Date   

Re: Beyond the trough

Stephen Joseph
 

Depends on how wet it is and how strong a fire you have but normally you will get some baking at the interface and condensation of wood smoke on the clay particles.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 9:26 AM mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 


We live in the land of clay......   If I dig a trench in our general soil to make biochar than  the bottom of the trench will be clay.

What can I expect to happen to that clay after I have built a biochar making fire on top of it ?

Thanks.....

Mike



Re: Beyond the trough

David Yarrow
 

well, not now, but if i dredge my dim & ancient memories to when i lived in northern new mexico in early70s, when i learned to make earthenware pottery the way pueblo & navajo potters do -- which is in a pit kiln, with cow pies for fuel.  burns really hot and makes nice earthenware.  some pueblo potters made above-ground beehive kilns from adobe, but i knew very little of them, remember less.  i remember they had techniques to choke their kiln fire into a reducing flame, which coated the pottery with carbon.  the black pueblo pottery was popular with tourists to earn premium prices.  probably the reducing kiln fire also made a bit of manure biochar, but back then, who knew to notice or comment?  not me. 
~david

On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 6:10 PM mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

Exactly.....that is what I am curious about.........?


Re: Beyond the trough

mikethewormguy
 

Exactly.....that is what I am curious about.........?


Re: Beyond the trough

David Yarrow
 

pottery?


On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 2:27 PM mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 


We live in the land of clay......   If I dig a trench in our general soil to make biochar than  the bottom of the trench will be clay.

What can I expect to happen to that clay after I have built a biochar making fire on top of it ?

Thanks.....

Mike



Re: Beyond the trough

mikethewormguy
 


We live in the land of clay......   If I dig a trench in our general soil to make biochar than  the bottom of the trench will be clay.

What can I expect to happen to that clay after I have built a biochar making fire on top of it ?

Thanks.....

Mike



Living Soil Film Released!

Kim Chaffee
 

Hello All,

Last month I attended a Soil Health Institute (SHI) conference on “The Connections Between Soil Health and Human Health" in Washington, DC.  There was no mention of biochar among the dozens of experts on their various panels.  I brought biochar up at the Q&A session at the end of the conference.  

This group gets substantial funding from Big Ag groups.  SHI just came out with a 60 minute film called Living Soil.  I haven’t had time to watch it, but thought you should know about it.  There is a link to the film in this email.  It’s free.  

Kim Chaffee




Begin forwarded message:

From: Soil Health Institute <info@...>
Subject: Living Soil Film Released!
Date: November 15, 2018 at 9:15:25 AM EST
Reply-To: Soil Health Institute <info@...>

View this email in your browser

Living Soil Film Released!


Today, the Soil Health Institute released Living Soil, a 60-minute documentary about soil health featuring innovative farmers and soil health experts from throughout the U.S. The film is freely available to download and stream at www.livingsoilfilm.com. Accompanying lesson plans for college and high school students will be available on World Soil Day on December 5th.  A link to the full press release can be found here
Living Soil: A Documentary for All of Us
Our soils support 95 percent of all food production, and by 2060, they will be asked to give us as much food as we have consumed in the last 500 years. They filter our water. They are one of our most cost-effective reservoirs for sequestering carbon. They are our foundation for biodiversity. And they are vibrantly alive, teeming with 10,000 pounds of biological life in every acre. Yet in the last 150 years, we’ve lost half of the basic building block that makes soil productive. The societal and environmental costs of soil loss and degradation in the United States alone are now estimated to be as high as $85 billion every single year. Like any relationship, our living soil needs our tenderness. It’s time we changed everything we thought we knew about soil. Let’s make this the century of living soil.

This documentary was directed by Chelsea Myers and Tiny Attic Productions based in Columbia, Missouri, and produced by the Soil Health Institute through the generous support of The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation.

A special thanks to Dawn Bentley, Brian Berns, Keith Berns, Bill Buckner, Mimo Davis, Dan DeSutter, Miranda Duschak, James “Ooker” Eskridge, Barry Fisher, Liz Graznak, Steve Groff, Jerry Hatfield, Trey Hill, Larkin Martin, Bianca Moebius-Clune, Jesse Sanchez, Larry Thompson, John Wiebold, Kristen Veum, Kevin Mathein, Ben Harris, Tim Pilcher, Josh Wright, Haley Myers, Rob Myers and Josh Oxenhandler. 
Copyright © 2018 Soil Health Institute, All rights reserved. 
You are receiving this email as a friend of the Soil Health Institute. 

Our mailing address is: 
Soil Health Institute
2803 Slater Rd.
Suite 115
Morrisville, North Carolina  27560

Add us to your address book


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. 




Re: Beyond the trough

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Michael

Quench with clay compost manure minerals and make a biochar mineral  complex.  Gordon is getting great results doing this with rice.

Regards
Stephen

On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 8:31 PM 'd.michael.shafer@...' d.michael.shafer@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

At Warm Heart, we love the trough (flame cap, whatever). After all, Karl Frogner developed and tested it here and Gordon Hirst drew it up.

But out here, reality is a big deal. Mountain farmers complained that a trough is too expensive and too heavy - and really requires water to quench.

What to do?

Regress.

The new trough is a short trench in the ground sized so that it can be covered with a cut open and flattened 200 l. drum.

You use the trench exactly as you would a trough, but when it is full you do not quench. Instead, you cover the trench with the flattened drum and seal the edges with dirt from the hole. Because smothering takes hours, you then move on to the next trench.

Cost reduction? About 90%. Weight reduction? About 95%. Water hauling reduction? 100%.

Pretty cool.

It's not elegant, but then, who's looking?

Michael Shafer


Re: Beyond the trough

mikethewormguy
 

Michael,

Thanks for the posting on the soil pit biochar making method....

I am thinking of trying it next season in combination with our current soil improvement process.  

You may find our current soil improvement process of interest.....

1. fermenting our pre-consumption food residue in 5 gallon buckets to make food silage over a 2-10 month period.... ( we create around 25 five gallon buckets of food silage annually)

2.choose a garden area that will remain dormant for next season,,,

3. in the dormant area, we dig trenches and place the food silage in the trench and cover with the excavated soil....

4. place pallet based compost bins to cover  the area where the food silage has been dug in.....

5. during the next season the compost bins are filled with plant biomass and such.....

6. at the end of the season, a new dormant area is identified, the food silage in dug in, the compost bins are moved to the 'new' dormant area and the process is started again...NOTE......any plant material left over in the compost bins get moved as well....(sourdough effect)......

The above approach allows for the soil to be improved within at least 24 inches of the soil horizon.   The food silage trenches become defacto worm bins being fed by both the food silage and the leachate from the compost bin biomass and populated by local earthworms.......

I could see the benefit of making the soil pit biochar, as a new first step,  in the dormant area.  The biochar would be left in the trench and the food silage added on top...  The compost bin placement step would be the same...

The biochar in the trench would become enriched and enlivened by the food silage and compost bin leachate.......      This would make happy soil more happy........

Thanks again for the charmin idea......!

my 2 cents,

Mike



Re: Beyond the trough

Geoff Thomas
 

Good stuff, Michael, I can see how your reasoning would appeal to the cow cockies in australia, (small farms) beset by drought, and hardly able to make ends meet, - in a discussion I am involved in, I am advancing the argument, "If the Farmers of Australia, 2% of the workforce, would feed their cattle 330mg of charcoal/day, - which would make their cattle more healthy and productive and the soil better to retain moisture, they would be greenhouse neutral, but as the charcoal mainly stops Methane production, - a far more virulent greenhouse gas, their contribution would advance to 8%, so greenhouse positive, *4 and that charcoal, as it has then become Biochar, and buried by the dung beetles in the soil would attract more carbon and heal the soil, bringing amazing exponential benefits. - Thing is, to encourage the farmers to so do. - Carbon sequestration payment?
- They would all have 200 litre drums, many could make the thing fit, most could upscale once they were sure it worked.
But I am talking to poor farmers, - the change can probably only happen from the bottom up, nothing more bottom than a pit with a cheap lid.
Thanking You.

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 15 Nov 2018, at 7:12 pm, 'd.michael.shafer@...' d.michael.shafer@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:


At Warm Heart, we love the trough (flame cap, whatever). After all, Karl Frogner developed and tested it here and Gordon Hirst drew it up.

But out here, reality is a big deal. Mountain farmers complained that a trough is too expensive and too heavy - and really requires water to quench.

What to do?

Regress.

The new trough is a short trench in the ground sized so that it can be covered with a cut open and flattened 200 l. drum.

You use the trench exactly as you would a trough, but when it is full you do not quench. Instead, you cover the trench with the flattened drum and seal the edges with dirt from the hole. Because smothering takes hours, you then move on to the next trench.

Cost reduc tion? About 90%. Weight reduction? About 95%. Water hauling reduction? 100%.

Pretty cool.

It's not elegant, but then, who's looking?

Michael Shafer



Beyond the trough

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

At Warm Heart, we love the trough (flame cap, whatever). After all, Karl Frogner developed and tested it here and Gordon Hirst drew it up.

But out here, reality is a big deal. Mountain farmers complained that a trough is too expensive and too heavy - and really requires water to quench.

What to do?

Regress.

The new trough is a short trench in the ground sized so that it can be covered with a cut open and flattened 200 l. drum.

You use the trench exactly as you would a trough, but when it is full you do not quench. Instead, you cover the trench with the flattened drum and seal the edges with dirt from the hole. Because smothering takes hours, you then move on to the next trench.

Cost reduction? About 90%. Weight reduction? About 95%. Water hauling reduction? 100%.

Pretty cool.

It's not elegant, but then, who's looking?

Michael Shafer


Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compo st Program: NY Times

Anand Karve <adkarve@...>
 

Waste food can be used for producing methane. Yours Karve


On Tue 13 Nov, 2018, 09:42 mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@... wrote:
 

Kim,


The short answer.......create a market for food residue compost before creating capacity to make it.

Market creation......As a way to improve urban storm water management, one could propose to increase the Soil Organic Matter (SOM) content in every green space in and around  the city to greater than 15%....    Increasing the SOM also increases water holding capacity and results in less runoff.......    Start with Central Park.......

Also change the language used from waste to resource....   Words have power.....

my 2 cents......

Mike





Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times

Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

Totally fully unconditionally agree !!!



Da: biochar@yahoogroups.com <biochar@yahoogroups.com>
Inviato: giovedì 15 novembre 2018 09:02
A: biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>; Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net>
Oggetto: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times





Kathy,



This reminds me of one of the low hanging fruits of the "market pull" world.



Every village, town and city I know of has a public works department of some sort responsible for collecting dead branches and trees. These are normally chipped and often landfilled. According to the most recent Parks Department data I could find, NYC, for example, landfills tons annually at the cost of millions of dollars.



Since all of the collection costs are already incurred, this situation offers an ideal opportunity to convert waste to biochar. The biochar can then be used on parks and playing fields. The elimination of landfill costs and the opportunity to cut fertilizer and watering costs should substantially offset any production and handling costs.



Here, it seems to me, is a largely unproblematic way to incorporate biochar in a big way and to demonstrate its virtues.



This is not a situation that requires expensive equipment and quality control. In many places, simple TLUDs employing the homeless and unemployed would do the job.



M

On Wed, Nov 14, 2018, 3:02 AM kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> [biochar] <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



[Attachment(s) from kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> included below]

Next steps in my opinion would be to find someone that has the bandwidth, interest and expertise to focus on this. Most likely that would be someone that will earn some money from it either by consulting or selling product (or technology) to them eventually. I don’t know any biochar experts in NYC to recommend. [NYC is too far from me, the scope too big and too long-term for me to take it on - sorry]. If someone does identify any individuals that are interested in biochar education from NY State, I can add them to my ever growing list of folks that I keep informed about biochar happenings (this is only for NYS – otherwise keeping a list would overwhelm me!).



Attached is a picture of the Biomass Controls <https://www.biomasscontrols.com/> unit at RIT which I took a few months ago. They are doing different small scale research projects at the moment. It’s not really public at this stage as they are still getting to know the equipment and identifying different biomass sources to carbonize & characterize. Dr. Tom Trabold gave a talk about some of their previous research at the 2018 US Biochar Conference. You can find the paper on that work here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864 <https://www..sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864> . This was a joint collaboration project with RIT, Cornell & Ithaka. I assume Tom or one of his students will be at next year’s conference and can add more about their efforts.



Cheers

Kathleen







Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: <https://www.biochar-journal.org/en> https://www.biochar-journal.org/en



New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: <http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en> http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en

Biochar blogging at: <http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/> http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



From: Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> >
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:59 PM
To: Draper Kathleen <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> >
Cc: Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net <mailto:rongretlarson@comcast.net> >; biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com> >
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Thanks, Kathleen, Ron, Mike et al. These are all good builds on this topic. What would be a specific action item or two for moving this forward with the NYC folks? Also, Kathleen, do you have any information on the Biomass Controls unit and project at RIT? Thanks again.



Kim









On Nov 13, 2018, at 12:36 PM, <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> > <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> > wrote:



Hi Kim et al –

I’m actually in discussions with some folks about piloting something like this including biochar (of course!) in Western NY. We are in the early planning stages but if it goes well we hope to be a demo site for others in NYS. There are (supposedly) regulations coming down in the next few years to restrict organics to landfill so there is a lot of attention being paid to alternatives at the moment. The Rochester Institute of Technology is at the forefront of educating policy makers about the benefits of thermochemical conversion. They will be hosting a seminar in March on food waste alternatives and will be showing off their Biomass Controls unit which they are currently using to carbonize different types of food waste.



Cheers

Kathleen





<image001.jpg>

Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: <https://www.biochar-journal.org/en> https://www.biochar-journal.org/en



New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: <http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en> http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en

Biochar blogging at: <http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/> http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



From: Ronal W. Larson < <mailto:rongretlarson@comcast.net> rongretlarson@comcast.net>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:10 PM
To: biochar < <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com> biochar@yahoogroups.com>; Kim Chaffee < <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>; Kathleen Draper < <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Kim: cc List and Kathleen



I urge also adding the option of following Stockholm's lead with an emphasis on biochar. Look at the recent IBI webinar - organized by Kathleen. Former Mayor Bloomberg supplied seed funds and might want to do the same again.



Ron





On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Kim Chaffee <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> kim.chaffee2@gmail.com[biochar] < <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com> biochar@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



[Attachment(s) from Kim Chaffee included below]



All,



It sounds like NYC would be open to guidance on composting. How could we integrate biochar into this program?



Kim Chaffee

Richmond, VA USA

<mailto:Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com







If successful, it could reduce landfill use and save the city millions. There are a few obstacles to work through first, though.



<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html



Composting has such potential. It can reduce the garbage sent to landfills and save money at the same time. San Francisco claims to have reduced landfill usage by 80 percent, and Seoul, South Korea, a city of 10 million, claims that it saves $600,000 daily by charging residents and businesses fees for discarded food scraps.

But for New York City, where food scraps account for an estimated one-third of all garbage, composting is hardly making rapid or dramatic progress.

In 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio introduced the “ <https://www1.nyc.gov/site/sustainability/initiatives/zero-waste..page> Zero Waste” initiative, aiming for a 90 percent reduction in landfill use by 2030. A cornerstone of the plan was a robust compost program, where organic matter would be placed in brown bins provided by the city, picked up by the Sanitation Department, and then sold or delivered to places that turn the food into compost for gardening or convert it to energy. It is the largest compost program in the country, with brown bins for 3.5 million residents across the five boroughs, said Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.

But the program picked up only 43,000 tons of food scraps last year.

That’s about five percent of the city’s total food waste sent to landfills. For those following the Zero Waste target: We only have 85 percent more to go.

ADVERTISEMENT

The brown bin compost program, which started as a small pilot program on Staten Island in 2013, was expected to expand citywide by the end of this year. But the pickup service in some of the 24 neighborhoods where it is offered has been reduced and expansion plans have been delayed.

This leaves many New Yorkers wondering whether a composting program across the city will work. Here is an explanation of where things stand.

Go beyond the headlines.

<https://www.nytimes.com/subscription/multiproduct/lp8HYKU.html?campaignId=7FUJ9> Subscribe to The Times


How does composting save money?


The less we export to landfills, the more money we save.

The city will spend $411 million in 2019 to export about 2..5 million tons of residential, school and governmental trash to landfills located as far away as South Carolina. In 2014 the city spent $300 million. The export cost is expected to increase to $421 million by 2021.

“At this rate, we will be spending half a billion dollars,” said Antonio Reynoso, chairman of the City Council’s sanitation committee.


Is composting lucrative for the city?


Not yet. The compost program cost the city $15.7 million this year, and unlike recycling (which costs less to process than landfill waste, according to Mr. Reynoso), so far it doesn’t bring in much money. Last year, the city earned $58,000 from selling compost, according to the Sanitation Department. So there’s room for growth.


Editors’ Picks


<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122> <00xp-1968news-slide-MDOJ-promo-square640-v9.gif>


<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122> 50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204> <04BARBETTA1-square640.jpg>


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204> The Elegant Relic of Restaurant Row


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143> <00lyric-hppromo-square640-v3.jpg>


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143> The Bright Future and Grim Death of a Privileged Hollywood Daughter




ADVERTISEMENT


Who currently gets the brown bins?


Buildings with nine or fewer units in the <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/residents/current-organics-rollout> community districts where there is curbside service automatically receive brown bins, along with information on what can go in them (yes to meat and bones and coffee grounds and food-soiled paper; no to cat litter, diapers and plastic bottles). Buildings with more than nine units <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/contact/organics-collection-application> must apply for the program.


Is the compost program in jeopardy?


It’s certainly not a raging success. At this moment, the Sanitation Department is not on track to expand the program on time and has cut brown-bin pickup service from twice a week in some areas to once weekly, on recycling days. Service and pickup schedules have been experimental as the Sanitation Department tested behaviors, types of garbage trucks and routes, a Department spokeswoman said.


What was the problem with composting?


Low participation in the neighborhoods that took part in the pilot program led to inefficiencies and high costs, Ms. Garcia said. “We love composting,” said Kristin Brady, of Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, who uses the service every week. “But most of the people we know don’t compost because of cleaning the honestly somewhat gross outdoor brown bin.” A Department spokeswoman said that residents put only about 10 percent of their food scraps in the brown bins, throwing the rest in the garbage. Thus, garbage trucks with special compost compartments were running around with little to carry.


Why is participation so low?


Mr. Reynoso, who represents parts of Brooklyn, said he thinks the problem is a lack of advertising and education, and the fact that the program is voluntary. His efforts to increase the compost advertising budget have been unsuccessful, he said.

“Survey 10 people in New York City, and you would be hard-pressed to find a single person who knows how recycling works and how to make it work right, and what it means to the city financially,” Mr. Reynoso said. “In my building, we received the brown bins, and some fliers. I guarantee I’m the only person in my building who knows how to use them.”


What are the major hurdles?


“The biggest challenge is asking New Yorkers to do something different,” Ms. Garcia said. She told a story about how the department was handing out brown bins and an older man said that he didn’t want one.

“But we were handing out compost at the same time, and he definitely wanted the compost,” Ms. Garcia said. “We said, ‘We really need your banana peels in order to make this in the future.’ He took the brown bin.


Sign up for the New York Today Newsletter


Each morning, get the latest on New York businesses, arts, sports, dining, style and more.

SIGN UP

ADVERTISEMENT


Is there any good news?


New Yorkers are throwing out less trash. In 2017, the Sanitation Department collected 2.5 million tons of garbage destined for landfill, down from 2.8 million tons in 2005, even as the population grew.

While our residential recycling rate is quite low at 17 percent, New Yorkers are good recyclers of corrugated cardboard, for example (79 percent).


What about waste from businesses?


Businesses in New York City must pay to haul away their trash (an estimated 11 million tons of it every year). In 2017, large food service establishments and arenas were required to separate their food waste or face fines. In August of this year, the New York City Council <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/commercial-requirements> passed an ordinance to require large restaurants and hotels and large food manufacturers to separate out their food waste. Fines will begin in February.

Just this week, the city announced new rules that will require all private haulers picking up commercial waste to provide recycling and organics collection. Businesses will be incentivized. They will pay lower rates for food scrap and recycling pickups than they will for garbage, a spokeswoman for the Sanitation Dept. said.


Will composting come to high-rise apartment buildings?


It’s a work in progress. The Department of Sanitation says that 2,000 high rises throughout the five boroughs currently have brown bin service. An effort is underway to sign up more high rises in Manhattan and the South Bronx.

Council Member Ben Kallos represents the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The 168,000 residents in his district, the second largest in the city, mostly live in high rises. Mr. Kallos has proposed a measure that would mandate the mayor’s Zero Waste initiative to include targets and updates. The measure failed, and the effort to bring residential composting to his district has been frustrating, he said.

“We’ve worked with a number of residents and buildings to get composting,” Mr. Kallos said. “But I’ve yet to hear of any successes. I’ve never seen any brown bins in my district and I’d be surprised if there are any.”

ADVERTISEMENT

(A spokeswoman for the Department of Sanitation said that curbside service is available in all of Manhattan, including the Upper East Side, where 33 high-rise buildings have signed up for it.)


Is there a future for composting in New York City?


Experts are cautiously optimistic. Ms. Garcia said the city’s compost program is a priority, and the city remains dedicated to its Zero Waste goal. Ms. Garcia pointed out that residential compost collection is increasing. In 2017, the city collected 13,000 tons. In 2018, that amount grew to 43,000 tons (31,000 from brown bin pickups and another 12,000 from fall leaves, Greenmarket pickups and the Christmas tree recycling program).

“We’ve seen a lot of growth,” said Ms. Garcia, aided in large part by the work of nonprofits like the NYC Compost Project ( <http://nyc.gov/compostproject> nyc.gov/compostproject) and <https://www.grownyc.org/> GrowNYC, which provide food scrap drop-off sites at subway stops and at green markets.


Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [1 Attachment]

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Kathy,

This reminds me of one of the low hanging fruits of the "market pull" world.

Every village, town and city I know of has a public works department of
some sort responsible for collecting dead branches and trees. These are
normally chipped and often landfilled. According to the most recent Parks
Department data I could find, NYC, for example, landfills tons annually at
the cost of millions of dollars.

Since all of the collection costs are already incurred, this situation
offers an ideal opportunity to convert waste to biochar. The biochar can
then be used on parks and playing fields. The elimination of landfill costs
and the opportunity to cut fertilizer and watering costs should
substantially offset any production and handling costs.

Here, it seems to me, is a largely unproblematic way to incorporate biochar
in a big way and to demonstrate its virtues.

This is not a situation that requires expensive equipment and quality
control. In many places, simple TLUDs employing the homeless and unemployed
would do the job.

M

On Wed, Nov 14, 2018, 3:02 AM kdraper2@rochester.rr.com [biochar] <
biochar@yahoogroups.com wrote:


[Attachment(s) <#m_2090034984689118709_TopText> from
kdraper2@rochester.rr.com included below]

Next steps in my opinion would be to find someone that has the bandwidth,
interest and expertise to focus on this. Most likely that would be someone
that will earn some money from it either by consulting or selling product
(or technology) to them eventually. I don’t know any biochar experts in NYC
to recommend. [NYC is too far from me, the scope too big and too long-term
for me to take it on - sorry]. If someone does identify any individuals
that are interested in biochar education from NY State, I can add them to
my ever growing list of folks that I keep informed about biochar happenings
(this is only for NYS – otherwise keeping a list would overwhelm me!).



Attached is a picture of the Biomass Controls
<https://www.biomasscontrols.com/> unit at RIT which I took a few months
ago. They are doing different small scale research projects at the moment.
It’s not really public at this stage as they are still getting to know the
equipment and identifying different biomass sources to carbonize &
characterize. Dr. Tom Trabold gave a talk about some of their previous
research at the 2018 US Biochar Conference. You can find the paper on that
work here:
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864
<https://www..sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864>.
This was a joint collaboration project with RIT, Cornell & Ithaka. I assume
Tom or one of his students will be at next year’s conference and can add
more about their efforts.



Cheers

Kathleen





*[image: cid:image001.jpg@01D1A9DA.3F10B800]*

Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping,
reforestation, construction and more: https://www.biochar-journal.org/en



New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka
Journal: http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en

Biochar blogging at: http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



*From:* Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:59 PM
*To:* Draper Kathleen <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>
*Cc:* Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net>; biochar <
biochar@yahoogroups.com>
*Subject:* Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling
Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Thanks, Kathleen, Ron, Mike et al. These are all good builds on this
topic. What would be a specific action item or two for moving this forward
with the NYC folks? Also, Kathleen, do you have any information on the
Biomass Controls unit and project at RIT? Thanks again.



Kim









On Nov 13, 2018, at 12:36 PM, <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> <
kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> wrote:



Hi Kim et al –

I’m actually in discussions with some folks about piloting something like
this including biochar (of course!) in Western NY. We are in the early
planning stages but if it goes well we hope to be a demo site for others in
NYS. There are (supposedly) regulations coming down in the next few years
to restrict organics to landfill so there is a lot of attention being paid
to alternatives at the moment. The Rochester Institute of Technology is at
the forefront of educating policy makers about the benefits of
thermochemical conversion. They will be hosting a seminar in March on food
waste alternatives and will be showing off their Biomass Controls unit
which they are currently using to carbonize different types of food waste.



Cheers

Kathleen





*<image001.jpg>*

Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping,
reforestation, construction and more: https://www.biochar-journal.org/en



New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka
Journal: http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en

Biochar blogging at: http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



*From:* Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net>
*Sent:* Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:10 PM
*To:* biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com>; Kim Chaffee <
kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>; Kathleen Draper <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>
*Subject:* Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling
Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Kim: cc List and Kathleen



I urge also adding the option of following Stockholm's
lead with an emphasis on biochar. Look at the recent IBI webinar -
organized by Kathleen. Former Mayor Bloomberg supplied seed funds and
might want to do the same again.



Ron





On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@gmail.com[biochar] <
biochar@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



*[Attachment(s) from Kim Chaffee included below]*



All,



It sounds like NYC would be open to guidance on composting. How could we
integrate biochar into this program?



Kim Chaffee

Richmond, VA USA

Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com







If successful, it could reduce landfill use and save the city millions.
There are a few obstacles to work through first, though.




https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html




Composting has such potential. It can reduce the garbage sent to landfills
and save money at the same time. San Francisco claims to have reduced
landfill usage by 80 percent, and Seoul, South Korea, a city of 10 million,
claims that it saves $600,000 daily by charging residents and businesses
fees for discarded food scraps.

But for New York City, where food scraps account for an estimated
one-third of all garbage, composting is hardly making rapid or dramatic
progress.

In 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio introduced the “Zero Waste
<https://www1.nyc.gov/site/sustainability/initiatives/zero-waste..page>”
initiative, aiming for a 90 percent reduction in landfill use by 2030. A
cornerstone of the plan was a robust compost program, where organic matter
would be placed in brown bins provided by the city, picked up by the
Sanitation Department, and then sold or delivered to places that turn the
food into compost for gardening or convert it to energy. It is the largest
compost program in the country, with brown bins for 3.5 million residents
across the five boroughs, said Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.

But the program picked up only 43,000 tons of food scraps last year.

That’s about five percent of the city’s total food waste sent to
landfills. For those following the Zero Waste target: We only have 85
percent more to go.

ADVERTISEMENT

The brown bin compost program, which started as a small pilot program on
Staten Island in 2013, was expected to expand citywide by the end of this
year. But the pickup service in some of the 24 neighborhoods where it is
offered has been reduced and expansion plans have been delayed.

This leaves many New Yorkers wondering whether a composting program across
the city will work. Here is an explanation of where things stand.

*Go beyond the headlines.*

*Subscribe to The Times
<https://www.nytimes.com/subscription/multiproduct/lp8HYKU.html?campaignId=7FUJ9>*
How does composting save money?

The less we export to landfills, the more money we save.

The city will spend $411 million in 2019 to export about 2.5 million tons
of residential, school and governmental trash to landfills located as far
away as South Carolina. In 2014 the city spent $300 million. The export
cost is expected to increase to $421 million by 2021.

“At this rate, we will be spending half a billion dollars,” said Antonio
Reynoso, chairman of the City Council’s sanitation committee.
Is composting lucrative for the city?

Not yet. The compost program cost the city $15.7 million this year, and
unlike recycling (which costs less to process than landfill waste,
according to Mr. Reynoso), so far it doesn’t bring in much money. Last
year, the city earned $58,000 from selling compost, according to the
Sanitation Department. So there’s room for growth.
Editors’ Picks

<00xp-1968news-slide-MDOJ-promo-square640-v9.gif>
<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>
50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968
<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>

<04BARBETTA1-square640.jpg>
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>
The Elegant Relic of Restaurant Row
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>

<00lyric-hppromo-square640-v3.jpg>
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>
The Bright Future and Grim Death of a Privileged Hollywood Daughter
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>



ADVERTISEMENT
Who currently gets the brown bins?

Buildings with nine or fewer units in the community districts where there
is curbside service
<https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/residents/current-organics-rollout> automatically
receive brown bins, along with information on what can go in them (yes to
meat and bones and coffee grounds and food-soiled paper; no to cat litter,
diapers and plastic bottles). Buildings with more than nine units must
apply
<https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/contact/organics-collection-application> for
the program.
Is the compost program in jeopardy?

It’s certainly not a raging success. At this moment, the Sanitation
Department is not on track to expand the program on time and has cut
brown-bin pickup service from twice a week in some areas to once weekly, on
recycling days. Service and pickup schedules have been experimental as the
Sanitation Department tested behaviors, types of garbage trucks and routes,
a Department spokeswoman said.
What was the problem with composting?

Low participation in the neighborhoods that took part in the pilot program
led to inefficiencies and high costs, Ms. Garcia said. “We love
composting,” said Kristin Brady, of Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, who uses the
service every week. “But most of the people we know don’t compost because
of cleaning the honestly somewhat gross outdoor brown bin.” A Department
spokeswoman said that residents put only about 10 percent of their food
scraps in the brown bins, throwing the rest in the garbage. Thus, garbage
trucks with special compost compartments were running around with little to
carry.
Why is participation so low?

Mr. Reynoso, who represents parts of Brooklyn, said he thinks the problem
is a lack of advertising and education, and the fact that the program is
voluntary. His efforts to increase the compost advertising budget have been
unsuccessful, he said.

“Survey 10 people in New York City, and you would be hard-pressed to find
a single person who knows how recycling works and how to make it work
right, and what it means to the city financially,” Mr. Reynoso said. “In my
building, we received the brown bins, and some fliers. I guarantee I’m the
only person in my building who knows how to use them.”
What are the major hurdles?

“The biggest challenge is asking New Yorkers to do something different,”
Ms. Garcia said. She told a story about how the department was handing out
brown bins and an older man said that he didn’t want one.

“But we were handing out compost at the same time, and he definitely
wanted the compost,” Ms. Garcia said. “We said, ‘We really need your banana
peels in order to make this in the future.’ He took the brown bin.
Sign up for the New York Today Newsletter

Each morning, get the latest on New York businesses, arts, sports, dining,
style and more.

SIGN UP

ADVERTISEMENT
Is there any good news?

New Yorkers are throwing out less trash. In 2017, the Sanitation
Department collected 2.5 million tons of garbage destined for landfill,
down from 2.8 million tons in 2005, even as the population grew.

While our residential recycling rate is quite low at 17 percent, New
Yorkers are good recyclers of corrugated cardboard, for example (79
percent).
What about waste from businesses?

Businesses in New York City must pay to haul away their trash (an
estimated 11 million tons of it every year). In 2017, large food service
establishments and arenas were required to separate their food waste or
face fines. In August of this year, the New York City Council passed an
ordinance
<https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/commercial-requirements> to
require large restaurants and hotels and large food manufacturers to
separate out their food waste. Fines will begin in February.

Just this week, the city announced new rules that will require all private
haulers picking up commercial waste to provide recycling and organics
collection. Businesses will be incentivized. They will pay lower rates for
food scrap and recycling pickups than they will for garbage, a spokeswoman
for the Sanitation Dept. said.
Will composting come to high-rise apartment buildings?

It’s a work in progress. The Department of Sanitation says that 2,000 high
rises throughout the five boroughs currently have brown bin service. An
effort is underway to sign up more high rises in Manhattan and the South
Bronx.

Council Member Ben Kallos represents the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The
168,000 residents in his district, the second largest in the city, mostly
live in high rises. Mr. Kallos has proposed a measure that would mandate
the mayor’s Zero Waste initiative to include targets and updates. The
measure failed, and the effort to bring residential composting to his
district has been frustrating, he said.

“We’ve worked with a number of residents and buildings to get composting,”
Mr. Kallos said. “But I’ve yet to hear of any successes. I’ve never seen
any brown bins in my district and I’d be surprised if there are any.”

ADVERTISEMENT

(A spokeswoman for the Department of Sanitation said that curbside service
is available in all of Manhattan, including the Upper East Side, where 33
high-rise buildings have signed up for it.)
Is there a future for composting in New York City?

Experts are cautiously optimistic. Ms. Garcia said the city’s compost
program is a priority, and the city remains dedicated to its Zero Waste
goal. Ms. Garcia pointed out that residential compost collection is
increasing. In 2017, the city collected 13,000 tons. In 2018, that amount
grew to 43,000 tons (31,000 from brown bin pickups and another 12,000 from
fall leaves, Greenmarket pickups and the Christmas tree recycling program).

“We’ve seen a lot of growth,” said Ms. Garcia, aided in large part by the
work of nonprofits like the NYC Compost Project (nyc.gov/compostproject)
and GrowNYC <https://www.grownyc.org/>, which provide food scrap drop-off
sites at subway stops and at green markets.










Re: Food waste compost vs. hog feeding

Dick Gallien
 

What does your community do with it's food and wood waste--do you know?  When I opened The Winona Farm compost site in 1990, because Winona's site was such a scam,  a young woman showed up and suggested that I could use a sign.  She was the County Environmental person, who spent $430 for a sign.  A year later, realizing the political breeze had changed, I asked if the County could pay the $42 for a sign to hang below the initial sign stating, "Open every day, from dawn until dark", which it has been since, but she said the County didn't have the money and has never spent a dime on County composting since.  In 2016 I wrote a letter to the ed., describing this unusual 175 acres, at the junction of a mile of 2 trout streams, 3 mi. from the center of Winona, (27K) yet protected by 500' hills, a natural burial site and a Conservation Easement with the Mn. Land Trust, which protects it from development and which we wanted to donate to a worthy environmental group..  Though between my wife and I we have 16 children,  even if one was interested, eventually they'd tire of trying to scrape out a living when some wealthy person would pay a couple million for this farm and this would become their locked gate show off estate, which is the last thing I want it to be used for.  There were no serious inquiries until lets call the County woman (X) showed up. During the 20 years, when the largest supermarket filled 12+ barrels, every day except Xmas for 3 yrs., while other super markets and schools sent their food waste 75 mi. to a Wi. land fill, X "talked about" residential food waste.  Starting in SF and NYC, residential food waste funding has arrived in Southern Mn. and X had a plan.  She had hired Max as a County Consultant.  X said that Max had a lot of experience, which I listed in a letter to the editor.  Max's Full Circle Organics 1st strike was Farley, Iowa, which closed after what neighbors claimed was 4 yrs. of unabated stench.  Strike 2 was Max's home town of Good Thunder, Mn. (pop 600) 12 mi. South of Mankato, where Max convinced the Fitzimmon farm family that it was a good business venture, so they donated $1 million toward the $1.7 million to pour a 10 acre 6" asphalt pad on rich corn ground.  Dead after less than 2 yrs..  Strike 3 Becker, Mn. 20 mi. SE of St. Cloud, Mn.. Max. Inc. leased land from an operating land fill for a 6 acre asphalt pad.  After less than 2 yrs. they had screened so much trash out of what people toss into their residential food waste, that MPCA wouldn't allow them to bury or burn on site and obviously the land fill he leased the land from wouldn't take it for no charge, so one might expect 3 strikes would do it----except X needed a consultant and she had started a non profit, Sustain Winona, so if we would donate this farm to Sustain Winona, Max could be given a 4th strike, with County money.  When we pulled out of Max's 4th strike X confused the County Board when she asked for a $93K feasibility study to put it in the old land fill/Stone Pt. Park, overlooking this farm.  Where it should be is near booming Rochester, Mn., which not only has the volume of food waste but the market for compost.  Unlike bulky compost, a big market for plastics was China.  SF evidently has orchards and hi dollar crops nearby, where NYC has little such crop land nearby, in comparison.  And how does your community handle wood waste.  Seriously, I hope there are some creative uses being made of these "natural resources", which I would like to hear about.  
Dick Gallien 
22501 East Burns Valley Road
Winona  MN  55987
dickgallien@...  [507]454-3126
www.thefarm.winona-mn.us

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures, questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education, while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose of their confinement, it is too late.


On Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 10:36 AM Dick Gallien <dickgallien@...> wrote:
Between NYC and Shakytown, all communities produce organic wastes which most try to sweep under the rug, by burning, burying or flushing.  The ideal in life is to find some worthwhile endeavor, that gives one such INNER SATISFACTION, that they would do it for no pay, which has been my hang up, involving the organic wastes from Winona, Mn. pop. 27K..,starting in 1958, by feeding food waste from WSTC to hogs, while attending on the G.I. Bill. Returned to this farm in 1970, put a 2K ga. tank on a 10 T farm wagon and hauled over 500 loads of lilquid treated sewage, that the City had been running on to a 3' high sand bar adjoining the Ms. River through a 4" fire hose, out the back door of their NEW sewage plant, until MPCA warned us that the sewage had a high PCB rate, in that my wife was p.g..  Had her milk tested by WARF Inst. (founder of WARFARin rat poison) at Madison, which contained 3.2 ppm of PCB's and the amount of 6 other toxins, including DDT, but she grew up in Cliffside Pk., N.J. overlooking Manhattan. Our pediatrician suggested she not breast feed, but she did and our 42 yr. old dd is all health, so far.  

In 20 yrs. we've fed an estimated 16,000 tons of food waste to hogs with zero outside help.  Feeding hogs rates above composting food waste in the EPA's inverted triangle of best uses.  Hogs eat ALL food waste, except the occasional fork or spoon.  A Fed. law requires that all food waste be cooked (boiled for 30 min.).  It is up to each state as to whether they allow it and if they do, they must administer it.  Mn. has allowed it, while Wi. and Iowa don't.  Vt. doesn't allow feeding hogs food waste, but Karl Hammer of Vt. Composting is allowed to raise 650 laying hens 100% on raw food waste 2 mi. from the State Capitol in Montpelier--Mn. doesn't.  Ten yrs.ago our state inspector told of being at a conference of state inspectors, where a Tx. inspector told him he estimated 6K+ feed food waste in Tx..  On his next visit we told our inspector that only 2,000 were registered to feed in Tx..  He just laughed and added that food waste feeding has always been big in the South Eastern states and the Mob controls it in N.J..  

Because of the outbreak of African Swine Flu in China, I just noticed that Tx. has ended food waste feeding, as has our inspector, though we are only 1 of 8 licensed in Mn...  As with abortion, drugs, etc., it is enough to make sinners out of angels, but the bureaucrats rears will be covered, incase of a hog disease outbreak in this country.

There is a huge difference between the "pure food waste" we feed/fed, which has zero trash and is regulated by the MDA Animal Health, which doesn't require hog feeding on impervious pads and encourages farm animal composting vs. "residential food waste", under MPCA which includes an endless list of compostibles, which must be composted on an impervious pad equaling millions before starting, plus a market for the compost.
The MDNR Forestery Dept. regulates tree waste and has zero interest in biochar.  They charge $5 a yr. for a burn permit, which asks that the pile be lit on top and not to irritate neighbors, except Winona burned 1K ash trees last year, with anther 1K to take down and burn.  At $250 a ft. I'm applying for a Sustainable Ag. Demonstration Grant for railroad tank car rims, 10' dia.X 8'.  I'm not sure if the DOT 111's at only 7/16" will hold up.  The fuel tank ends at only 1/4" X 10' dia X 7.5' can't take the beating.  If I cut out the one end, they'll flop.  
For the 19th yr., Winona is bringing an average 400 truck loads of City street leaves to this farm, obviously concluding $10 a load is the cheapest way to get rid of them. This City now has a full time Environmental Coordinator, as does WSU and Winona County.  I have no idea how they pass their time and never see them, but if I had those tank rims and an Orbit Screener I'd be happily driving into the sunset spreading manurized compost plus biochar on these fields.  At 87, I'd better hurry.  Dick, at The Winona Farm 507 312 0194
 


Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compo

Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

In my opinion burning food waste from a urban environment is very difficult (the material is very humid)

 

On the contrary composting could be a better approach (Su-Johnson static reactor or tumblers ) or some suggest small biodigesters

 

Carbonizing should instead be used for any woody biomass produced in the neighborhood

 

The biochar from the woody biomass should be used in the composting or digesting of food waste to obtain a better output for the urban trees, orchards, gardens …

 

Da: biochar@...
Inviato: mercoledì 14 novembre 2018 15:55
A: biochar@...
Oggetto: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compo

 

 

Kim,

 

What are the decentralized neighborhood based environmental management collective impact options available in regard to carbonizing food residues ?  What form should this project take in order to produce the widest function.....?

 

In other words, can the NYC food residue diversion/composting project be turned into an indoor/outdoor local food production project at the local level in a field-to-field approach.  For example, can the food residue carbonizing efforts be used, on a decentralized appropriate scale, to produce heat and power to grow vegetables in greenhouses year=round.  In this example, the harvest from the greenhouse in sold in the immediate area.

 

Can the NYC food residue/composting project be morphed into a Decentralized Urban Ag project, which needs heat, powder, nutrients and the shadow of the growers to thrive.......?

 

my 2 cents

 

Mike

 

 

 

 

 


Food waste compost vs. hog feeding

Dick Gallien
 

Between NYC and Shakytown, all communities produce organic wastes which most try to sweep under the rug, by burning, burying or flushing.  The ideal in life is to find some worthwhile endeavor, that gives one such INNER SATISFACTION, that they would do it for no pay, which has been my hang up, involving the organic wastes from Winona, Mn. pop. 27K..,starting in 1958, by feeding food waste from WSTC to hogs, while attending on the G.I. Bill. Returned to this farm in 1970, put a 2K ga. tank on a 10 T farm wagon and hauled over 500 loads of lilquid treated sewage, that the City had been running on to a 3' high sand bar adjoining the Ms. River through a 4" fire hose, out the back door of their NEW sewage plant, until MPCA warned us that the sewage had a high PCB rate, in that my wife was p.g..  Had her milk tested by WARF Inst. (founder of WARFARin rat poison) at Madison, which contained 3.2 ppm of PCB's and the amount of 6 other toxins, including DDT, but she grew up in Cliffside Pk., N.J. overlooking Manhattan. Our pediatrician suggested she not breast feed, but she did and our 42 yr. old dd is all health, so far.  

In 20 yrs. we've fed an estimated 16,000 tons of food waste to hogs with zero outside help.  Feeding hogs rates above composting food waste in the EPA's inverted triangle of best uses.  Hogs eat ALL food waste, except the occasional fork or spoon.  A Fed. law requires that all food waste be cooked (boiled for 30 min.).  It is up to each state as to whether they allow it and if they do, they must administer it.  Mn. has allowed it, while Wi. and Iowa don't.  Vt. doesn't allow feeding hogs food waste, but Karl Hammer of Vt. Composting is allowed to raise 650 laying hens 100% on raw food waste 2 mi. from the State Capitol in Montpelier--Mn. doesn't.  Ten yrs.ago our state inspector told of being at a conference of state inspectors, where a Tx. inspector told him he estimated 6K+ feed food waste in Tx..  On his next visit we told our inspector that only 2,000 were registered to feed in Tx..  He just laughed and added that food waste feeding has always been big in the South Eastern states and the Mob controls it in N.J..  

Because of the outbreak of African Swine Flu in China, I just noticed that Tx. has ended food waste feeding, as has our inspector, though we are only 1 of 8 licensed in Mn...  As with abortion, drugs, etc., it is enough to make sinners out of angels, but the bureaucrats rears will be covered, incase of a hog disease outbreak in this country.

There is a huge difference between the "pure food waste" we feed/fed, which has zero trash and is regulated by the MDA Animal Health, which doesn't require hog feeding on impervious pads and encourages farm animal composting vs. "residential food waste", under MPCA which includes an endless list of compostibles, which must be composted on an impervious pad equaling millions before starting, plus a market for the compost.
The MDNR Forestery Dept. regulates tree waste and has zero interest in biochar.  They charge $5 a yr. for a burn permit, which asks that the pile be lit on top and not to irritate neighbors, except Winona burned 1K ash trees last year, with anther 1K to take down and burn.  At $250 a ft. I'm applying for a Sustainable Ag. Demonstration Grant for railroad tank car rims, 10' dia.X 8'.  I'm not sure if the DOT 111's at only 7/16" will hold up.  The fuel tank ends at only 1/4" X 10' dia X 7.5' can't take the beating.  If I cut out the one end, they'll flop.  
For the 19th yr., Winona is bringing an average 400 truck loads of City street leaves to this farm, obviously concluding $10 a load is the cheapest way to get rid of them. This City now has a full time Environmental Coordinator, as does WSU and Winona County.  I have no idea how they pass their time and never see them, but if I had those tank rims and an Orbit Screener I'd be happily driving into the sunset spreading manurized compost plus biochar on these fields.  At 87, I'd better hurry.  Dick, at The Winona Farm 507 312 0194
 


Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compo

mikethewormguy
 

Kim,

What are the decentralized neighborhood based environmental management collective impact options available in regard to carbonizing food residues ?  What form should this project take in order to produce the widest function.....?

In other words, can the NYC food residue diversion/composting project be turned into an indoor/outdoor local food production project at the local level in a field-to-field approach.  For example, can the food residue carbonizing efforts be used, on a decentralized appropriate scale, to produce heat and power to grow vegetables in greenhouses year=round.  In this example, the harvest from the greenhouse in sold in the immediate area.

Can the NYC food residue/composting project be morphed into a Decentralized Urban Ag project, which needs heat, powder, nutrients and the shadow of the growers to thrive.......?

my 2 cents

Mike






Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [1 Attachment]

Kim Chaffee
 

Thanks, Kathleen. Actually, I met a young woman at the SHI conference last month. Sara Perl Egendorf is a Ph.D student at CUNY in Earth & Environmental Science. She is also an Adjunct Lecturer at Brooklyn College’s NYC Urban Soils Institute. She’s investigated legacy lead in urban soils is interested in biochar. We discussed NYC’s repurposing soil that has been removed during construction for use in urban gardens. She did a poster (not sure of the conference) on the bioavailability of metals in soil.

Any suggestions about what to include in my email to her? Thanks.

Kim

On Nov 13, 2018, at 1:43 PM, kdraper2@rochester.rr.com [biochar] <biochar@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

[Attachment(s) <x-msg://6/#TopText> from kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> included below]

Next steps in my opinion would be to find someone that has the bandwidth, interest and expertise to focus on this. Most likely that would be someone that will earn some money from it either by consulting or selling product (or technology) to them eventually. I don’t know any biochar experts in NYC to recommend. [NYC is too far from me, the scope too big and too long-term for me to take it on - sorry]. If someone does identify any individuals that are interested in biochar education from NY State, I can add them to my ever growing list of folks that I keep informed about biochar happenings (this is only for NYS – otherwise keeping a list would overwhelm me!).


Attached is a picture of the Biomass Controls <https://www.biomasscontrols.com/> unit at RIT which I took a few months ago. They are doing different small scale research projects at the moment. It’s not really public at this stage as they are still getting to know the equipment and identifying different biomass sources to carbonize & characterize. Dr. Tom Trabold gave a talk about some of their previous research at the 2018 US Biochar Conference. You can find the paper on that work here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864 <https://www..sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864>. This was a joint collaboration project with RIT, Cornell & Ithaka. I assume Tom or one of his students will be at next year’s conference and can add more about their efforts.


Cheers

Kathleen



<image001.jpg>

Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: https://www.biochar-journal.org/en

New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en
Biochar blogging at: http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/


From: Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:59 PM
To: Draper Kathleen <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>>
Cc: Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net <mailto:rongretlarson@comcast.net>>; biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]


Thanks, Kathleen, Ron, Mike et al. These are all good builds on this topic. What would be a specific action item or two for moving this forward with the NYC folks? Also, Kathleen, do you have any information on the Biomass Controls unit and project at RIT? Thanks again.


Kim








On Nov 13, 2018, at 12:36 PM, <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>> <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>> wrote:


Hi Kim et al –

I’m actually in discussions with some folks about piloting something like this including biochar (of course!) in Western NY. We are in the early planning stages but if it goes well we hope to be a demo site for others in NYS. There are (supposedly) regulations coming down in the next few years to restrict organics to landfill so there is a lot of attention being paid to alternatives at the moment. The Rochester Institute of Technology is at the forefront of educating policy makers about the benefits of thermochemical conversion. They will be hosting a seminar in March on food waste alternatives and will be showing off their Biomass Controls unit which they are currently using to carbonize different types of food waste.



Cheers

Kathleen





<image001.jpg>

Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: https://www.biochar-journal.org/en


New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en
Biochar blogging at: http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



From: Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net <mailto:rongretlarson@comcast.net>>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:10 PM
To: biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com>>; Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>>; Kathleen Draper <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>>
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Kim: cc List and Kathleen



I urge also adding the option of following Stockholm's lead with an emphasis on biochar. Look at the recent IBI webinar - organized by Kathleen. Former Mayor Bloomberg supplied seed funds and might want to do the same again.



Ron





On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>[biochar] <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:



[Attachment(s) <x-msg://79/#TopText> from Kim Chaffee included below]



All,



It sounds like NYC would be open to guidance on composting. How could we integrate biochar into this program?



Kim Chaffee

Richmond, VA USA

Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>






If successful, it could reduce landfill use and save the city millions. There are a few obstacles to work through first, though.



https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html



Composting has such potential. It can reduce the garbage sent to landfills and save money at the same time. San Francisco claims to have reduced landfill usage by 80 percent, and Seoul, South Korea, a city of 10 million, claims that it saves $600,000 daily by charging residents and businesses fees for discarded food scraps.

But for New York City, where food scraps account for an estimated one-third of all garbage, composting is hardly making rapid or dramatic progress.

In 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio introduced the “Zero Waste <https://www1.nyc.gov/site/sustainability/initiatives/zero-waste..page>” initiative, aiming for a 90 percent reduction in landfill use by 2030. A cornerstone of the plan was a robust compost program, where organic matter would be placed in brown bins provided by the city, picked up by the Sanitation Department, and then sold or delivered to places that turn the food into compost for gardening or convert it to energy. It is the largest compost program in the country, with brown bins for 3.5 million residents across the five boroughs, said Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.

But the program picked up only 43,000 tons of food scraps last year.

That’s about five percent of the city’s total food waste sent to landfills. For those following the Zero Waste target: We only have 85 percent more to go.

ADVERTISEMENT

The brown bin compost program, which started as a small pilot program on Staten Island in 2013, was expected to expand citywide by the end of this year. But the pickup service in some of the 24 neighborhoods where it is offered has been reduced and expansion plans have been delayed.

This leaves many New Yorkers wondering whether a composting program across the city will work. Here is an explanation of where things stand.

Go beyond the headlines.

Subscribe to The Times <https://www.nytimes.com/subscription/multiproduct/lp8HYKU.html?campaignId=7FUJ9>
How does composting save money?

The less we export to landfills, the more money we save.

The city will spend $411 million in 2019 to export about 2.5 million tons of residential, school and governmental trash to landfills located as far away as South Carolina. In 2014 the city spent $300 million. The export cost is expected to increase to $421 million by 2021.

“At this rate, we will be spending half a billion dollars,” said Antonio Reynoso, chairman of the City Council’s sanitation committee.

Is composting lucrative for the city?

Not yet. The compost program cost the city $15.7 million this year, and unlike recycling (which costs less to process than landfill waste, according to Mr. Reynoso), so far it doesn’t bring in much money. Last year, the city earned $58,000 from selling compost, according to the Sanitation Department. So there’s room for growth.

Editors’ Picks

<00xp-1968news-slide-MDOJ-promo-square640-v9.gif> <https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>
50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968 <https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>
<04BARBETTA1-square640.jpg> <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>
The Elegant Relic of Restaurant Row <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>
<00lyric-hppromo-square640-v3.jpg> <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>
The Bright Future and Grim Death of a Privileged Hollywood Daughter  <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>


ADVERTISEMENT

Who currently gets the brown bins?

Buildings with nine or fewer units in the community districts where there is curbside service <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/residents/current-organics-rollout> automatically receive brown bins, along with information on what can go in them (yes to meat and bones and coffee grounds and food-soiled paper; no to cat litter, diapers and plastic bottles). Buildings with more than nine units must apply <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/contact/organics-collection-application> for the program.

Is the compost program in jeopardy?

It’s certainly not a raging success. At this moment, the Sanitation Department is not on track to expand the program on time and has cut brown-bin pickup service from twice a week in some areas to once weekly, on recycling days. Service and pickup schedules have been experimental as the Sanitation Department tested behaviors, types of garbage trucks and routes, a Department spokeswoman said.

What was the problem with composting?

Low participation in the neighborhoods that took part in the pilot program led to inefficiencies and high costs, Ms. Garcia said. “We love composting,” said Kristin Brady, of Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, who uses the service every week. “But most of the people we know don’t compost because of cleaning the honestly somewhat gross outdoor brown bin.” A Department spokeswoman said that residents put only about 10 percent of their food scraps in the brown bins, throwing the rest in the garbage. Thus, garbage trucks with special compost compartments were running around with little to carry.

Why is participation so low?

Mr. Reynoso, who represents parts of Brooklyn, said he thinks the problem is a lack of advertising and education, and the fact that the program is voluntary. His efforts to increase the compost advertising budget have been unsuccessful, he said.

“Survey 10 people in New York City, and you would be hard-pressed to find a single person who knows how recycling works and how to make it work right, and what it means to the city financially,” Mr. Reynoso said. “In my building, we received the brown bins, and some fliers. I guarantee I’m the only person in my building who knows how to use them.”

What are the major hurdles?

“The biggest challenge is asking New Yorkers to do something different,” Ms. Garcia said. She told a story about how the department was handing out brown bins and an older man said that he didn’t want one.

“But we were handing out compost at the same time, and he definitely wanted the compost,” Ms. Garcia said. “We said, ‘We really need your banana peels in order to make this in the future.’ He took the brown bin.

Sign up for the New York Today Newsletter
Each morning, get the latest on New York businesses, arts, sports, dining, style and more.

SIGN UP

ADVERTISEMENT

Is there any good news?

New Yorkers are throwing out less trash. In 2017, the Sanitation Department collected 2.5 million tons of garbage destined for landfill, down from 2.8 million tons in 2005, even as the population grew.

While our residential recycling rate is quite low at 17 percent, New Yorkers are good recyclers of corrugated cardboard, for example (79 percent).

What about waste from businesses?

Businesses in New York City must pay to haul away their trash (an estimated 11 million tons of it every year). In 2017, large food service establishments and arenas were required to separate their food waste or face fines. In August of this year, the New York City Council passed an ordinance <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/commercial-requirements> to require large restaurants and hotels and large food manufacturers to separate out their food waste. Fines will begin in February.

Just this week, the city announced new rules that will require all private haulers picking up commercial waste to provide recycling and organics collection. Businesses will be incentivized. They will pay lower rates for food scrap and recycling pickups than they will for garbage, a spokeswoman for the Sanitation Dept. said.

Will composting come to high-rise apartment buildings?

It’s a work in progress. The Department of Sanitation says that 2,000 high rises throughout the five boroughs currently have brown bin service. An effort is underway to sign up more high rises in Manhattan and the South Bronx.

Council Member Ben Kallos represents the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The 168,000 residents in his district, the second largest in the city, mostly live in high rises. Mr. Kallos has proposed a measure that would mandate the mayor’s Zero Waste initiative to include targets and updates. The measure failed, and the effort to bring residential composting to his district has been frustrating, he said.

“We’ve worked with a number of residents and buildings to get composting,” Mr. Kallos said. “But I’ve yet to hear of any successes. I’ve never seen any brown bins in my district and I’d be surprised if there are any.”

ADVERTISEMENT

(A spokeswoman for the Department of Sanitation said that curbside service is available in all of Manhattan, including the Upper East Side, where 33 high-rise buildings have signed up for it.)

Is there a future for composting in New York City?

Experts are cautiously optimistic. Ms. Garcia said the city’s compost program is a priority, and the city remains dedicated to its Zero Waste goal. Ms. Garcia pointed out that residential compost collection is increasing. In 2017, the city collected 13,000 tons. In 2018, that amount grew to 43,000 tons (31,000 from brown bin pickups and another 12,000 from fall leaves, Greenmarket pickups and the Christmas tree recycling program).

“We’ve seen a lot of growth,” said Ms. Garcia, aided in large part by the work of nonprofits like the NYC Compost Project (nyc.gov/compostproject <http://nyc.gov/compostproject>) and GrowNYC <https://www.grownyc.org/>, which provide food scrap drop-off sites at subway stops and at green markets.







Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]

Kathleen Draper
 

Next steps in my opinion would be to find someone that has the bandwidth, interest and expertise to focus on this. Most likely that would be someone that will earn some money from it either by consulting or selling product (or technology) to them eventually. I don’t know any biochar experts in NYC to recommend. [NYC is too far from me, the scope too big and too long-term for me to take it on - sorry]. If someone does identify any individuals that are interested in biochar education from NY State, I can add them to my ever growing list of folks that I keep informed about biochar happenings (this is only for NYS – otherwise keeping a list would overwhelm me!).



Attached is a picture of the Biomass Controls <https://www.biomasscontrols.com/> unit at RIT which I took a few months ago. They are doing different small scale research projects at the moment. It’s not really public at this stage as they are still getting to know the equipment and identifying different biomass sources to carbonize & characterize. Dr. Tom Trabold gave a talk about some of their previous research at the 2018 US Biochar Conference. You can find the paper on that work here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959652618317864. This was a joint collaboration project with RIT, Cornell & Ithaka. I assume Tom or one of his students will be at next year’s conference and can add more about their efforts.



Cheers

Kathleen







Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: <https://www.biochar-journal.org/en> https://www.biochar-journal.org/en



New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: <http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en> http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en

Biochar blogging at: <http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/> http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



From: Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:59 PM
To: Draper Kathleen <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>
Cc: Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net>; biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Thanks, Kathleen, Ron, Mike et al. These are all good builds on this topic. What would be a specific action item or two for moving this forward with the NYC folks? Also, Kathleen, do you have any information on the Biomass Controls unit and project at RIT? Thanks again.



Kim











On Nov 13, 2018, at 12:36 PM, <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> > <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> > wrote:



Hi Kim et al –

I’m actually in discussions with some folks about piloting something like this including biochar (of course!) in Western NY. We are in the early planning stages but if it goes well we hope to be a demo site for others in NYS. There are (supposedly) regulations coming down in the next few years to restrict organics to landfill so there is a lot of attention being paid to alternatives at the moment. The Rochester Institute of Technology is at the forefront of educating policy makers about the benefits of thermochemical conversion. They will be hosting a seminar in March on food waste alternatives and will be showing off their Biomass Controls unit which they are currently using to carbonize different types of food waste.



Cheers

Kathleen





<image001.jpg>

Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: <https://www.biochar-journal.org/en> https://www.biochar-journal.org/en



New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: <http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en> http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en

Biochar blogging at: <http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/> http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/



From: Ronal W. Larson < <mailto:rongretlarson@comcast.net> rongretlarson@comcast.net>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:10 PM
To: biochar < <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com> biochar@yahoogroups.com>; Kim Chaffee < <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>; Kathleen Draper < <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]



Kim: cc List and Kathleen



I urge also adding the option of following Stockholm's lead with an emphasis on biochar. Look at the recent IBI webinar - organized by Kathleen. Former Mayor Bloomberg supplied seed funds and might want to do the same again.



Ron





On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Kim Chaffee <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> kim.chaffee2@gmail.com[biochar] < <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com> biochar@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



[ <x-msg://79/#TopText> Attachment(s) from Kim Chaffee included below]



All,



It sounds like NYC would be open to guidance on composting. How could we integrate biochar into this program?



Kim Chaffee

Richmond, VA USA

<mailto:Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com> Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com







If successful, it could reduce landfill use and save the city millions. There are a few obstacles to work through first, though.



<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html



Composting has such potential. It can reduce the garbage sent to landfills and save money at the same time. San Francisco claims to have reduced landfill usage by 80 percent, and Seoul, South Korea, a city of 10 million, claims that it saves $600,000 daily by charging residents and businesses fees for discarded food scraps.

But for New York City, where food scraps account for an estimated one-third of all garbage, composting is hardly making rapid or dramatic progress.

In 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio introduced the “ <https://www1.nyc.gov/site/sustainability/initiatives/zero-waste..page> Zero Waste” initiative, aiming for a 90 percent reduction in landfill use by 2030. A cornerstone of the plan was a robust compost program, where organic matter would be placed in brown bins provided by the city, picked up by the Sanitation Department, and then sold or delivered to places that turn the food into compost for gardening or convert it to energy. It is the largest compost program in the country, with brown bins for 3.5 million residents across the five boroughs, said Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.

But the program picked up only 43,000 tons of food scraps last year.

That’s about five percent of the city’s total food waste sent to landfills. For those following the Zero Waste target: We only have 85 percent more to go.

ADVERTISEMENT

The brown bin compost program, which started as a small pilot program on Staten Island in 2013, was expected to expand citywide by the end of this year. But the pickup service in some of the 24 neighborhoods where it is offered has been reduced and expansion plans have been delayed.

This leaves many New Yorkers wondering whether a composting program across the city will work. Here is an explanation of where things stand.

Go beyond the headlines.

<https://www.nytimes.com/subscription/multiproduct/lp8HYKU.html?campaignId=7FUJ9> Subscribe to The Times


How does composting save money?


The less we export to landfills, the more money we save.

The city will spend $411 million in 2019 to export about 2.5 million tons of residential, school and governmental trash to landfills located as far away as South Carolina. In 2014 the city spent $300 million. The export cost is expected to increase to $421 million by 2021.

“At this rate, we will be spending half a billion dollars,” said Antonio Reynoso, chairman of the City Council’s sanitation committee.


Is composting lucrative for the city?


Not yet. The compost program cost the city $15.7 million this year, and unlike recycling (which costs less to process than landfill waste, according to Mr. Reynoso), so far it doesn’t bring in much money. Last year, the city earned $58,000 from selling compost, according to the Sanitation Department. So there’s room for growth.


Editors’ Picks


<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122> <00xp-1968news-slide-MDOJ-promo-square640-v9.gif>


<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122> 50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204> <04BARBETTA1-square640.jpg>


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204> The Elegant Relic of Restaurant Row


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143> <00lyric-hppromo-square640-v3.jpg>


<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143> The Bright Future and Grim Death of a Privileged Hollywood Daughter




ADVERTISEMENT


Who currently gets the brown bins?


Buildings with nine or fewer units in the <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/residents/current-organics-rollout> community districts where there is curbside service automatically receive brown bins, along with information on what can go in them (yes to meat and bones and coffee grounds and food-soiled paper; no to cat litter, diapers and plastic bottles). Buildings with more than nine units <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/contact/organics-collection-application> must apply for the program.


Is the compost program in jeopardy?


It’s certainly not a raging success. At this moment, the Sanitation Department is not on track to expand the program on time and has cut brown-bin pickup service from twice a week in some areas to once weekly, on recycling days. Service and pickup schedules have been experimental as the Sanitation Department tested behaviors, types of garbage trucks and routes, a Department spokeswoman said.


What was the problem with composting?


Low participation in the neighborhoods that took part in the pilot program led to inefficiencies and high costs, Ms. Garcia said. “We love composting,” said Kristin Brady, of Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, who uses the service every week. “But most of the people we know don’t compost because of cleaning the honestly somewhat gross outdoor brown bin.” A Department spokeswoman said that residents put only about 10 percent of their food scraps in the brown bins, throwing the rest in the garbage. Thus, garbage trucks with special compost compartments were running around with little to carry.


Why is participation so low?


Mr. Reynoso, who represents parts of Brooklyn, said he thinks the problem is a lack of advertising and education, and the fact that the program is voluntary. His efforts to increase the compost advertising budget have been unsuccessful, he said.

“Survey 10 people in New York City, and you would be hard-pressed to find a single person who knows how recycling works and how to make it work right, and what it means to the city financially,” Mr. Reynoso said. “In my building, we received the brown bins, and some fliers. I guarantee I’m the only person in my building who knows how to use them.”


What are the major hurdles?


“The biggest challenge is asking New Yorkers to do something different,” Ms. Garcia said. She told a story about how the department was handing out brown bins and an older man said that he didn’t want one.

“But we were handing out compost at the same time, and he definitely wanted the compost,” Ms. Garcia said. “We said, ‘We really need your banana peels in order to make this in the future.’ He took the brown bin.


Sign up for the New York Today Newsletter


Each morning, get the latest on New York businesses, arts, sports, dining, style and more.

SIGN UP

ADVERTISEMENT


Is there any good news?


New Yorkers are throwing out less trash. In 2017, the Sanitation Department collected 2.5 million tons of garbage destined for landfill, down from 2.8 million tons in 2005, even as the population grew.

While our residential recycling rate is quite low at 17 percent, New Yorkers are good recyclers of corrugated cardboard, for example (79 percent).


What about waste from businesses?


Businesses in New York City must pay to haul away their trash (an estimated 11 million tons of it every year). In 2017, large food service establishments and arenas were required to separate their food waste or face fines. In August of this year, the New York City Council <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/commercial-requirements> passed an ordinance to require large restaurants and hotels and large food manufacturers to separate out their food waste. Fines will begin in February.

Just this week, the city announced new rules that will require all private haulers picking up commercial waste to provide recycling and organics collection. Businesses will be incentivized. They will pay lower rates for food scrap and recycling pickups than they will for garbage, a spokeswoman for the Sanitation Dept. said.


Will composting come to high-rise apartment buildings?


It’s a work in progress. The Department of Sanitation says that 2,000 high rises throughout the five boroughs currently have brown bin service. An effort is underway to sign up more high rises in Manhattan and the South Bronx.

Council Member Ben Kallos represents the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The 168,000 residents in his district, the second largest in the city, mostly live in high rises. Mr. Kallos has proposed a measure that would mandate the mayor’s Zero Waste initiative to include targets and updates. The measure failed, and the effort to bring residential composting to his district has been frustrating, he said.

“We’ve worked with a number of residents and buildings to get composting,” Mr. Kallos said. “But I’ve yet to hear of any successes. I’ve never seen any brown bins in my district and I’d be surprised if there are any.”

ADVERTISEMENT

(A spokeswoman for the Department of Sanitation said that curbside service is available in all of Manhattan, including the Upper East Side, where 33 high-rise buildings have signed up for it.)


Is there a future for composting in New York City?


Experts are cautiously optimistic. Ms. Garcia said the city’s compost program is a priority, and the city remains dedicated to its Zero Waste goal. Ms. Garcia pointed out that residential compost collection is increasing. In 2017, the city collected 13,000 tons. In 2018, that amount grew to 43,000 tons (31,000 from brown bin pickups and another 12,000 from fall leaves, Greenmarket pickups and the Christmas tree recycling program).

“We’ve seen a lot of growth,” said Ms. Garcia, aided in large part by the work of nonprofits like the NYC Compost Project ( <http://nyc.gov/compostproject> nyc.gov/compostproject) and <https://www.grownyc.org/> GrowNYC, which provide food scrap drop-off sites at subway stops and at green markets.


Re: The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]

Kim Chaffee
 

Thanks, Kathleen, Ron, Mike et al. These are all good builds on this topic. What would be a specific action item or two for moving this forward with the NYC folks? Also, Kathleen, do you have any information on the Biomass Controls unit and project at RIT? Thanks again.

Kim

On Nov 13, 2018, at 12:36 PM, <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com> wrote:

Hi Kim et al –
I’m actually in discussions with some folks about piloting something like this including biochar (of course!) in Western NY. We are in the early planning stages but if it goes well we hope to be a demo site for others in NYS. There are (supposedly) regulations coming down in the next few years to restrict organics to landfill so there is a lot of attention being paid to alternatives at the moment. The Rochester Institute of Technology is at the forefront of educating policy makers about the benefits of thermochemical conversion. They will be hosting a seminar in March on food waste alternatives and will be showing off their Biomass Controls unit which they are currently using to carbonize different types of food waste.

Cheers
Kathleen


<image001.jpg>
Global best practices for biochar in agriculture, landscaping, reforestation, construction and more: https://www.biochar-journal.org/en

New articles about climate farming, wine growing and ecology in our Ithaka Journal: http://www.ithaka-journal.net/?lang=en
Biochar blogging at: http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/blog/

From: Ronal W. Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net <mailto:rongretlarson@comcast.net>>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:10 PM
To: biochar <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com>>; Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>>; Kathleen Draper <kdraper2@rochester.rr.com <mailto:kdraper2@rochester.rr.com>>
Subject: Re: [biochar] The Pros and Cons of New York’s Fledgling Compost Program: NY Times [3 Attachments]

Kim: cc List and Kathleen

I urge also adding the option of following Stockholm's lead with an emphasis on biochar. Look at the recent IBI webinar - organized by Kathleen. Former Mayor Bloomberg supplied seed funds and might want to do the same again.

Ron


On Nov 12, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>[biochar] <biochar@yahoogroups.com <mailto:biochar@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:

[Attachment(s) <x-msg://79/#TopText> from Kim Chaffee included below]


All,

It sounds like NYC would be open to guidance on composting. How could we integrate biochar into this program?

Kim Chaffee
Richmond, VA USA
Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com <mailto:Kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>



If successful, it could reduce landfill use and save the city millions. There are a few obstacles to work through first, though.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/nyregion/nyc-compost-zero-waste-program.html

Composting has such potential. It can reduce the garbage sent to landfills and save money at the same time. San Francisco claims to have reduced landfill usage by 80 percent, and Seoul, South Korea, a city of 10 million, claims that it saves $600,000 daily by charging residents and businesses fees for discarded food scraps.

But for New York City, where food scraps account for an estimated one-third of all garbage, composting is hardly making rapid or dramatic progress.

In 2015, Mayor Bill de Blasio introduced the “Zero Waste <https://www1.nyc.gov/site/sustainability/initiatives/zero-waste..page>” initiative, aiming for a 90 percent reduction in landfill use by 2030. A cornerstone of the plan was a robust compost program, where organic matter would be placed in brown bins provided by the city, picked up by the Sanitation Department, and then sold or delivered to places that turn the food into compost for gardening or convert it to energy. It is the largest compost program in the country, with brown bins for 3.5 million residents across the five boroughs, said Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.
But the program picked up only 43,000 tons of food scraps last year.

That’s about five percent of the city’s total food waste sent to landfills. For those following the Zero Waste target: We only have 85 percent more to go.
ADVERTISEMENT
The brown bin compost program, which started as a small pilot program on Staten Island in 2013, was expected to expand citywide by the end of this year. But the pickup service in some of the 24 neighborhoods where it is offered has been reduced and expansion plans have been delayed.

This leaves many New Yorkers wondering whether a composting program across the city will work. Here is an explanation of where things stand.

Go beyond the headlines.
Subscribe to The Times <https://www.nytimes.com/subscription/multiproduct/lp8HYKU.html?campaignId=7FUJ9>
How does composting save money?

The less we export to landfills, the more money we save.

The city will spend $411 million in 2019 to export about 2.5 million tons of residential, school and governmental trash to landfills located as far away as South Carolina. In 2014 the city spent $300 million. The export cost is expected to increase to $421 million by 2021.

“At this rate, we will be spending half a billion dollars,” said Antonio Reynoso, chairman of the City Council’s sanitation committee.

Is composting lucrative for the city?

Not yet. The compost program cost the city $15.7 million this year, and unlike recycling (which costs less to process than landfill waste, according to Mr. Reynoso), so far it doesn’t bring in much money. Last year, the city earned $58,000 from selling compost, according to the Sanitation Department. So there’s room for growth.
Editors’ Picks

<https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>
<00xp-1968news-slide-MDOJ-promo-square640-v9.gif> <https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>
50 Years Later, It Feels Familiar: How America Fractured in 1968 <https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/01/15/us/1968-history.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=478680122>
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>
<04BARBETTA1-square640.jpg> <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>
The Elegant Relic of Restaurant Row <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/02/nyregion/the-elegant-relic-of-restaurant-row.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=422186204>
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>
<00lyric-hppromo-square640-v3.jpg> <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>
The Bright Future and Grim Death of a Privileged Hollywood Daughter  <https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/14/nyregion/lyric-mchenry-death.html?fallback=0&recId=1Cu9eNhRdHHWln7MZO9JJjN2J9l&locked=0&geoContinent=NA&geoRegion=VA&recAlloc=contextual-bandit-story-geo&geoCountry=US&blockId=signature-journalism-vi&imp_id=323752143>

ADVERTISEMENT
Who currently gets the brown bins?

Buildings with nine or fewer units in the community districts where there is curbside service <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/residents/current-organics-rollout> automatically receive brown bins, along with information on what can go in them (yes to meat and bones and coffee grounds and food-soiled paper; no to cat litter, diapers and plastic bottles). Buildings with more than nine units must apply <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/contact/organics-collection-application> for the program.
Is the compost program in jeopardy?

It’s certainly not a raging success. At this moment, the Sanitation Department is not on track to expand the program on time and has cut brown-bin pickup service from twice a week in some areas to once weekly, on recycling days. Service and pickup schedules have been experimental as the Sanitation Department tested behaviors, types of garbage trucks and routes, a Department spokeswoman said.

What was the problem with composting?

Low participation in the neighborhoods that took part in the pilot program led to inefficiencies and high costs, Ms. Garcia said. “We love composting,” said Kristin Brady, of Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, who uses the service every week. “But most of the people we know don’t compost because of cleaning the honestly somewhat gross outdoor brown bin.” A Department spokeswoman said that residents put only about 10 percent of their food scraps in the brown bins, throwing the rest in the garbage. Thus, garbage trucks with special compost compartments were running around with little to carry.

Why is participation so low?

Mr. Reynoso, who represents parts of Brooklyn, said he thinks the problem is a lack of advertising and education, and the fact that the program is voluntary. His efforts to increase the compost advertising budget have been unsuccessful, he said.

“Survey 10 people in New York City, and you would be hard-pressed to find a single person who knows how recycling works and how to make it work right, and what it means to the city financially,” Mr. Reynoso said. “In my building, we received the brown bins, and some fliers. I guarantee I’m the only person in my building who knows how to use them.”

What are the major hurdles?

“The biggest challenge is asking New Yorkers to do something different,” Ms. Garcia said. She told a story about how the department was handing out brown bins and an older man said that he didn’t want one.

“But we were handing out compost at the same time, and he definitely wanted the compost,” Ms. Garcia said. “We said, ‘We really need your banana peels in order to make this in the future.’ He took the brown bin.
Sign up for the New York Today Newsletter
Each morning, get the latest on New York businesses, arts, sports, dining, style and more.

SIGN UP
ADVERTISEMENT
Is there any good news?

New Yorkers are throwing out less trash. In 2017, the Sanitation Department collected 2.5 million tons of garbage destined for landfill, down from 2.8 million tons in 2005, even as the population grew.

While our residential recycling rate is quite low at 17 percent, New Yorkers are good recyclers of corrugated cardboard, for example (79 percent).

What about waste from businesses?

Businesses in New York City must pay to haul away their trash (an estimated 11 million tons of it every year). In 2017, large food service establishments and arenas were required to separate their food waste or face fines. In August of this year, the New York City Council passed an ordinance <https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/commercial-requirements> to require large restaurants and hotels and large food manufacturers to separate out their food waste. Fines will begin in February.
Just this week, the city announced new rules that will require all private haulers picking up commercial waste to provide recycling and organics collection. Businesses will be incentivized. They will pay lower rates for food scrap and recycling pickups than they will for garbage, a spokeswoman for the Sanitation Dept. said.

Will composting come to high-rise apartment buildings?

It’s a work in progress. The Department of Sanitation says that 2,000 high rises throughout the five boroughs currently have brown bin service. An effort is underway to sign up more high rises in Manhattan and the South Bronx.

Council Member Ben Kallos represents the Upper East Side of Manhattan. The 168,000 residents in his district, the second largest in the city, mostly live in high rises. Mr. Kallos has proposed a measure that would mandate the mayor’s Zero Waste initiative to include targets and updates. The measure failed, and the effort to bring residential composting to his district has been frustrating, he said.

“We’ve worked with a number of residents and buildings to get composting,” Mr. Kallos said. “But I’ve yet to hear of any successes. I’ve never seen any brown bins in my district and I’d be surprised if there are any.”
ADVERTISEMENT
(A spokeswoman for the Department of Sanitation said that curbside service is available in all of Manhattan, including the Upper East Side, where 33 high-rise buildings have signed up for it.)

Is there a future for composting in New York City?

Experts are cautiously optimistic. Ms. Garcia said the city’s compost program is a priority, and the city remains dedicated to its Zero Waste goal. Ms. Garcia pointed out that residential compost collection is increasing. In 2017, the city collected 13,000 tons. In 2018, that amount grew to 43,000 tons (31,000 from brown bin pickups and another 12,000 from fall leaves, Greenmarket pickups and the Christmas tree recycling program).

“We’ve seen a lot of growth,” said Ms. Garcia, aided in large part by the work of nonprofits like the NYC Compost Project (nyc.gov/compostproject <http://nyc.gov/compostproject>) and GrowNYC <https://www.grownyc.org/>, which provide food scrap drop-off sites at subway stops and at green markets.

9061 - 9080 of 32981