possible and availability should be indicated in the application cover letter. Questions about the position should be directed to Dr. Miesel at mieselje@....

 

MSU is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from, and nominations of, women, persons of color, veterans, persons with disabilities and other individuals who can contribute to the intellectual diversity and cultural richness at Michigan State University.


Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

Robert Lehmert
 

Solid advice, as usual. Thanks. 


Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Paul,

I think that this is a very good and important suggestion. One of the kiln's key advantages is its mobility, but it is also a design that can be scaled. In locations where there are large quantities of chips, scale will be good. Slow loading will not. Since big chip sites will likely be fairly long-term sites, I think that it makes sense to design a simple chip/biomass drier that can tap the kiln's heat. This would reduce labor requirements, increase production, make good use of waste heat and valorize a common but awkward feedstock.

M


On Thu, Jun 17, 2021, 2:09 AM Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Paul - It looks a lot more stable — and portable. It's good that it can be moved as needed (in my case, for storage).

In an ideal world we would use the heat for something very productive. I am viewing the new design in the contest of channeling it to dry woodchip. RoCC is not suitable for chips, but they're everywhere here and a nuisance. If we just took the water out, they would be much more useful. I am thinking of a conveyer system, high enough so the RoCC can be operated and long enough to be effective with 50% wet chips, even if it ran at a deliberate speed. I wonder what a 7 foot long RoCC could dry.

You are the archetypal dedicated biochar crusader, Paul. I appreciate that.


USBI June 2021 News

Tom Miles
 

USBI Newsletter June 2021
 US Biochar Initiative Newsletter
June 2021
Having trouble viewing this newsletter?
Choose 'display all images' and 'view entire message' or download file.
US CARBON MARKETS CONTINUE TO DEVELOP

By Tom Miles, Executive Director

We are beginning to learn about the costs and benefits of carbon removal credits as more producers enter the markets. Oregon Biochar Solutions has joined Pacific Biochar and Carbo Culture in California for certification to sell carbon removal credits. Verra (VCS - Verifed Carbon Standard) is expected to develop a biochar methodology in a few months and California's Climate Action Reserve is not far behind. We hope that revenues from carbon removal credit sales can offset production costs to help make biochars more affordable to general markets.
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AND USBI RECEIVE USFS 120K EDUCATION GRANT

The U.S. Biochar Initiative (USBI) and the Nebraska Forest Service (NFS), part of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL), have received a nearly $120,000 grant through the U.S. Forest Service’s Wood Innovations Grant (WIG) program. The project will be led by USBI board member and NFS Forest Products Specialist Heather Norbert. Drawing upon the expertise of USBI's Board of Directors, UNL's educational and research capacity, and the NFS, the two-year project will develop educational resources that will promote biochar commercialization in key industry sectors. The targeted sectors include stormwater and manure management, animal feed, biochar amended compost, soil blends and growing media, landscape turf and trees, and viticulture. Funding will be used to produce and widely distribute application guidelines, fact sheets, and development roadmaps for these markets.

This is the third biochar grant awarded to the Nebraska Forest Service through the Wood Innovations program and the first in partnership with the USBI.
Seeking Education Grant Steering Committee Members

The USBI Education Committee is seeking your valuable experience as a researcher, biochar producer, or biochar user to help guide grant efforts. Steering Committee mem-bers will commit to provide advice on developing ma-terials, review publication drafts, and attend a series of
quarterly online meetings over the project's two-year period. If you have subject matter expertise in biochar production, applications and business
development in stormwater or manure management, animal feed, biochar amended compost, soil blends and growing media, landscape turf and trees, or viticulture, please consider joining this exciting initiative to promote the biochar industry!

Send your letter of interest and qualifications to USBI Education Committee Chair Heather Nobert with "Steering Committee" in the subject line.
Congratulations to USBI Board Member Heather Norbert and her team for winning the USBI WIG grant! Winning grants like these requires matching funds so we still need you to step up and show your support!
MEET A BIOCHAR PRACTITIONER

Karl Strahl, VP
Biochar Business Development
Oregon Biochar Solutions
Oregon Biochar Solutions (OBS) is a subsidiary of Biomass One, a 30 MW biomass power plant in White City, Oregon, that produces biochar and electric power.

Q You are early in your career. How did you choose biochar as your focus?

A Karl – I had originally planned to get a degree in business, but I had a great professor in college who encouraged me to pursue environmental science, and I found that I really enjoyed it. After graduating with a degree in environmental science and communications, I worked for Solar City in New York selling solar panels. We saturated the market, covering 15% of the roof space, so it was time to take on another challenge. A family mem-
Karl Strahl, VP Biochar Business Development
ber recommended Oregon Biochar Solutions. I could quickly see that, unlike solar, there was no real market yet for biochar, so it was risky, but I like a challenge.

Q What are you doing to develop markets for biochar?

A Currently, I'm looking at biochar as a substitute for products that already have a market, such as activated carbon for water filtration, or various soil conditioners used in growing media. We can make granular and powdered biochar that work as well as or better than other materials in these applica-tions and compete on price. We can produce 3500-4000 tons of biochar year, so we are looking at bulk commodity markets.

Q What about carbon markets? Do you see any potential there?

A We are in the process of getting our biochar listed on the Puro Earth carbon removal trading platform. It’s a complicated process and we are very happy to be getting help from GECA Environnement in Canada. There are lots of details to address and they specialize in this.

Q How does Biomass One balance the power output of the plant with biochar production? Is there a significant tradeoff? And does the company
make most of its income as a power plant or as a biochar production plant?

A Producing biochar with our plant has no impact on the power output of the plant. It requires a very slight increase in the amount of biomass fuel we
use. The largest share of our revenue comes from electricity sales, followed by tipping fees for our greenwaste drop-off service. Biochar and our soil blending yard make up the last piece of the reve- nue stream. But even though we make money selling electricity, it makes more sense to think of Biomass One as a wood waste recycling plant that recovers value from waste in the form of electricity and biochar.

Q What is one change to existing business conditions that would help significantly grow biochar markets?

A To really move biochar to where it needs to go, we need incentives to help farmers repair the land and rebuild their soil. We are experiencing extreme land degradation and losing topsoil. Environmental science tells us we need to help farmers implement regenerative practices, including biochar. A federal-scale incentive will be required to make this happen. Above all, it’s a matter of food security now and for the future. 

Visit chardirect.com to purchase Oregon Biochar Solutions' bulk biochar or to order a sample.
USBI YouTube Channel

Find free educational videos on a ton of topics including current articles, books, podcasts, and more. Click below and share the link with your fellow practitioners!
USBI Learning Center

All resources on the Biochar Learning Center are tagged and searchable by topic and media type. Click below.
ANNOUNCEMENTS AND OPPORTUNITIES
----- Microsoft $1 Billion Dollar Climate Innovation Funding
Funding is available over the the next four years. See Microsoft awardee information and the funding inquiry form here.
----- NRCS State Conservation Innovation Grants Available -----
Due June 2021
Check here to see if there are Natural Resource Conservation Service Conservation Innovation Grants available in your state and get contact information. Grant size ranges from $100K TO $317M.
----- New, Enhanced USBI North American Biochar Directory -----
Join the Directory - Get your free biochar listing now!
USBI's new searchable directory includes biochar suppliers, equipment manufacturers, researchers, consultants and organizations.

Help customers find your business.

Find out who needs your services.

Discover organizations that are working on biochar solutions.

Join the directory and use it to connect with the North American biochar network.

Make it easier for others to find out about your biochar company or project. Be sure to fill out as much as you can about your sector, products, applications, technology, and the scale of your operations.

Together we are putting the world's carbon budget back in the black and building the most comprehensive biochar directory for the US market!

Once you enter your information, you will be taken to a donation page. We ask for a suggested contribution of $25 annually for your directory listing. Please give more if you can afford it. Your contribution helps to keep the USBI website alive and growing!

Add your USBI listing - HERE. After review, your listing will be published in the USBI Biochar Directory.
ROLLING OUT THE GREEN CARPET FOR
NEW USBI DIRECTORY MEMBERS

Welcome to USBI'S newest directory members - Soil Reef, LLC, Aries Clean Technologies, and Renewable Biochar, LLC! We are glad that others in the biochar community now know about you!
● - ● - ●

BIOCHAR EVENTS CALENDAR

● - ● - ●


Send your events to cgribley@...
BIOCHAR NEWSLINKS
Boulder Receives Grant for Biochar Work. The City of Boulder obtained a $100,000 grant from the Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance Game Changer Fund to support its bioenergy-biochar work. Boulder must pay to dispose of more than 1,000 tons of woody biomass "waste" that the city generates. The project aims to capture and convert this material into biochar which can be used in urban forestry expansion and storm water treatment objectives. The heat emitted in production can be used to displace natural gas use.
“Thinning of forests, conversion of the removed wood to biochar and burial of the biochar in forest soils is a way to bring new jobs to forested rural areas while allowing forests to play a bigger role in keeping carbon out of the atmosphere and thus fighting climate change,” said Jonathan Overpeck, dean of the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability.
People Prefer 'Natural' Strategies to Reduce Atmospheric Carbon. Across the political spectrum, people support nature-based strategies like soil carbon sequestration with biochar over high-tech approaches like capturing CO2
and pumping the gas into underground storage. Bipartisan
support for nature-based strategies will be needed.

Utility Clears Power Lines for Fire Prevention and Forest Health. While clearing trees away from power lines is a routine mainte- nance practice, Washington's Orcas Power & Light Cooperative is now working with the CCC to turn the woody debris into biochar. The biochar created is used on-site as a soil amendment for greater forest health.
Living on Earth Host Casey Troost Speaks to the Benefits of Biochar for Retaining Water in Soil During Drought. “Farmers in certain parts of Nebraska can save nearly 40% of irrigated water by incorporating biochar into their sandy soils. And water isn’t the only benefit. The little pores in biochar also absorb atmospheric carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen, and other nutrients, and store them for plants to use. Just think - biochar is like a little lunch box and water bottle combined!”

California Drought Coping Tips Include Biochar. Tip #4: Planting with things like mulch or biochar, which can be bought at your local nursery, help prevent evaporation and thus require less water.

Biochar to Treat Island Wastewater. Ridge to Reefs is partnering with Sunshine Vetiver Solutions on three strategies for purifying the wastewater — planting vetiver grass and native plants, using bioreactor and biochar filtration technology and testing a modified soil aquifer treatment basin that also uses biochar.

Biochar Takes On Another Algae-Filled Pond. Almy Pond in Newport has recorded some of the highest measured phosphorus levels of any pond in Rhode Island. Almy Watershed Protectors has plans to run a filtration pilot project on the pond using biochar socks placed on the pond’s edge to help eliminate incoming contaminants.

Wyoming Startup Accelerator Gives Boost to Biochar Business. Laramie’s High Plains Biochar is getting some business strategy help to develop its carbon-negative biotech technology. The company is a few months out from the fundraising phase, and they are looking for partners to help put carbon back in the ground. 

Frontline Bioenergy’s Iowa Pyrolysis Project Progresses. The Stine pyrolysis project, a collaboration between Stine Seed Farms and Frontline BioEnergy, will transform biomass into biochar and bio-oil. Stine Seed Farms is currently installing the 9-module pyrolysis plant equipment at its site. “This project will bolster Iowa’s farming industry by creating a value-added market for corn stover and other unused biomass,” said Harry Stine, Stine’s CEO.
➤ East Millinocket Biochar Production Plant Gets $800K Leg-Up. Maine's Finance Authority has approved an $800,000 FAME Direct Loan to Standard Biocarbon Corp. to help pay for equipment for the company's biochar operation at the former East Millinocket mill, pending approval of financing from other agencies.

--------------------- promotional section ---------------------

See your ad here and reach over 2500 biochar readers! Contact admin@....
Proceeds go to the International Biochar Initiative
Visit Biochar-us.org for more information.


Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

Hugh McLaughlin
 

Robert and any others who make your own biochar,

Go to Harbor Freight and buy a laser thermometer - get the highest range available if there is a choice - and measure your own temperatures. Teach yourself how your apparatus operates and what kind of flame intensity corresponds to what kind of temperatures.

As for biochar quality, again, you have to measure your material and learn from the results. The Baseline Biochar Metrics (google on web) or Chapter 8 of "The Biochar Revolution" (attached, since I wrote it) will teach you how to tell biochar quality. Yes, you will have to get your hands dirty, but it is biochar....

Hugh McLaughlin

On Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 8:21:34 PM EDT, Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert@...> wrote:


Paul, thanks for the reply.  I floated the new description to a "small circle of friends" and I got asked about:

  1. the operating temperatures produced by the unit, and
  2. any information about the quality of the biochar. 
Also curious about the stack temperature, and whether any measurements have been done that give us an idea about what size electric generator could be driven driven by the heat. 

You're onto something good! Thanks for keeping us informed.

Rob


Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

Robert Lehmert
 

Paul, thanks for the reply.  I floated the new description to a "small circle of friends" and I got asked about:

  1. the operating temperatures produced by the unit, and
  2. any information about the quality of the biochar. 
Also curious about the stack temperature, and whether any measurements have been done that give us an idea about what size electric generator could be driven driven by the heat. 

You're onto something good! Thanks for keeping us informed.

Rob


Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

Paul S Anderson
 

Rob,

 

We have learned (in Kenya) that the RoCC kiln can operate successfully with small size biomass.   Was done with rice husks, so wood chips is an easier fuel.   The trick is in slow feeding.   So there  could be added expense for the feeding mechanism (auger, vibrator, screen, etc.) unless labor is  real inexpensive.   Just a matter of budget and who wants it done.

 

My priorities are for the easier fuels and to make much biochar.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Lehmert via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 2:10 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] RoCC kiln documents available now

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Hi Paul - It looks a lot more stable — and portable. It's good that it can be moved as needed (in my case, for storage).

In an ideal world we would use the heat for something very productive. I am viewing the new design in the contest of channeling it to dry woodchip. RoCC is not suitable for chips, but they're everywhere here and a nuisance. If we just took the water out, they would be much more useful. I am thinking of a conveyer system, high enough so the RoCC can be operated and long enough to be effective with 50% wet chips, even if it ran at a deliberate speed. I wonder what a 7 foot long RoCC could dry.

You are the archetypal dedicated biochar crusader, Paul. I appreciate that.


Re: RoCC kiln documents available now

Robert Lehmert
 

Hi Paul - It looks a lot more stable — and portable. It's good that it can be moved as needed (in my case, for storage).

In an ideal world we would use the heat for something very productive. I am viewing the new design in the contest of channeling it to dry woodchip. RoCC is not suitable for chips, but they're everywhere here and a nuisance. If we just took the water out, they would be much more useful. I am thinking of a conveyer system, high enough so the RoCC can be operated and long enough to be effective with 50% wet chips, even if it ran at a deliberate speed. I wonder what a 7 foot long RoCC could dry.

You are the archetypal dedicated biochar crusader, Paul. I appreciate that.


Re: Biochar into saline-impacted soil

Robert Lehmert
 

Hello 

Attached:   PDF of full report  "Biochar application for remediation of sales-affected soils". 


RoCC kiln documents available now

Paul S Anderson
 

Biochar folks,

The message below has been posted to the Biochar Crusaders discussion group on WhatsApp:

 

As promised, I am making available the slide deck (slightly edited) of my presentation  last Wednesday to Biochar Crusaders.   I am also delivering a new document entitled    The "H-Frame" Design of RoCC Pyrolytic Kilns   that discusses actual materials, measurements and help for making the H-Frame RoCC kilns in barrel size (and  larger).

 

Both documents are available at my website   www.woodgas.energy/resources    .   Then can be placed at the Crusaders website by Dr. Mehta, but when I do updates, the new material will be at my website and a notification will be given of availability.   Looking forward to RoCC kiln efforts in India and in other countries.

 

^^^^^^^^^^^

I expect to fix minor errors in the  coming week (slide 3 did not get copied and the video from Mexico does not play).   But development is accelerating, with new experiences every week and an expanding list of countries with RoCC kiln activities (currently in Kenya, India, Mexico, South Africa, USA, and close in  Australia).  

 

The advent of the H-Frame and the specifics of its fabrication at barrel size will be beneficial.  If you are getting started with RoCC kilns,  please contact me for further free assistance.  

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Re: Biochar from Digestive from an anaerobic digester

Geoff Thomas
 

Rick, sorry, - I got the numbers wrong - https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=Gobar+Gas,+how+many+in+India%3F&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
Two Million, plus more in surrounding nations as well.

The concept was introduced by Ghandi, a formidable person by any account, Gobar Gas is also described by other names, - methane plants, biogas plants - several other names, and the Chinese are into it big time also, although considerably behind India.
"There are 18,000 small biogas plants with total volume 700,000m³ and 8576 large biogas plants built on husbandry farms. Central government has invested in Eco-campus building in Hebei, Fujian, Shanxi, Hubei, Guangxi, Hainan, Chongqing, Sichuan, Yunnan and Shaanxi provinces.”
Of course, not many Chinese plants would own up to being Gobar, as it is Indian, with all that nationalist bulshit,, having looked at that stuff a few years ago I recall the Chinese were a significant percentage of the Indian, and who knows where they have both got to now?

I have commented on this a few times on this site, eg for seaweed, but nationalistic Americans can’t accept that other countries all around our planet are doing very interesting things also, - and on an enormous scale as well.

The thing with the basic gobar gas plant is that it is sooo simple, - all the waste of the village goes into this big round tank, the which has a wall across the middle, level with the top, the which may have some sort of curtain hanging down.
The wall does not go to the bottom of the tank, so the incoming organic matter goes down one side, then under the wall, then up the other side, giving it time to give up it’s methane and break down anaerobicaly.
The “Lid”, - the upturned saucer, seals off the tank from outside and the two walls, - not so important, - methane is methane after all, so the lid goes up and down according to how much gas is being produced.
A bit like the old gas cylinders in the early industrial revolution, - can’t remember the name, or who copied who.
So, the edge of the lid rubs aginst the wall of the tank sas it goes up and down, - and has a lip to catch any gases, and as the gas inside increases in pressure, the lid rises higher so is easy to pipe off to run the Community cooking stove and a light, - brings the community together to share dinner and plan the future.
The feed in aperture is higher than the run off aperture so the raw material comes in on one side of the tank and on the other side of the tank is the exit aperture, so the treated material then goes out to the fields, although both are underwater, so no gas is lost.
Look up on the Internet, "Gobar Gas," there is a wealth of diagrams and versions.

I too would be interested to hear what happens with the old solids that settle on the bottom, - eventually they must clear them as otherwise the space under the wall would close and no water could flow.
Knowing the Indian Indians, they would certainly not waste it.
Cheers,
Geoff.

On 15 Jun 2021, at 3:41 pm, Geoff Thomas <wind@iig.com.au> wrote:

Hi Rick, there are tens of thousands of such units, - eg the Gobar gas, etc, in India, they, to my knowledge, dilute the liquid digestate with water, "then carry/pipe it out to their fields”.
The Solids component no-one talked of as the whole concept was new then.
The gas burned for community stove and light.

Many years have passed, no doubt the solids have contined to build up, but usually those digesters had an upside down saucer, concrete lid, the which could be removed, - as it was designed to rise and fall due to gas concentration, and applied pressure to same.

I am sure that India contains a vast treasury of data on the outputs of their community digesters, but I have always assumed that the solids were beneficial to the soil also.

Then again, too much of anything can turn out to be too much of a good thing, - consider the you beaut cow poo etc. from factory farming, - a wonderful resource if mixed with charcoal to create biochar, but otherwise a curse for the famers.

Sorry, not much help?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 15 Jun 2021, at 3:00 pm, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello group, does anyone have knowledge-experience using biochar produced from Anaerobic digestion digestate?

My understanding is that neat digestate is not very helpful to soils.

Are the specific applications, soils, and outside soils where the material has value in use?

Thanks,
Rick









Re: Biochar from Digestive from an anaerobic digester

Ove TG
 

Hi

Depends on the digestive, but biochar should help whatever if they are applied together.

Bes

Ove
Ove Lerdahl, CEO
ove@tilapiagroup.com
Phone + 47 48241087

15. jun. 2021 kl. 07:00 skrev Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io>:

Hello group, does anyone have knowledge-experience using biochar produced from Anaerobic digestion digestate?

My understanding is that neat digestate is not very helpful to soils.

Are the specific applications, soils, and outside soils where the material has value in use?

Thanks,
Rick







Re: Biochar from Digestive from an anaerobic digester

Rick Wilson
 

Thanks Geoff that is helpful, I’ve only heard that digestate is problematic as a compost.

The digestate we are dealing with comes from waste water treatment plants - human waste, so unfortunately its not considered organic.

I’m wondering what the biochar produced from this material - looks like.

Rick

On Jun 14, 2021, at 10:41 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@iig.com.au> wrote:

Hi Rick, there are tens of thousands of such units, - eg the Gobar gas, etc, in India, they, to my knowledge, dilute the liquid digestate with water, "then carry/pipe it out to their fields”.
The Solids component no-one talked of as the whole concept was new then.
The gas burned for community stove and light.

Many years have passed, no doubt the solids have contined to build up, but usually those digesters had an upside down saucer, concrete lid, the which could be removed, - as it was designed to rise and fall due to gas concentration, and applied pressure to same.

I am sure that India contains a vast treasury of data on the outputs of their community digesters, but I have always assumed that the solids were beneficial to the soil also.

Then again, too much of anything can turn out to be too much of a good thing, - consider the you beaut cow poo etc. from factory farming, - a wonderful resource if mixed with charcoal to create biochar, but otherwise a curse for the famers.

Sorry, not much help?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 15 Jun 2021, at 3:00 pm, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello group, does anyone have knowledge-experience using biochar produced from Anaerobic digestion digestate?

My understanding is that neat digestate is not very helpful to soils.

Are the specific applications, soils, and outside soils where the material has value in use?

Thanks,
Rick











Re: Biochar from Digestive from an anaerobic digester

Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Rick, there are tens of thousands of such units, - eg the Gobar gas, etc, in India, they, to my knowledge, dilute the liquid digestate with water, "then carry/pipe it out to their fields”.
The Solids component no-one talked of as the whole concept was new then.
The gas burned for community stove and light.

Many years have passed, no doubt the solids have contined to build up, but usually those digesters had an upside down saucer, concrete lid, the which could be removed, - as it was designed to rise and fall due to gas concentration, and applied pressure to same.

I am sure that India contains a vast treasury of data on the outputs of their community digesters, but I have always assumed that the solids were beneficial to the soil also.

Then again, too much of anything can turn out to be too much of a good thing, - consider the you beaut cow poo etc. from factory farming, - a wonderful resource if mixed with charcoal to create biochar, but otherwise a curse for the famers.

Sorry, not much help?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 15 Jun 2021, at 3:00 pm, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello group, does anyone have knowledge-experience using biochar produced from Anaerobic digestion digestate?

My understanding is that neat digestate is not very helpful to soils.

Are the specific applications, soils, and outside soils where the material has value in use?

Thanks,
Rick







Biochar from Digestive from an anaerobic digester

Rick Wilson
 

Hello group, does anyone have knowledge-experience using biochar produced from Anaerobic digestion digestate?

My understanding is that neat digestate is not very helpful to soils.

Are the specific applications, soils, and outside soils where the material has value in use?

Thanks,
Rick


Re: Biochar into saline-impacted soil

Rick Wilson
 

Paul, please see that attached Ph.D. Thesis.  Biochar and compost work really well together remediating sodic soils.
The biochar opens the soil porosity so water can move through it, the Calcium and Magnesium from the compost displace sodium.

I’ve used this Rx many times and it works well.

Rick


On Jun 12, 2021, at 12:48 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Try Google scholar saline soil biochar

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

On Jun 12, 2021, at 12:30 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:


Please send any comments, knowledge or links concerning if and how biochar can be of benefit into soils that have been impacted by salt water intrusions.   This is a real issue in the  lower parts of the Ganges River delta when cyclones bring sea water onto agricultural land.   It is said that 2 or 3 years are normally needed before it can be cultivated again.   (rain water helps wash out the salt over time.)
 
Will biochar benefit such soils?
 
Thanks,
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources   
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 


July 20, 2021 You're invited to Biochar - insights into challenges, benefits &amp; applications

Tom Miles
 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/biochar-insights-into-challenges-benefits-applications-tickets-157769273143?utm-campaign=social%2Cemail&utm-content=attendeeshare&utm-medium=discovery&utm-source=strongmail&utm-term=listing

During this session, gain an insight about the part this multi-purpose material can play in decarbonising rural and urban environments.

Date and time

Tue, 20 July 2021

02:00 – 03:00 PDT

Add to calendar

 

About this event

 

Biochar, a sustainable form of charcoal made from organic waste, offers a wide variety of benefits and uses including carbon capture, water treatment, soil improvement, odour control and industrial applications.

 

During this session, gain an insight from NetZero Week partner, the Energy & Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI) at Aston University, about the part this multi-purpose material can play in decarbonising rural and urban environments.

 

Agenda topics:

• Feedstocks

• Production process & technologies

• Market

• Properties, benefits & applications

• Industrial plants

• Case studies

• Q&A

 

Presenters:

Vitor Furlong, Knowledge Exchange Associate – Biochemical Processes, Energy & Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI), Aston University

João Santos, Knowledge Exchange Associate – Thermal Processes, Energy & Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI), Aston University

 

Who should attend:

Anaerobic Digestion (AD) industry

Arboretums & Arborologists

Biochar Manufacturers

Environmental Industry

Estate Managers

Foresters

Horticulturists & Nurseries

Landscapers & Gardening Companies

Property Developers

Rural Businesses

Soil & Compost Companies

Sustainability Consultants

Water Treatment Companies

Wood Industry

 


EURONEWS.GREEN - How is the €3 billion biochar industry transforming green energy in Sweden?

Andrew Chapeskie
 

Link:  https://www.euronews.com/green/2021/06/14/how-is-the-3-billion-biochar-industry-transforming-green-energy-sweden

From the article: "Producing biochar from organic waste could offset the carbon footprint of the global transport sector"


Frontline BioEnergy's Iowa pyrolysis project progresses

Tom Miles
 

Congratulations to Frontline energy for their progress on commercializing Authothermal Pyrolysis with a biochar co-product.



JUN 11, 2021

Frontline BioEnergy’s Iowa pyrolysis project progresses

 

 

On 8 June, Frontline BioEnergy delivered the final module of the Stine pyrolysis plant to the project site in Redfield, Iowa.

 

The Stine pyrolysis project, a collaboration between Stine Seed Farms and Frontline BioEnergy, will transform biomass into biochar and bio-oil. Frontline took the project from conception through detailed engineering and fabrication.

 

Work on the 9-module pyrolysis plant took place at Frontline’s headquarters in Nevada, Iowa. Stine Seed Farms is currently installing the equipment at its site. The two companies will partner to commission and start up the plant this summer.

 

“This project will bolster Iowa’s farming industry by creating a value-added market for corn stover and other unused biomass,” said Harry Stine, Stine’s CEO.

 

“This pyrolysis process can convert relatively unused agricultural by-products into a biochar soil amendment that improves nutrient and moisture utilization in the soil and will allow farmers to realize greater returns on their crops.” https://www.bioenergy-news.com/news/frontline-bioenergys-iowa-pyrolysis-project-progresses/





 

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