Date   

Re: Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use #flamecap

David Yarrow
 

hello all,

i have an urgent suggestion:
when designing and building a flame-cap kiln, 
if you're gonna quench that bed of hot coals, 
DO NOT DUMP THE LIQUID.
instead, capture that darkened fluid and save it.
it is a precious resource with multiple amazing uses.
anyone serious about plant & soil culture will discover quench water 
has special properties & dramatic effects on soils, microbea, plants & fertilizrs.

quench has a wide assortment of every size carbon molecules 
– fragments shattered & splintered off the charred biomass.
– from nanocarbon micromolecules up to larger macromolecules
suspended & dissolved in the water, with a mix of plant friendly minerals.

these biocarbon fragments were cooked at high temperature
– essentially pyrolyzed under the flame cap in low oxygen atmosphere 
– thoroughly reduced, stripped of oxygen & electrons
– with lots of sharp edges and points to collect & focus electric charge.

think of this as a char equivalent to humic & fulvic extracts from humates, 
but even better.
this kind of polycyclic biocarbon is very water-friendly; the two will blend nicely, 
improving the characteristics each.

any foliar spray or compost tea will benefit from a dose of this microcarbon solution, 
and will capture, hold, carry & deliver any liquid nutrients added, 
especially ions, and increase mobility into plant tissue.
think of this liquid carbon as a base matrix to add other substances to.
plants can drink in this ultrafine carbon to circulate inside; 
any larger carbon molecules with leave a nanofine film on the leaves 
– seems to act like sunshade (optical) & insulation (thermal).

spray or drench soil with this solution will get excellent penetration 
even heavy, tight clay will get optimum carbon movement to alter soil structure.
actually, tiny bit of ultrafine clay will enhance this substance,
especially for sandy soil (think desert).

understanding the potential benefit & value of this liquid nano & micro carbon molecules, 
it makes sense to design equipment to efficiently create & capture this quench fluid.
some way to drain it off easily, efficiently into a container.
then design simple screen operations to sieve out different grades of carbon material.
collection & capture of this range of carbon molecules is affected by water's vorticity.
another product development challenge is to create concentrated nano & microchar solutions.
or to create dried, graded nano & micro char powders.
but hey, you gotta alot of heat coming off your kiln;  
put that heat to use boiling down solutions; 
i flash on the design maple or molasses syrup boiler tables/benches, 
with steam rising off a thin fluid film flowing over a metal evaporator. 

for a green & peaceful planet,
david yarrow


On Sun, Dec 8, 2019 at 2:10 PM Kelpie Wilson <kelpiew@...> wrote:
Hi all,
There are a few different ways to go here. First consideration needs to be quenching. How will you put it out? With no solid bottom, you cannot flood quench. Your options will be to snuff it with a lid and dirt to seal the edges, or to open the kiln at the end, dump the char, spread it thin while spraying with a hose.

We came up with a design called the Ring of Fire that uses three curved steel panels to make a cylinder. There are flanges that you clamp together to make it air tight. It has a lid for snuffing and it works very well because it is made to close tolerances so it does not leak air (won't hold water though). However, it cost $1000 to make. You can do the same thing with sheets of roofing bolted together to make a cylinder, but you can't snuff quench it because it leaks air.
Open source plans for the Ring of Fire are up at wilsonbiochar.com

Cylinders are actually very nice for making biochar. The tall walls act like an afterburner, holding heat in, so they often burn much cleaner than a trough or shallower pan like the Oregon Kiln. See the work of Dolph Cook in Australia.

We also have some folks who are using flat steel panels, heavier gauge than roofing steel, that they bolt together into polygon shapes - hexagon or octagon.
Those work fine and can be very large, but same problem with quenching. The only way to do it is to open the kiln, spread thin and spray with water. I will try to get some pictures of those up on wilsonbiochar.com. I will try to get to that this evening. 

-Kelpie


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Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890
Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Tom Miles
 

Anaerobic Digestion

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:47 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Ta Tom, what does AD stand for please?

On 11 Dec 2019, at 2:42 pm, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

You will find that there is work on using pyrolysis to treat PFAS especially above 500C. I am sure that we will see more data roll out. 

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 7:45 PM, pdmac via Groups.Io <pdmac@...> wrote:

The new concern with bio-solids is PFAS the ‘forever chemical.’  

Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands
Experts are raising concerns that sewage sludge used as fertilizer around the U.S. could contaminate crops with potentially harmful chemicals
By
JOHN FLESHER and MICHAEL CASEY Associated Press
September 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

But state inspectors ordered a halt to the practice in 2017 after learning the material was laced with one of the potentially harmful chemicals known collectively as PFAS, which are turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S… 

Paul


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:25 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system. 
 
Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      
 
Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.
 
Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects. 
 
Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.
 
We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work. 
 
Tom



Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Geoff Thomas
 

Ta Tom, what does AD stand for please?

On 11 Dec 2019, at 2:42 pm, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

You will find that there is work on using pyrolysis to treat PFAS especially above 500C. I am sure that we will see more data roll out. 

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 7:45 PM, pdmac via Groups.Io <pdmac@...> wrote:

The new concern with bio-solids is PFAS the ‘forever chemical.’  

Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands
Experts are raising concerns that sewage sludge used as fertilizer around the U.S. could contaminate crops with potentially harmful chemicals
By
JOHN FLESHER and MICHAEL CASEY Associated Press
September 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

But state inspectors ordered a halt to the practice in 2017 after learning the material was laced with one of the potentially harmful chemicals known collectively as PFAS, which are turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S… 

Paul


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:25 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system. 
 
Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      
 
Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.
 
Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects. 
 
Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.
 
We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work. 
 
Tom



Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Tom Miles
 

AD makes sense and is usually the first stage of treatment. Convert the volatiles to gas and deal with the digestate. Or use hydrothermal processes which have also proven useful with PFAS and make useful Biochars. Biosolids chars are usually 10-20% carbon so the mineral composition is key. 

Tom

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 8:55 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Tom, your reply seems to have knocked mine out, but respectfully I suggest mine is worthwhile also, as I always come back to Basic principles. 

I believe that this is an important topic, the quantities of substance world wide are Huge.

There are two ways we currently know of to deal with un-recyclable waste, basically wet or dry.
Without prejudice for our favourite method, - Pyrolysis and amending the resultant charcoal, and hopefully using the gas produced to do helpful work, there is also the technique of Aneorobic digestion, - I go back  50 years to the GOBAR GAS units in Gudjerat in India created by the Ghandians at that time, my wife was doing their accounts, and now Many Thousands all over India and China and God knows where else.
Simple to say, Wet for Aneorobic Dry for Aerobic, and this is not the time in the evolution of humankind that we support one or the other like a football team, we must support the Best option.
 So, assuming that wet sewage is, as seems, best for aneorobic digestion, yet has been poisoned by the ever present maniacal 701 Billionaires America is struggling to support in their Aristocratic lifestyle, what is the best way to remove those poisons? 
Again, two ways seem to offer, Dry then Pyrolise the sewage, or, Add charcoal to the digestate.
Consequences that I see, Pyrolising the digestate requires a lot of energy, and also destroys a lot of helpful chemicals such as nitrogen in that digestate and the Micro - organisms also, - always a major factor, but does it destroy/remove the poisons? or if not, does the charcoal/biochar destroy/sequester the poisons?  (which) and, a third and vital question arises, what happens with the poisons then?
Hoping to help by removing any rivalry, we have zero time for that.

On 11 Dec 2019, at 2:42 pm, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

You will find that there is work on using pyrolysis to treat PFAS especially above 500C. I am sure that we will see more data roll out. 

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 7:45 PM, pdmac via Groups.Io <pdmac@...> wrote:

The new concern with bio-solids is PFAS the ‘forever chemical.’  

Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands
Experts are raising concerns that sewage sludge used as fertilizer around the U.S. could contaminate crops with potentially harmful chemicals
By
JOHN FLESHER and MICHAEL CASEY Associated Press
September 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

But state inspectors ordered a halt to the practice in 2017 after learning the material was laced with one of the potentially harmful chemicals known collectively as PFAS, which are turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S… 

Paul


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:25 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system. 
 
Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      
 
Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.
 
Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects. 
 
Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.
 
We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work. 
 
Tom



Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Tom, your reply seems to have knocked mine out, but respectfully I suggest mine is worthwhile also, as I always come back to Basic principles. 

I believe that this is an important topic, the quantities of substance world wide are Huge.

There are two ways we currently know of to deal with un-recyclable waste, basically wet or dry.
Without prejudice for our favourite method, - Pyrolysis and amending the resultant charcoal, and hopefully using the gas produced to do helpful work, there is also the technique of Aneorobic digestion, - I go back  50 years to the GOBAR GAS units in Gudjerat in India created by the Ghandians at that time, my wife was doing their accounts, and now Many Thousands all over India and China and God knows where else.
Simple to say, Wet for Aneorobic Dry for Aerobic, and this is not the time in the evolution of humankind that we support one or the other like a football team, we must support the Best option.
 So, assuming that wet sewage is, as seems, best for aneorobic digestion, yet has been poisoned by the ever present maniacal 701 Billionaires America is struggling to support in their Aristocratic lifestyle, what is the best way to remove those poisons? 
Again, two ways seem to offer, Dry then Pyrolise the sewage, or, Add charcoal to the digestate.
Consequences that I see, Pyrolising the digestate requires a lot of energy, and also destroys a lot of helpful chemicals such as nitrogen in that digestate and the Micro - organisms also, - always a major factor, but does it destroy/remove the poisons? or if not, does the charcoal/biochar destroy/sequester the poisons?  (which) and, a third and vital question arises, what happens with the poisons then?
Hoping to help by removing any rivalry, we have zero time for that.

On 11 Dec 2019, at 2:42 pm, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

You will find that there is work on using pyrolysis to treat PFAS especially above 500C. I am sure that we will see more data roll out. 

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 7:45 PM, pdmac via Groups.Io <pdmac@...> wrote:

The new concern with bio-solids is PFAS the ‘forever chemical.’  

Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands
Experts are raising concerns that sewage sludge used as fertilizer around the U.S. could contaminate crops with potentially harmful chemicals
By
JOHN FLESHER and MICHAEL CASEY Associated Press
September 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

But state inspectors ordered a halt to the practice in 2017 after learning the material was laced with one of the potentially harmful chemicals known collectively as PFAS, which are turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S… 

Paul


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:25 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system. 
 
Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      
 
Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.
 
Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects. 
 
Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.
 
We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work. 
 
Tom



Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Tom Miles
 

You will find that there is work on using pyrolysis to treat PFAS especially above 500C. I am sure that we will see more data roll out. 

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 10, 2019, at 7:45 PM, pdmac via Groups.Io <pdmac@...> wrote:

The new concern with bio-solids is PFAS the ‘forever chemical.’  

Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands
Experts are raising concerns that sewage sludge used as fertilizer around the U.S. could contaminate crops with potentially harmful chemicals
By
JOHN FLESHER and MICHAEL CASEY Associated Press
September 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

But state inspectors ordered a halt to the practice in 2017 after learning the material was laced with one of the potentially harmful chemicals known collectively as PFAS, which are turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S… 

Paul


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:25 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system. 
 
Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      
 
Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.
 
Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects. 
 
Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.
 
We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work. 
 
Tom


Re: Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use #flamecap

Kelpie Wilson
 

Oh sorry. Try this one 
https://photos.app.goo.gl/nN5uU8dn682AnHcA6

--
Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890
Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Paul McCullough
 

The new concern with bio-solids is PFAS the ‘forever chemical.’  

Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands
Experts are raising concerns that sewage sludge used as fertilizer around the U.S. could contaminate crops with potentially harmful chemicals
By
JOHN FLESHER and MICHAEL CASEY Associated Press
September 12, 2019, 12:29 PM

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

But state inspectors ordered a halt to the practice in 2017 after learning the material was laced with one of the potentially harmful chemicals known collectively as PFAS, which are turning up in drinking water and some foods across the U.S… 

Paul


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:25 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system. 
 
Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      
 
Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.
 
Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects. 
 
Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.
 
We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work. 
 
Tom


Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Tom Miles
 

Bioforcetech in redwood city uses the Pyreg.de technology. Pyreg has about 30 small systems in operation. I think four are processing sewage sludge. There may be more. Bioforcetech has coupled the Pyreg system with their proprietary biological drying system.

 

Not all biosolids contain heavy metals, at least not in toxic concentrations. We have found that biosolids from industrial sources are very different than biosolids from residential sources. USDA Agricultural research Service scientist Steve Vaughn, Research Plant  Physiologist at Peoria, Illinois, reviewed biochars from biosolids in a recent paper. He advocates biochar from biosolids for use on golf courses.      

 

Jesper Ahrenfeldt, Danish technological University, recently posted information on LinkedIn about Aquagreen, an offshoot from DTU that has developed a system for converting biosolids to biochar. DTU has developed some very useful pyrolysis and gasification technology over the las 25 years.

 

Anaergia, a wastewater treatment company, carbonized dried biosolids for a year in Encinitas, California, using the French Biogreen Energy technology. The condition of the carbonizer looked very good after a year of operation. There were apparently problems with the biosolids dryer. Dryers are the usual problem area with biosolids as we have found on several projects.

 

Andritz makes an excellent biosolids dryer. We found that municipal biosolids dried in an Andritz dryer made the “best” pyrolysis feedstock according to the developer of the carbonizer.

 

We have technology options and knowledge about the composition and use of biochars from biosolids. Let’s put them to work.

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Bartlett
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 4:17 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate

 

I know Biomass Tech has a facility in Redwood City California, but I haven’t seen it yet.

 

If the char will be used in the soil, the heavy metals in the biosolids are important, they will remain in the char.

 

jb

Sent from my mobile



On Dec 10, 2019, at 2:29 PM, Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert@...> wrote:



Vermont has a chronic problem with waster water, sewage, and digestate from water treatment facilities. These problems are primarily blamed on untreated municipal waste water. These plants are also a major source of nitrous oxide and other GHC.  

I’ve been speaking to others about banning the practice of trucking sewage or wet digestate to land fills 75 to 100 miles away and instead setting up regional facilities that would de-water and pyrolyze it. For example, ~ 20,000 people in Montpelier and Barre (and our suburbs!) might ship by rail to a central facility in Barre, located within an economic development/New markets tax area — financed privately by people with tax-appetite -- and enter an off-taker agreement with an option to buy-out after the tax incentives ended.

 

I’ve visited Biomass Controls in Connecticut. They work with dairy farms -- but their systems are too small to handle municipal sewage.

I’ve spoken with Aeries which is building a large plant in New Jersey -- but they’re too large. 

 

So here’s my question: can anyone offer comments about the technology offered by Biomass Tech  (www.bioforcetech.com), which offers a modular system of rotary dryers and pyrolysis/gas system? They design it to scale, build it in California in ~6 months and assemble and test it before shipping. It is re-assembled on site by a typical commercial construction company. 


The system is designed to produce gas, but its big benefit is waste volume reduction, sequestration of pollutants, and elimination of transportation of-site plus tipping fees.

Any comments are appreciated!


Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Jim Bartlett
 

I know Biomass Tech has a facility in Redwood City California, but I haven’t seen it yet.

If the char will be used in the soil, the heavy metals in the biosolids are important, they will remain in the char.

jb
Sent from my mobile

On Dec 10, 2019, at 2:29 PM, Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert@...> wrote:


Vermont has a chronic problem with waster water, sewage, and digestate from water treatment facilities. These problems are primarily blamed on untreated municipal waste water. These plants are also a major source of nitrous oxide and other GHC.  

I’ve been speaking to others about banning the practice of trucking sewage or wet digestate to land fills 75 to 100 miles away and instead setting up regional facilities that would de-water and pyrolyze it. For example, ~ 20,000 people in Montpelier and Barre (and our suburbs!) might ship by rail to a central facility in Barre, located within an economic development/New markets tax area — financed privately by people with tax-appetite -- and enter an off-taker agreement with an option to buy-out after the tax incentives ended.
 
I’ve visited Biomass Controls in Connecticut. They work with dairy farms -- but their systems are too small to handle municipal sewage.

I’ve spoken with Aeries which is building a large plant in New Jersey -- but they’re too large. 
 
So here’s my question: can anyone offer comments about the technology offered by Biomass Tech  (www.bioforcetech.com), which offers a modular system of rotary dryers and pyrolysis/gas system? They design it to scale, build it in California in ~6 months and assemble and test it before shipping. It is re-assembled on site by a typical commercial construction company. 

The system is designed to produce gas, but its big benefit is waste volume reduction, sequestration of pollutants, and elimination of transportation of-site plus tipping fees.

Any comments are appreciated!


Re: Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Dick Gallien
 

Forty four yrs. ago I put an old 2000 ga. tank on a 10 T farm wagon
and pulled hundreds of wagon loads the 2 mi. from Winona's new sewage
plant to this farm. It was 6% solids, looked like black oil and
turned corn and pastures green, until MPCA warned us that it contained
a high rate of PCB's and our dau. was on the way.

I mentioned this story a few yrs. ago and Tom Miles told of his
involvement with the Milwaukee system. With all of their industry,
how do they deal with the toxins?
https://www.milorganite.com/using-milorganite/what-is-milorganite

On 12/10/19, Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
Vermont has a chronic problem with waster water, sewage, and digestate from
water treatment facilities. These problems are primarily blamed on untreated
municipal waste water. These plants are also a major source of nitrous oxide
and other GHC.

I’ve been speaking to others about banning the practice of trucking sewage
or wet digestate to land fills 75 to 100 miles away and instead setting up
regional facilities that would de-water and pyrolyze it. For example, ~
20,000 people in Montpelier and Barre (and our suburbs!) might ship by rail
to a central facility in Barre, located within an economic development/New
markets tax area — financed privately by people with tax-appetite -- and
enter an off-taker agreement with an option to buy-out after the tax
incentives ended.

I’ve visited Biomass Controls in Connecticut. They work with dairy farms --
but their systems are too small to handle municipal sewage.

I’ve spoken with Aeries which is building a large plant in New Jersey -- but
they’re too large.

So here’s my question: can anyone offer comments about the technology
offered by Biomass Tech  ( *www.bioforcetech.com* ), which offers a modular
system of rotary dryers and pyrolysis/gas system? They design it to scale,
build it in California in ~6 months and assemble and test it before
shipping. It is re-assembled on site by a typical commercial construction
company.

The system is designed to produce gas, but its big benefit is waste volume
reduction, sequestration of pollutants, and elimination of transportation
of-site plus tipping fees.

Any comments are appreciated!



--
Dick Gallien
22501 East Burns Valley Road
Winona MN 55987
dickgallien@gmail.com [507] 312 0194
www.thefarm.winona-mn.us

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not
possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures,
questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education,
while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the
imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that
there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose
of their confinement, it is too late.


Pyrolyzing Sewage Sludge & Digestate #biosolids #digestate

Robert Lehmert
 

Vermont has a chronic problem with waster water, sewage, and digestate from water treatment facilities. These problems are primarily blamed on untreated municipal waste water. These plants are also a major source of nitrous oxide and other GHC.  

I’ve been speaking to others about banning the practice of trucking sewage or wet digestate to land fills 75 to 100 miles away and instead setting up regional facilities that would de-water and pyrolyze it. For example, ~ 20,000 people in Montpelier and Barre (and our suburbs!) might ship by rail to a central facility in Barre, located within an economic development/New markets tax area — financed privately by people with tax-appetite -- and enter an off-taker agreement with an option to buy-out after the tax incentives ended.
 
I’ve visited Biomass Controls in Connecticut. They work with dairy farms -- but their systems are too small to handle municipal sewage.

I’ve spoken with Aeries which is building a large plant in New Jersey -- but they’re too large. 
 
So here’s my question: can anyone offer comments about the technology offered by Biomass Tech  (www.bioforcetech.com), which offers a modular system of rotary dryers and pyrolysis/gas system? They design it to scale, build it in California in ~6 months and assemble and test it before shipping. It is re-assembled on site by a typical commercial construction company. 

The system is designed to produce gas, but its big benefit is waste volume reduction, sequestration of pollutants, and elimination of transportation of-site plus tipping fees.

Any comments are appreciated!


IBI Member Discount Join Today!: North America’s Largest Biomass Event - View General Session Speakers – Save with Early Bird– View Agenda #conference #discount

Tom Miles
 


 

Save Now on Registration
Early Bird Ends January 8th, 2020

 



General Session Preview
Tuesday, February 4 (8:30 am - 11:00 am)


Biomass Magazine’s Annual Conversation
with Association Leaders


Tim Portz, Executive Director, Pellet Fuels Institute


Jeff Serfass, Executive Director, Biomass Thermal Energy
Council


Patrick Serfass, Executive Director, American Biogas Council


Bob Cleaves, President & CEO, Biomass Power Association

 

 


 

Expo Hall Has Expanded

North America’s Largest Biomass Event
Join us in Nashville – Become an Exhibitor or Sponsor

Attendees of the 2020 Biomass Conference & Expo seek solutions to the everyday challenges they face. When you purchase a booth, you're not just buying real estate in the exhibit hall, you're becoming part of the most comprehensive and dynamic event available in this dynamic industry. In addition to booth space, all exhibitors receive complimentary marketing through promotional e-mails and brochures, onsite program guide, conference Web site and online exhibitor list. Be a part of the event defining the industry for years to come. Reserve your booth space today!

 

 


 

Waste-to-Energy Industry Tour

Thursday, February 6 (8:00 am - 4:00 pm)
Cost: $150.00*
*Additional registration is required

 

Aries Clean Energy and WastAway Fuels

 

 


 

Book Accommodations

Welcome to the Gaylord Opryland® Resort
& Convention Center

 

Limited Availability!
To receive the International Biomass Conference Discount Rate you must reserve your room by December 31, 2019!  

 

 

 


 

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BBI International · 308 Second Ave. N. · Suite 304 · Grand Forks, ND 58203 · USA


Re: Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use #flamecap

Teel, Wayne
 

Kelpie,

 

The link did not work, at least not on my computer.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kelpie Wilson
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2019 2:08 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use

 

Yes you can tow kilns around. Here is one way. Not sure I recommend it, but it worked:

https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipOnnNLYwF97iiTjqjjFgL2NWSge9dhfM5vtFbS_


 

--

Ms.Kelpie Wilson
Wilson Biochar Associates

Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890

Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


Re: Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use #flamecap

Kelpie Wilson
 

Oh yes and I think I remember seeing a picture of a flame kiln with wheels from Odette Varela Milla Ph.D. Odette are you on this list? Can you share?

--
Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890
Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


US National Academy of Sciences: Negative Emissions Technologies & Reliable Sequestration: A Research Agenda (2019) #climate #emissions

Kim Chaffee
 

All,

Thought you might want to see this new 2019 research report from the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering & Medicine.  The section on biochar can be found in Chapter 3, Terrestrial Carbon Removal and Sequestration on pages 104 and 105.  

Biochar is also included in chapter 4, Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration, under the heading biomass thermochemical conversion to fuel with biochar soil amendment.  See pages 148 and 149.    

You can download the whole report or just the chapters in which you are interested for FREE.  Biochar is part of chapter 3, together with Chapter 4.  My guess is that this study will be updated periodically.  What can we do to improve the sections on biochar?  Thanks.

Kim  




You received this email faster as the sender used productivity features of Mailbutler.


Re: Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use #flamecap

Kelpie Wilson
 

Yes you can tow kilns around. Here is one way. Not sure I recommend it, but it worked:
https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipOnnNLYwF97iiTjqjjFgL2NWSge9dhfM5vtFbS_


--
Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890
Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


Re: Properties of Various Biochars; Was: RE: [Biochar] Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use #flamecap

Eli Fishpaw
 

When you say 10% is biochar is ideal, what depth of soil defines this proportion?  Obviously, the deeper you consider, the more char that is needed.  My guess is 6".  Congratulations on your success.  I hope to duplicate.  

Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Norm Baker [mailto:ntbakerphd@...]
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Sent: Mon, 9 Dec 2019 20:54:44 -0800
Subject: Re: Properties of Various Biochars; Was: RE: [Biochar] Portable, dismantlable, trough flame cap, for farm scale use

We have been adding biochar in the fall to a garden plot for several years until we reached the ideal 10%, It was always quenched, not loaded with nutrients and not crushed. After a winter of adsorbing whatever nutrients it could from the soil and some chicken manure, the following spring we did a soil test at Logan Labs to see what nutrients were needed and we applied those needed nutrients. Our garden success has been phenomenal. 
 
Norm


Gordon West
 

Thanks, Robert.

I am assuming that the char-making was in a closed retort and not a TLUD or flame-cap pyrolyzer. Some important differences exist between the three techniques relating to syngas residence time in the newly created char. I have never used a closed retort, but have wondered how the gasified volatiles get out to leave clean char.

In a batch type TLUD, the migrating pyrolysis front results in the syngas passing through a gradually deepening bed of char with a gradient of temperature as it cools while rising out of the cylinder. Add to that the char on the top has all of the syngas passing through it, while at the bottom it has only a small amount. We suspect that some syngas condenses out and back into the char, but we have not yet tested it.

In our continuous process TLUD, the layer of char on the top stays the same thickness, which we can reduce to a few inches, so syngas residence time and cooling are reduced (and made consistent throughout the char). The assumption is that this technique minimizes any syngas condensation back into the char.

Gordon West






On Dec 10, 2019, at 8:48 AM, ROBERT W GILLETT <themarvalus.wabio@...> wrote:

Table 1 shows a range of ~300 °C < HTT < ~500 °C.


Eli Fishpaw
 

I am still a novice that lurks on this list with real pros.  I am hesitant to enter the conversation.  However, I am moving towards producing biochar for farm garden application.  The article referenced in previous message highlights concerns about adverse impacts of "Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFR)" which are surface stabilized metal-radical complexes that are formed from the so-called “products of incomplete combustion”.  They claim, "EPFRs can induce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which poses huge agro-environmental and human health risks."  I have believed that the higher the temperature of pyrolysis, the better the lattice structure of the char, less tar, creosote. 

Though it sites incomplete combustion as the source of EPFR, the chart on page 4 say little EPFR at pyrolysis below 300C.  But high EPFR from 300C - 500C (Amorphous char stage) increases EPFR.  However, above that, EPFR decreases or is eliminated.  So it is not flat line hotter is better.  

The technical language in article is difficult for me to comprehend.  I am wondering what the impact is of "reactive oxygen species".

I hope you pros can explore the legitimacy of this concern and possibly ways to address it.  The article does not reject biochar out of hand.  They are wanting to develop an enforceable standard for regulation.  Is this warranted?  

Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: ROBERT W GILLETT [mailto:themarvalus.wabio@...]
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Sent: Tue, 10 Dec 2019 06:31:09 -0800
Subject: [Biochar] EFPRs #biochar #environment

An open access article I came across in creating the monthly IBI digest seems to point to mid-temperature range chars as a major environmental hazard. 

Odinga, ES et al. “Occurrence, Formation, Environmental Fate and Risks of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals in Biochars.” Elsevier. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412019324845 Highlights: “EPFR formation in biochars is affected by pyrolytic conditions and feedstock type. Biochar-related [reactive oxygen species] from pyrolysis may cause huge environmental and human risks. Scientific and regulatory issues concerning their formation is a global threat. Recommendations are proposed to mitigate the drawbacks of EPFRs in biochars.”

Robert Gillett

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