Date   

Re: You must watch this #education #video

Nadav Ziv
 

Ii is only for canada adresses...

בתאריך שבת, 28 בדצמ׳ 2019, 08:02, מאת Ron Larson ‏<rongretlarson@...>:

Norm and biochar list (changed address away from yahoo;   dropped the ag forum because I wasn’t sure I am on there)


RWL:   Thanks for the alert.   I agree this is a “must”.  Main character is “Biochap” (first time I’ve seen that name.).

At this site,  I learned this is a freebie.  Designed for grades 4-8.  All Canadian based, but they service any country.

Main message is finding a use for waste - not one we normally see for biochar.

Ron


On Dec 27, 2019, at 10:08 PM, Norman Baker ntbakerphd@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 
__,_._,___


Re: You must watch this #education #video

Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...>
 

Norm, Ron, biochar list, 
Indeed, a fantastic video, with the 'use for waste' very important message, a forgotten co-benefits of biochar production. 
Thank you, regards, Benoit

Le 28 déc. 2019 à 01:02, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> a écrit :

Norm and biochar list (changed address away from yahoo;   dropped the ag forum because I wasn’t sure I am on there)


RWL:   Thanks for the alert.   I agree this is a “must”.  Main character is “Biochap” (first time I’ve seen that name.).

At this site,  I learned this is a freebie.  Designed for grades 4-8.  All Canadian based, but they service any country.

Main message is finding a use for waste - not one we normally see for biochar.

Ron


On Dec 27, 2019, at 10:08 PM, Norman Baker ntbakerphd@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 
__,_._,___



Re: You must watch this #education #video

Ron Larson
 

Norm and biochar list (changed address away from yahoo;   dropped the ag forum because I wasn’t sure I am on there)


RWL:   Thanks for the alert.   I agree this is a “must”.  Main character is “Biochap” (first time I’ve seen that name.).

At this site,  I learned this is a freebie.  Designed for grades 4-8.  All Canadian based, but they service any country.

Main message is finding a use for waste - not one we normally see for biochar.

Ron


On Dec 27, 2019, at 10:08 PM, Norman Baker ntbakerphd@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 
__,_._,___


Re: Waste cardboard, paper, newspaper, as feedstock #feedstock

Ron Larson
 

Shaked From:  cc list

Thanks a great deal.    See inserts.


On Dec 27, 2019, at 3:27 AM, Shaked From <shakedfrom@...> wrote:

Hi Rob,
thanks for the questions, I’ll try to answer best I can.
I’m also just about to run another burn as material is piling up, I’ll be able to share more pictures, what is the best way to do that?
[RWL:   Doing same is fine by me.

I’m sharing land with an organic market gardener, and waste cardboard seem to be an abundant resource.

in terms of your questions:
1. The picture with the bones at the bottom was aimed at showing the bottom of the kiln, I don’t tend to place the bones at the bottom as it’s the place receiving least heat, and bones do not seem to char well there.
[RWL:   Gotcha.  See note below on possible BLDD to replace TLUD operation - which would keep the bones low.

2. I usually start with a bottom layer of sticks, to make sure that the flatness of paper does not block any air intake, the sticks allow even distribution of air. The picture showing the sticks also shows the next layer up of rolled cardboard, starting the stacking from the outside and not yet complete in the center, the sticks are only at the bottom layer.
      [RWL:  I thought I was looking at topmost layer.  Thanks for noting this.

3. Stacking the rolls of cardboard, paper, newspaper works well, and does not seem to matter upright or horizontal.

4. Nut shells or tree bark when available work well as a complete layer.
[RWL:   Intresting that you think in terms of layers.  I have not previously heard that.

5. Bones, egg shells, fruit stones, avocado skins and other such material seem to char best scattered evenly through the paper/ cardboard mass in the top part of the drum.

6. In terms of the design of the kiln, I have seen ‘aqueous solutions’ using both of the approaches, the 2nd drum as a chimney or a third of a drum attached to a flue as a chimney, I chose the later as I had the flue and it seemed lighter and easier to remove at the end of the burn.
i followed their design exactly, and I am very happy with it, I have used TLUDs before, and this one is the cleanest burn homemade TLUD I have constructed and used.

7. Regarding the question about my satisfaction with the resulted char... I’m not sure, which is why I shared this material to start with.
its all charred right through, including the bones, has no smell or taste, washes off easily with a bit of water, soaks up liquid well, and powders without effort, but I had not managed to find any information on the structural characteristics of paper/cardboard char, and I had not run any field trials.

i have been using that char in 2 main ways:
1. Mixed with grass clippings or wood shavings in our composting toilets, so every time someone does their thing they add a handful of the mix into the chamber, once full it sits for six months to decompose, red worms are abundant in the chamber too, after six months the compost is used in the garden or as part of seed raising mix.

2. Our family lives from the farm animals and our garden, and urine is an important resource.
my understanding is that each liter of urine has approximately 10ml of N, and that bacteria consumes approximately 5:1 C:N, so I either mix 50ml of humates with every liter of urine, and that’s spread onto the garden / forest garden (diluted).
Or the urine goes into the dry paper and co. biochar to soak for a few days, then the liquid (black urine) is watered into the garden, and the saturated biochar is forked into the garden soil.

i should run some simple field tests.
[RWL:  Looks like you are doing everything right.  I look forward to hearing what happens as you compare different amounts vs a control. 

as well, I read somewhere about a characterisation project? Aiming to link feedstock, pyrolysis method and resulted biochar?
I had not managed to find the database, is this in existence? Common knowledge to this list? How would one get access to the information?
[RWL:   There is a H-P Schmidt paper on this I’ll try to find.  Also compares good (seasoned) and bad (raw) char.

And has anyone seen some info on the structural characteristics of paper/cardboard biochar?
[RWL:  I’ll try to look tomorrow   I don’t recall any.


hope I clarified a few points.. :-)
[RWL:  Yup.   You’re really on to something new I think.  New and likely important.

Re the BLDD idea - I will try to send more - but the basic idea is to use your existing 200 liter barrel exactly as is - but light at the bottom.  Open (cold top).  The needed downdraft supplied by the existing tall (small diameter) chimney a few feet away.  Flames to travel horizontally those few feet in a trench in the ground - covered by a piece of steel (on which you could cook/boil something (sort of like a Plancha).  I’m claiming not much new equipment needed except the flat horizontal steel plate.

The probable main new problem is getting a fire stated at the base.  Second need is for a way to regulate the needed secondary air.

A proposed advantage over TLUD operation is early being able to start with small height of fuel (better draft) and keep adding fuel until the barrel is totally full rather than half(?) full.

I don’t know of this ever being tried.  For most of us a major difficulty - but you have most of the gear already.

Again - thanks for doing what you are doing.  

Ron. (Not Rob)


happy celebrations
which ever you carry


Re: #biomass #climate #climate #biomass

Tom Miles
 

Rob,

 

I am sure there are recent life cycle cost assessments of small scale biomass power plants since they are required for most public projects. The challenge with most small scale power plants is that the cost of the equipment and labor often outweigh fuel savings from renewable fuels.

 

If I recall there is a small turbine at the VA hospital in White River Junction. Small backpressure turbines require large heat demand. An example of small power generation with large heat demand is a small 500 kWe turbine at a sawmill right there across the river in New Hampshire which heats a very large number of wood dry kilns. I think it was installed in about 2000. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems are often suggested but they also have very large low quality waste heat effluent that must be justified economically. They are best applied is you already have a hot oil boiler with excess heat capacity.

 

We looked at a small, 500 kWe, gasifier with an internal combustion engine recently but the low cost of heat and power did not make it feasible, even with biochar as a co-product.  

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 6:23 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] #biomass #climate

 

Thank you, Tom, for your informative reply. 

I am involved in a project with a VT campus, where a new power plant needs to be installed to replace an old one being decommissioned. I have presented a woodchip plant and they liked it. The issue needs to be decided by the State Building & Grounds department, who operate under a State Law that says: 

"life-cycle costs" shall mean the present value purchase price of an item, plus the replacement cost, plus or minus the salvage value, plus the present value of operation and maintenance costs, plus the energy and environmental externalities' costs or benefits. Where reliable data enables the Department of Buildings and General Services to establish these additional environmental externalities' costs or benefits with respect to a particular purchasing decision or category of purchasing decisions, that is energy related, the Department may recommend the addition or subtraction of an additional price factor. All State agencies shall consider the price factor and environmental considerations set by the Department when examining life-cycle costs for purchasing decisions."

Are there examples of Life Cycle Assessments available for review, so that I can prepare to present this to Buildings & Grounds?  If I can prove that a modern biomass plant has a competitive result, it may open the doors to other state facilities.


Happy new year to you all. 


Re: #biomass #climate #climate #biomass

Robert Lehmert
 

Thank you, Tom, for your informative reply. 

I am involved in a project with a VT campus, where a new power plant needs to be installed to replace an old one being decommissioned. I have presented a woodchip plant and they liked it. The issue needs to be decided by the State Building & Grounds department, who operate under a State Law that says: 

"life-cycle costs" shall mean the present value purchase price of an item, plus the replacement cost, plus or minus the salvage value, plus the present value of operation and maintenance costs, plus the energy and environmental externalities' costs or benefits. Where reliable data enables the Department of Buildings and General Services to establish these additional environmental externalities' costs or benefits with respect to a particular purchasing decision or category of purchasing decisions, that is energy related, the Department may recommend the addition or subtraction of an additional price factor. All State agencies shall consider the price factor and environmental considerations set by the Department when examining life-cycle costs for purchasing decisions."

Are there examples of Life Cycle Assessments available for review, so that I can prepare to present this to Buildings & Grounds?  If I can prove that a modern biomass plant has a competitive result, it may open the doors to other state facilities.


Happy new year to you all. 



Re: #biomass #climate #climate #biomass

Robert Lehmert
 

Thank you Tomasso.

My 7 years of Latin makes me remember the connection between "incineration" and the Latin root for "ash" which is why I suggested it.


Re: [Stoves] [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS #stoves #ethos

Tom Miles
 

Paul

 

The Yahoo list is no longer active.


Tom

 

From: Stoves <stoves-bounces@...> On Behalf Of Anderson, Paul
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 7:57 PM
To: tluds@Biochar.groups.io; biochar@...; 'Discussion of biomass cooking stoves' <stoves@...>
Cc: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Stoves] [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

Tom,   I think that you and I are sending messages to the OLD biochar email address.   This could be a common mistake by others, also.   Do we need to delete the old address from our address books to prevent such errors?

 

Paul   

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: tluds@Biochar.groups.io <tluds@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 9:40 PM
To: biochar@...; 'Discussion of biomass cooking stoves' <stoves@...>; 'tluds@biochar. groups. io' <tluds@biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

I think the biochar Friday is a good idea. Maybe we need to get the word out to a broader list.

 

Tom

 

From: biochar@... <biochar@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 3:24 PM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>; tluds@biochar. groups. io <tluds@biochar.groups.io>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

 

To all,

 

Last Saturday 21 Dec, I sent the message below to  three listservs.   I am  resending it because I have received not one single response about the proposal for Biochar Friday on 24 January 2020 in the Seattle/Kirkland area.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Anderson, Paul
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 11:14 AM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>; tluds@biochar. groups. io <tluds@biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

Biochar Friday 2020    (The attachment is exactly like the message below, but is in  .docx   format.)

 

Dear all      (but directed to those who deal with Biochar issues and/or who could be attending the ETHOS meeting in Kirkland, Washington on 24 – 26 January 2020),

 

Within the regular attendees of ETHOS there is a “mini-sub-group” with an interest in biochar, especially the production of biochar such as with TLUD cookstoves and barrels and other small pyrolysis devices.  Because we are together each year, it is proposed that we have a separate (but coordinated) meeting about biochar on the Friday (24 January this year) before ETHOS starts. 

 

After some few comments from others via email, I have made the following arrangements for the Biochar Friday group:

 

1.  The Biochar Friday group is to have its first gathering on 24 January 2020. 

 

2.  The meeting room of the Kirkland Inn (connected to the breakfast room) has been reserved for the morning of 24 January.   ETHOS controls that meeting room from noon onward.   (There is no option to meet at Shari’s restaurant.)

 

3.  We will gather at 8:00 AM, with an on-time official start at 9:00 AM.   Tom Miles has offered to provide a summary of the status of international (and USA/North America) biochar activities (not just about the organizations called “Biochar Initiatives.”)   How much time he has will be determined after others have had a chance to make proposals for the use of the time.   One additional topic could be the role of PyCC (Pyrolytic Carbon Capture) to assist the battle against climate change.   Perhaps there will be some panel discussions, depending on who attends.   It will NOT be with academic presentations.   The focus is NOT on the agricultural / soil / micro-fauna / etc. aspects of biochar, but such can be mentioned. 

 

4.  We will ask ETHOS leadership if we can extend our time past noon, up to the time when ETHOS will have its use of the room (usually starting at 1:00 or 1:30 PM).  

 

5.  Because the Woodgas TLUD stoves are makers of charcoal / biochar, they could be featured in the afternoon time reserved for ETHOS, but that is up for discussion.  

 

6.  Upon expiration of any time for Biochar topics in the room, the Biochar Friday group is at liberty to move to another location (not defined).  If the group is small, that will be easy.   If numerous, we can be creative with specialty groups or focus groups. 

 

***************

So, the Biochar Friday event is now official.  It is open to everyone.  You can make your travel arrangements to allow your presence at the event.  Remember to register for the ETHOS meeting (at   www.ethoscon.com    , and to reserve your room at the Baymont Inn at Seattle/Kirkland:   425-947-1030  (and say that you are with ETHOS.)

 

There is no charge for Biochar Friday but donations to cover the room rental (AM only) will be accepted at the event (unless we find a sponsor).  

 

This announcement is going to three (3) Listservs but could be forward to others by you:  Biochar group, Stoves Listserv, tluds Listserv.    And ETHOS could send it to its mailing list.   Please reply to your respective listservs, but know that not everyone will see your replies.   Especially if you expect to attend the Biochar Friday, be sure that I receive notification  (  psanders@...  ).  

 

I (we) are looking for some volunteers, but not sure what duties there are to be undertaken.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

__._,_.___


Posted by: "Anderson, Paul" <psanders@...>


Reply via web post

Reply to sender

Reply to group

Start a New Topic

Messages in this topic (2)

 

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__,_._,___


Re: Waste cardboard, paper, newspaper, as feedstock #feedstock

Shaked From
 

Hi Rob,
thanks for the questions, I’ll try to answer best I can.
I’m also just about to run another burn as material is piling up, I’ll be able to share more pictures, what is the best way to do that?
I’m sharing land with an organic market gardener, and waste cardboard seem to be an abundant resource.

in terms of your questions:
1. The picture with the bones at the bottom was aimed at showing the bottom of the kiln, I don’t tend to place the bones at the bottom as it’s the place receiving least heat, and bones do not seem to char well there.

2. I usually start with a bottom layer of sticks, to make sure that the flatness of paper does not block any air intake, the sticks allow even distribution of air. The picture showing the sticks also shows the next layer up of rolled cardboard, starting the stacking from the outside and not yet complete in the center, the sticks are only at the bottom layer.

3. Stacking the rolls of cardboard, paper, newspaper works well, and does not seem to matter upright or horizontal.

4. Nut shells or tree bark when available work well as a complete layer.

5. Bones, egg shells, fruit stones, avocado skins and other such material seem to char best scattered evenly through the paper/ cardboard mass in the top part of the drum.

6. In terms of the design of the kiln, I have seen ‘aqueous solutions’ using both of the approaches, the 2nd drum as a chimney or a third of a drum attached to a flue as a chimney, I chose the later as I had the flue and it seemed lighter and easier to remove at the end of the burn.
i followed their design exactly, and I am very happy with it, I have used TLUDs before, and this one is the cleanest burn homemade TLUD I have constructed and used.

7. Regarding the question about my satisfaction with the resulted char... I’m not sure, which is why I shared this material to start with.
its all charred right through, including the bones, has no smell or taste, washes off easily with a bit of water, soaks up liquid well, and powders without effort, but I had not managed to find any information on the structural characteristics of paper/cardboard char, and I had not run any field trials.

i have been using that char in 2 main ways:
1. Mixed with grass clippings or wood shavings in our composting toilets, so every time someone does their thing they add a handful of the mix into the chamber, once full it sits for six months to decompose, red worms are abundant in the chamber too, after six months the compost is used in the garden or as part of seed raising mix.

2. Our family lives from the farm animals and our garden, and urine is an important resource.
my understanding is that each liter of urine has approximately 10ml of N, and that bacteria consumes approximately 5:1 C:N, so I either mix 50ml of humates with every liter of urine, and that’s spread onto the garden / forest garden (diluted).
Or the urine goes into the dry paper and co. biochar to soak for a few days, then the liquid (black urine) is watered into the garden, and the saturated biochar is forked into the garden soil.

i should run some simple field tests.

as well, I read somewhere about a characterisation project? Aiming to link feedstock, pyrolysis method and resulted biochar?
I had not managed to find the database, is this in existence? Common knowledge to this list? How would one get access to the information? And has anyone seen some info on the structural characteristics of paper/cardboard biochar?

hope I clarified a few points.. :-)

happy celebrations
which ever you carry


Re: [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS #conference #tlud

Tom Miles
 

It’s germane to the Clean Cookstove groups including ETHOS. 

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

On Dec 26, 2019, at 7:54 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:



Tom,   I think that you and I are sending messages to the OLD biochar email address.   This could be a common mistake by others, also.   Do we need to delete the old address from our address books to prevent such errors?

 

Paul   

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: tluds@Biochar.groups.io <tluds@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 9:40 PM
To: biochar@...; 'Discussion of biomass cooking stoves' <stoves@...>; 'tluds@biochar. groups. io' <tluds@biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

I think the biochar Friday is a good idea. Maybe we need to get the word out to a broader list.

 

Tom

 

From: biochar@... <biochar@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 3:24 PM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>; tluds@biochar. groups. io <tluds@biochar.groups.io>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

 

To all,

 

Last Saturday 21 Dec, I sent the message below to  three listservs.   I am  resending it because I have received not one single response about the proposal for Biochar Friday on 24 January 2020 in the Seattle/Kirkland area.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Anderson, Paul
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 11:14 AM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>; tluds@biochar. groups. io <tluds@biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

Biochar Friday 2020    (The attachment is exactly like the message below, but is in  .docx   format.)

 

Dear all      (but directed to those who deal with Biochar issues and/or who could be attending the ETHOS meeting in Kirkland, Washington on 24 – 26 January 2020),

 

Within the regular attendees of ETHOS there is a “mini-sub-group” with an interest in biochar, especially the production of biochar such as with TLUD cookstoves and barrels and other small pyrolysis devices.  Because we are together each year, it is proposed that we have a separate (but coordinated) meeting about biochar on the Friday (24 January this year) before ETHOS starts. 

 

After some few comments from others via email, I have made the following arrangements for the Biochar Friday group:

 

1.  The Biochar Friday group is to have its first gathering on 24 January 2020. 

 

2.  The meeting room of the Kirkland Inn (connected to the breakfast room) has been reserved for the morning of 24 January.   ETHOS controls that meeting room from noon onward.   (There is no option to meet at Shari’s restaurant.)

 

3.  We will gather at 8:00 AM, with an on-time official start at 9:00 AM.   Tom Miles has offered to provide a summary of the status of international (and USA/North America) biochar activities (not just about the organizations called “Biochar Initiatives.”)   How much time he has will be determined after others have had a chance to make proposals for the use of the time.   One additional topic could be the role of PyCC (Pyrolytic Carbon Capture) to assist the battle against climate change.   Perhaps there will be some panel discussions, depending on who attends.   It will NOT be with academic presentations.   The focus is NOT on the agricultural / soil / micro-fauna / etc. aspects of biochar, but such can be mentioned. 

 

4.  We will ask ETHOS leadership if we can extend our time past noon, up to the time when ETHOS will have its use of the room (usually starting at 1:00 or 1:30 PM).  

 

5.  Because the Woodgas TLUD stoves are makers of charcoal / biochar, they could be featured in the afternoon time reserved for ETHOS, but that is up for discussion.  

 

6.  Upon expiration of any time for Biochar topics in the room, the Biochar Friday group is at liberty to move to another location (not defined).  If the group is small, that will be easy.   If numerous, we can be creative with specialty groups or focus groups. 

 

***************

So, the Biochar Friday event is now official.  It is open to everyone.  You can make your travel arrangements to allow your presence at the event.  Remember to register for the ETHOS meeting (at   www.ethoscon.com    , and to reserve your room at the Baymont Inn at Seattle/Kirkland:   425-947-1030  (and say that you are with ETHOS.)

 

There is no charge for Biochar Friday but donations to cover the room rental (AM only) will be accepted at the event (unless we find a sponsor).  

 

This announcement is going to three (3) Listservs but could be forward to others by you:  Biochar group, Stoves Listserv, tluds Listserv.    And ETHOS could send it to its mailing list.   Please reply to your respective listservs, but know that not everyone will see your replies.   Especially if you expect to attend the Biochar Friday, be sure that I receive notification  (  psanders@...  ).  

 

I (we) are looking for some volunteers, but not sure what duties there are to be undertaken.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

__._,_.___


Posted by: "Anderson, Paul" <psanders@...>


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Re: [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS #conference #tlud

Paul S Anderson
 

Tom,   I think that you and I are sending messages to the OLD biochar email address.   This could be a common mistake by others, also.   Do we need to delete the old address from our address books to prevent such errors?

 

Paul   

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: tluds@Biochar.groups.io <tluds@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 9:40 PM
To: biochar@...; 'Discussion of biomass cooking stoves' <stoves@...>; 'tluds@biochar. groups. io' <tluds@biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: [tluds] [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

I think the biochar Friday is a good idea. Maybe we need to get the word out to a broader list.

 

Tom

 

From: biochar@... <biochar@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 3:24 PM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>; tluds@biochar. groups. io <tluds@biochar.groups.io>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [biochar] FW: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

 

To all,

 

Last Saturday 21 Dec, I sent the message below to  three listservs.   I am  resending it because I have received not one single response about the proposal for Biochar Friday on 24 January 2020 in the Seattle/Kirkland area.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Anderson, Paul
Sent: Saturday, December 21, 2019 11:14 AM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>; tluds@biochar. groups. io <tluds@biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Biochar Friday at the start of ETHOS

 

Biochar Friday 2020    (The attachment is exactly like the message below, but is in  .docx   format.)

 

Dear all      (but directed to those who deal with Biochar issues and/or who could be attending the ETHOS meeting in Kirkland, Washington on 24 – 26 January 2020),

 

Within the regular attendees of ETHOS there is a “mini-sub-group” with an interest in biochar, especially the production of biochar such as with TLUD cookstoves and barrels and other small pyrolysis devices.  Because we are together each year, it is proposed that we have a separate (but coordinated) meeting about biochar on the Friday (24 January this year) before ETHOS starts. 

 

After some few comments from others via email, I have made the following arrangements for the Biochar Friday group:

 

1.  The Biochar Friday group is to have its first gathering on 24 January 2020. 

 

2.  The meeting room of the Kirkland Inn (connected to the breakfast room) has been reserved for the morning of 24 January.   ETHOS controls that meeting room from noon onward.   (There is no option to meet at Shari’s restaurant.)

 

3.  We will gather at 8:00 AM, with an on-time official start at 9:00 AM.   Tom Miles has offered to provide a summary of the status of international (and USA/North America) biochar activities (not just about the organizations called “Biochar Initiatives.”)   How much time he has will be determined after others have had a chance to make proposals for the use of the time.   One additional topic could be the role of PyCC (Pyrolytic Carbon Capture) to assist the battle against climate change.   Perhaps there will be some panel discussions, depending on who attends.   It will NOT be with academic presentations.   The focus is NOT on the agricultural / soil / micro-fauna / etc. aspects of biochar, but such can be mentioned. 

 

4.  We will ask ETHOS leadership if we can extend our time past noon, up to the time when ETHOS will have its use of the room (usually starting at 1:00 or 1:30 PM).  

 

5.  Because the Woodgas TLUD stoves are makers of charcoal / biochar, they could be featured in the afternoon time reserved for ETHOS, but that is up for discussion.  

 

6.  Upon expiration of any time for Biochar topics in the room, the Biochar Friday group is at liberty to move to another location (not defined).  If the group is small, that will be easy.   If numerous, we can be creative with specialty groups or focus groups. 

 

***************

So, the Biochar Friday event is now official.  It is open to everyone.  You can make your travel arrangements to allow your presence at the event.  Remember to register for the ETHOS meeting (at   www.ethoscon.com    , and to reserve your room at the Baymont Inn at Seattle/Kirkland:   425-947-1030  (and say that you are with ETHOS.)

 

There is no charge for Biochar Friday but donations to cover the room rental (AM only) will be accepted at the event (unless we find a sponsor).  

 

This announcement is going to three (3) Listservs but could be forward to others by you:  Biochar group, Stoves Listserv, tluds Listserv.    And ETHOS could send it to its mailing list.   Please reply to your respective listservs, but know that not everyone will see your replies.   Especially if you expect to attend the Biochar Friday, be sure that I receive notification  (  psanders@...  ).  

 

I (we) are looking for some volunteers, but not sure what duties there are to be undertaken.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

__._,_.___


Posted by: "Anderson, Paul" <psanders@...>


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Re: Waste cardboard, paper, newspaper, as feedstock #feedstock

Ron Larson
 

Shaked From:   cc list

You have raised some interesting new TLUD  issues with the four photos given in your message below.

Your “here” in the text refers back to Josh Kearns who has done much of the best work with improving water quality through “Aqueous Solutions”.  You have found it better apparently to not use the upper 200 liter “chimney”.  Any comments on time and material savings for your single barrel approach?

I don’t recall anyone reporting an input biomass assortment like you show.

This was your first photo - which was quite surprising to me in terms of having pieces running both vertically and horizontally.  Ever have any problems with getting an unintentional path from top to bottom through one of the rolls?   (Having a flat pyrolysis front?)

Are you satisfied with the quality of the char made from cardboard and (I presume) sometimes paper?


I don’t need to show the second photo, which had twigs in the center of a ring of rolled up cardboard - but here looking much more uniform..  Same questions on running OK always?
 


In this third photo, are the whitish pieces bones that you threw in before starting the next run?
The intent was mainly to to show the size and spring of the air holes?
Do the bones come out quite black?  Brittle enough to break apart??




Thanks for sharing this new (to me) loading approach.

I’m envious of the scene in the fourth photo.

To the rest of the biochar list - anyone else?

Ron



On Dec 20, 2019, at 1:05 AM, Shaked From <shakedfrom@...> wrote:

Thank you for the information and references.

just as a side track, my method of charing the materials described has been as in the pictures below:
The kiln I have used is based on the design found here which showed a very clean burn with hardly any visible smoke, very good draw and perfectly charred material.
(I hope this method of placing the pictures in the text box is going to work)
<A77FCBD5-7436-4CFE-AD7B-965FF91DB2B1.jpeg><44E372F0-1DA5-4F75-8628-F59B5D2AF70C.jpeg><5285E853-8ED5-442F-BA6C-24B8B9975059.jpeg><43CE22A9-F9AA-4297-8171-F8466CF92536.jpeg>


Re: A Subtle Attack on Biochar for Carbon Sequestration #wildfire #carbon

Don Coyne <don@...>
 

Thanks Robert, Chars! 😉

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ROBERT W GILLETT
Sent: Thursday, 26 December 2019 8:09 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Subtle Attack on Biochar for Carbon Sequestration #carbon #wildfire

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Don,

This recent germane article, which concludes that black carbon in the ocean did not originate mostly on land, has a link to a 2017 paper that may be the one Albert referred to. 

Robert


Re: A Subtle Attack on Biochar for Carbon Sequestration #wildfire #carbon

ROBERT W GILLETT
 
Edited

Don,

This recent germane article, which concludes that black carbon in the ocean did not originate mostly on land, has a link to a 2017 paper that may be the one Albert referred to. 

Robert


Re: Biochar in Soil #biochar #soil #organic matter #organic #biochar #soil

Tom Miles
 

Thanks for highlighting this Bob. The carbon foam project has been underway for a few years. It’s good to see some progress.

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ROBERT W GILLETT
Sent: Wednesday, December 25, 2019 4:59 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Carbon foam #catalysts

 

Merry Christmas All,

Thought I'd drop a lump of hi-tech coal in your stockings. Carbon foam looks like a high-quality biochar from the description by the USFS. The recent winners of the Keeling Curve prize may be using it as a substrate to form catalysts for CO2 capture (see paper by Ma et al. under References). Biochar may yet end up being the biggest solution to global warming, but under a different moniker and in a way most did not anticipate.

Robert Gillett


Re: A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

Frank Strie
 

Yes Don, good links thanks for sharing and pointing every interested reader to such valuable inormation.

Just finished reading this opinion article today and listened to the TEDx talk about the wisdom from the Amazon. (see link below).

There’s another story to tell about climate change. And it starts with water  Judith D Schwartz

For me, as a restoration forester applying methodologies based on ProSilva Forest Management principles the combination of the various forms of carbons with the water, nutrient and light cycles enables us to regenerate sources of shelter, eventually forming moisture and growing cool microclimates. …We do this here in Tasmania and eventually we will be able to get our collaboration with other initiatives like the blue economy. …

The final sentences of the article:
…”Here’s another climate subplot worth mulling overWalter Jehne points out that based on data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, every square metre of Earth’s surface receives an average of 342 watts of solar energy a day. Because of how humans have altered the environment, we now radiate back about 339 watts per square metre – a difference of less than 1%. If we managed our ecology better, how might we make up that three-watt differential? How about if we had a lot more plant cover and a lot less bare ground?

One challenge to reckoning with climate change is that despite all the weather anomalies we’ve been seeing, it’s difficult to confidently link climate change to any one event. This perpetuates the notion that climate change is an abstraction to be pushed off into the future, and leads to cognitive dissonance in that it seems impossible to “prove” what we know to be so. Let me now introduce an alternate definition of climate change: “manifestations of distorted carbon, water and energy cycles”. That doesn’t negate the single story of fossil fuel-borne carbon but broadens it in a way that creates opportunities beyond fighting fossil fuel interests. At this moment of reckless distraction and denial, it is crucial to find meaningful paths forward.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/03/climate-change-water-fossil-fuel?fbclid=IwAR0nK-jjUpOzcGu1IHNrCKHq4dC9DlHWrsuZZMkReOiBIWKP5CN2Vz1n-Ic

It is the combination of the things we know we can do that is the way that works.
May 2020 bring together ever more Change Agents with combined skills and understanding.
The US Composting Association will get a good discussion happening in only a few weeks from now.
The ripple effect may be seen Down Under before too long.
Cheers to you all
Frank again

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 9:37 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

 

I agree Frank, ever since I read Hans Peter Schmidt 55 Uses of Biochar back in 2013 I have been intrigued by the concept of building things with biochar including soil. https://www.biochar-journal.org/en/ct/2 It will all end up in there anyway. We advocated again for this at ANZBC19 with a number of presentations on biochar in hot & cold mix asphalt as well biochar concrete including 3D Printed Concrete Automated construction. You can download 70% of the presentations from ANZBC19 here https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1MEkykMe3TlFFYAUkgHD3naDhVxoMJfw8

 

Chars,

 

Don

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Frank Strie
Sent: Thursday, 26 December 2019 9:23 AM
To:
main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

 

Considering the seriousness, urgency to be effective, the massive scale, reasons etc., I like to strongly suggest anyone read or listen to the book being read for us,  ‘Carbon Cascades’  - ‘Using Fire to Cool the Earth’ by Albert Bates & Kathleen Draper
The very topics of what is, may and is not effective and why … this  is being explored, reasoned and explained to anyone care to read it with and open mind.
Share what you learned and understand and let’s get into, let’s continue and let’s make the best of PyCCS.

Burn: Using Fire to Cool the Earth (Audible ... - Amazon.com

https://www.amazon.com › Burn-Using-Fire-Cool-Earth

 

Amazon.com: BurnUsing Fire to Cool the Earth (Audible Audio Edition): Albert Bates, Kathleen Draper, Tia Rider, Chelsea Green Publishing Company: Audible ...


Best wishes
Frank

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 1:36 AM
To:
main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

 

To be perfectly honest, my immediate reaction to the language here is that this was written by an oil or coal or power industry lobbyist to generate a subsidy for a costly, overhyped and technically probably marginal way to "dispose" of CO2. Yes, it is possible to grab CO2 at the stack, compress it to liquid and pump it into old wells. The language here effectively defines that and that alone as an/the acceptable technology. This is BS. (1) No one knows whether the stuff will stay down there or not. (It is pretty hot down there, after all, and liquid CO2 expands quite forcefully when heated. (2) Liquid CO2 is very slippery and no one knows what the geological consequences of pumping millions of gallons into oil shale will be - perhaps we can have geostability or sequestered carbon, but not both. (3) Just what is the logic of defining as the only acceptable tech a costly, industry specific one that excludes, apparently deliberately, low cost, low tech solutions the results of which have known benefits (e.g., water retention and decontamination, soil restoration, the locking up of heavy metals and so on)?

 

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019, 2:16 AM Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hello -- I'm forwarding to the legislative outreach person at the off of my Representative, Peter Welch, for possible cosponsoring. Vermont is, as a state, cooking up a homegrown "Payment for Ecosystems Services" program, and I'm also forwarding to my state because this Bill better reflects concepts like additinality, and also gives a tax credit for analysis of soils, which can be costly.

Regarding 45Q -- I disagree that it specifically excludes biochar and would argue that it includes it. 45Q requires that carbon be "disposed of by the taxpayer in secure geological storage " I think if you put BC in soils or in a road, it is sequestered as safely as injecting it into a mine. I think the rest of the language supports BC and 45Q.  

[entire 45Q text is here: https://tinyurl.com/u7ahkao ]

I am not a tax expert, and I'd appreciate any more critical opinions on the issue. What puts me off about 45Q is the high minimum amounts needed. The code says:

(d) Qualified facility

For purposes of this section, the term "qualified facility" means any industrial facility or direct air capture facility-

(1) the construction of which begins before January 1, 2024, and-

(A) construction of carbon capture equipment begins before such date, or

(B) the original planning and design for such facility includes installation of carbon capture equipment, and

 

(2) which captures-

(A) in the case of a facility which emits not more than 500,000 metric tons of carbon oxide into the atmosphere during the taxable year, not less than 25,000 metric tons of qualified carbon oxide during the taxable year which is utilized in a manner described in subsection (f)(5),


25,000 metric tonnes is a lot of CO2e. Some companies will make 9,000 metric tonnes of Biochar, but not many.  I would like that reduced in contemplation of smaller facilities and changed to to allow aggregation of several facilities under the same beneficial control.

Thanks for raising the issue. This credit is HUGE if we can get it.
Rob






On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 09:37 AM, Ron Larson wrote:

The following just came to my attention:

 

 

 which then sends us to:

 

 

 

I think biochar fits, but it may have been designed only around no-till.  It is based in part on the 45Q carbon credit legislation for CDR already in place (that intentionally leaves biochar out).

 

I read this to say that folks on this list could help establish the rules and maybe also help certify.  There’s a tax transferrable aspect.

 

I’ve read the 11 pages twice, but don’t have enough tax expertise to know what might be missing.   There isn’t anything specifically on out-year advantages.  Nothing on energy.  The words “wildfire mitigation” are not there.

 

I see no indication on the timing for introduction by Bennett - but his act probably will have to be introduced within a month or two.  Announced 4 days ago.  No co-sponsors.  Nothing about a House sponsor.

 

Thoughts?   Bennett is my Senator,  I’d like to visit his office and make sure that the biochar community is seen as an ally.  He definitely is looking for input from groups like this list

 

Ron

  


Re: A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

Don Coyne <don@...>
 

I agree Frank, ever since I read Hans Peter Schmidt 55 Uses of Biochar back in 2013 I have been intrigued by the concept of building things with biochar including soil. https://www.biochar-journal.org/en/ct/2 It will all end up in there anyway. We advocated again for this at ANZBC19 with a number of presentations on biochar in hot & cold mix asphalt as well biochar concrete including 3D Printed Concrete Automated construction. You can download 70% of the presentations from ANZBC19 here https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1MEkykMe3TlFFYAUkgHD3naDhVxoMJfw8

 

Chars,

 

Don

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Frank Strie
Sent: Thursday, 26 December 2019 9:23 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

 

Considering the seriousness, urgency to be effective, the massive scale, reasons etc., I like to strongly suggest anyone read or listen to the book being read for us,  ‘Carbon Cascades’  - ‘Using Fire to Cool the Earth’ by Albert Bates & Kathleen Draper
The very topics of what is, may and is not effective and why … this  is being explored, reasoned and explained to anyone care to read it with and open mind.
Share what you learned and understand and let’s get into, let’s continue and let’s make the best of PyCCS.

Burn: Using Fire to Cool the Earth (Audible ... - Amazon.com

https://www.amazon.com › Burn-Using-Fire-Cool-Earth

 

Amazon.com: BurnUsing Fire to Cool the Earth (Audible Audio Edition): Albert Bates, Kathleen Draper, Tia Rider, Chelsea Green Publishing Company: Audible ...


Best wishes
Frank

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 1:36 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

 

To be perfectly honest, my immediate reaction to the language here is that this was written by an oil or coal or power industry lobbyist to generate a subsidy for a costly, overhyped and technically probably marginal way to "dispose" of CO2. Yes, it is possible to grab CO2 at the stack, compress it to liquid and pump it into old wells. The language here effectively defines that and that alone as an/the acceptable technology. This is BS. (1) No one knows whether the stuff will stay down there or not. (It is pretty hot down there, after all, and liquid CO2 expands quite forcefully when heated. (2) Liquid CO2 is very slippery and no one knows what the geological consequences of pumping millions of gallons into oil shale will be - perhaps we can have geostability or sequestered carbon, but not both. (3) Just what is the logic of defining as the only acceptable tech a costly, industry specific one that excludes, apparently deliberately, low cost, low tech solutions the results of which have known benefits (e.g., water retention and decontamination, soil restoration, the locking up of heavy metals and so on)?

 

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019, 2:16 AM Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hello -- I'm forwarding to the legislative outreach person at the off of my Representative, Peter Welch, for possible cosponsoring. Vermont is, as a state, cooking up a homegrown "Payment for Ecosystems Services" program, and I'm also forwarding to my state because this Bill better reflects concepts like additinality, and also gives a tax credit for analysis of soils, which can be costly.

Regarding 45Q -- I disagree that it specifically excludes biochar and would argue that it includes it. 45Q requires that carbon be "disposed of by the taxpayer in secure geological storage " I think if you put BC in soils or in a road, it is sequestered as safely as injecting it into a mine. I think the rest of the language supports BC and 45Q.  

[entire 45Q text is here: https://tinyurl.com/u7ahkao ]

I am not a tax expert, and I'd appreciate any more critical opinions on the issue. What puts me off about 45Q is the high minimum amounts needed. The code says:

(d) Qualified facility

For purposes of this section, the term "qualified facility" means any industrial facility or direct air capture facility-

(1) the construction of which begins before January 1, 2024, and-

(A) construction of carbon capture equipment begins before such date, or

(B) the original planning and design for such facility includes installation of carbon capture equipment, and

 

(2) which captures-

(A) in the case of a facility which emits not more than 500,000 metric tons of carbon oxide into the atmosphere during the taxable year, not less than 25,000 metric tons of qualified carbon oxide during the taxable year which is utilized in a manner described in subsection (f)(5),


25,000 metric tonnes is a lot of CO2e. Some companies will make 9,000 metric tonnes of Biochar, but not many.  I would like that reduced in contemplation of smaller facilities and changed to to allow aggregation of several facilities under the same beneficial control.

Thanks for raising the issue. This credit is HUGE if we can get it.
Rob






On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 09:37 AM, Ron Larson wrote:

The following just came to my attention:

 

 

 which then sends us to:

 

 

 

I think biochar fits, but it may have been designed only around no-till.  It is based in part on the 45Q carbon credit legislation for CDR already in place (that intentionally leaves biochar out).

 

I read this to say that folks on this list could help establish the rules and maybe also help certify.  There’s a tax transferrable aspect.

 

I’ve read the 11 pages twice, but don’t have enough tax expertise to know what might be missing.   There isn’t anything specifically on out-year advantages.  Nothing on energy.  The words “wildfire mitigation” are not there.

 

I see no indication on the timing for introduction by Bennett - but his act probably will have to be introduced within a month or two.  Announced 4 days ago.  No co-sponsors.  Nothing about a House sponsor.

 

Thoughts?   Bennett is my Senator,  I’d like to visit his office and make sure that the biochar community is seen as an ally.  He definitely is looking for input from groups like this list

 

Ron

  


Re: A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

Frank Strie
 

Considering the seriousness, urgency to be effective, the massive scale, reasons etc., I like to strongly suggest anyone read or listen to the book being read for us,  ‘Carbon Cascades’  - ‘Using Fire to Cool the Earth’ by Albert Bates & Kathleen Draper
The very topics of what is, may and is not effective and why … this  is being explored, reasoned and explained to anyone care to read it with and open mind.
Share what you learned and understand and let’s get into, let’s continue and let’s make the best of PyCCS.

Burn: Using Fire to Cool the Earth (Audible ... - Amazon.com

 

https://www.amazon.com › Burn-Using-Fire-Cool-Earth

 

Amazon.com: BurnUsing Fire to Cool the Earth (Audible Audio Edition): Albert Bates, Kathleen Draper, Tia Rider, Chelsea Green Publishing Company: Audible ...


Best wishes
Frank

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 1:36 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

 

To be perfectly honest, my immediate reaction to the language here is that this was written by an oil or coal or power industry lobbyist to generate a subsidy for a costly, overhyped and technically probably marginal way to "dispose" of CO2. Yes, it is possible to grab CO2 at the stack, compress it to liquid and pump it into old wells. The language here effectively defines that and that alone as an/the acceptable technology. This is BS. (1) No one knows whether the stuff will stay down there or not. (It is pretty hot down there, after all, and liquid CO2 expands quite forcefully when heated. (2) Liquid CO2 is very slippery and no one knows what the geological consequences of pumping millions of gallons into oil shale will be - perhaps we can have geostability or sequestered carbon, but not both. (3) Just what is the logic of defining as the only acceptable tech a costly, industry specific one that excludes, apparently deliberately, low cost, low tech solutions the results of which have known benefits (e.g., water retention and decontamination, soil restoration, the locking up of heavy metals and so on)?

 

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019, 2:16 AM Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hello -- I'm forwarding to the legislative outreach person at the off of my Representative, Peter Welch, for possible cosponsoring. Vermont is, as a state, cooking up a homegrown "Payment for Ecosystems Services" program, and I'm also forwarding to my state because this Bill better reflects concepts like additinality, and also gives a tax credit for analysis of soils, which can be costly.

Regarding 45Q -- I disagree that it specifically excludes biochar and would argue that it includes it. 45Q requires that carbon be "disposed of by the taxpayer in secure geological storage " I think if you put BC in soils or in a road, it is sequestered as safely as injecting it into a mine. I think the rest of the language supports BC and 45Q.  

[entire 45Q text is here: https://tinyurl.com/u7ahkao ]

I am not a tax expert, and I'd appreciate any more critical opinions on the issue. What puts me off about 45Q is the high minimum amounts needed. The code says:


(d) Qualified facility

For purposes of this section, the term "qualified facility" means any industrial facility or direct air capture facility-

(1) the construction of which begins before January 1, 2024, and-

(A) construction of carbon capture equipment begins before such date, or

(B) the original planning and design for such facility includes installation of carbon capture equipment, and

 

(2) which captures-

(A) in the case of a facility which emits not more than 500,000 metric tons of carbon oxide into the atmosphere during the taxable year, not less than 25,000 metric tons of qualified carbon oxide during the taxable year which is utilized in a manner described in subsection (f)(5),


25,000 metric tonnes is a lot of CO2e. Some companies will make 9,000 metric tonnes of Biochar, but not many.  I would like that reduced in contemplation of smaller facilities and changed to to allow aggregation of several facilities under the same beneficial control.

Thanks for raising the issue. This credit is HUGE if we can get it.
Rob






On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 09:37 AM, Ron Larson wrote:

The following just came to my attention:

 

 

 which then sends us to:

 

 

 

I think biochar fits, but it may have been designed only around no-till.  It is based in part on the 45Q carbon credit legislation for CDR already in place (that intentionally leaves biochar out).

 

I read this to say that folks on this list could help establish the rules and maybe also help certify.  There’s a tax transferrable aspect.

 

I’ve read the 11 pages twice, but don’t have enough tax expertise to know what might be missing.   There isn’t anything specifically on out-year advantages.  Nothing on energy.  The words “wildfire mitigation” are not there.

 

I see no indication on the timing for introduction by Bennett - but his act probably will have to be introduced within a month or two.  Announced 4 days ago.  No co-sponsors.  Nothing about a House sponsor.

 

Thoughts?   Bennett is my Senator,  I’d like to visit his office and make sure that the biochar community is seen as an ally.  He definitely is looking for input from groups like this list

 

Ron

  


Re: A Bill To Help Biochar? #policy

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

To be perfectly honest, my immediate reaction to the language here is that this was written by an oil or coal or power industry lobbyist to generate a subsidy for a costly, overhyped and technically probably marginal way to "dispose" of CO2. Yes, it is possible to grab CO2 at the stack, compress it to liquid and pump it into old wells. The language here effectively defines that and that alone as an/the acceptable technology. This is BS. (1) No one knows whether the stuff will stay down there or not. (It is pretty hot down there, after all, and liquid CO2 expands quite forcefully when heated. (2) Liquid CO2 is very slippery and no one knows what the geological consequences of pumping millions of gallons into oil shale will be - perhaps we can have geostability or sequestered carbon, but not both. (3) Just what is the logic of defining as the only acceptable tech a costly, industry specific one that excludes, apparently deliberately, low cost, low tech solutions the results of which have known benefits (e.g., water retention and decontamination, soil restoration, the locking up of heavy metals and so on)?


On Fri, Dec 20, 2019, 2:16 AM Robert Lehmert via Groups.Io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hello -- I'm forwarding to the legislative outreach person at the off of my Representative, Peter Welch, for possible cosponsoring. Vermont is, as a state, cooking up a homegrown "Payment for Ecosystems Services" program, and I'm also forwarding to my state because this Bill better reflects concepts like additinality, and also gives a tax credit for analysis of soils, which can be costly.

Regarding 45Q -- I disagree that it specifically excludes biochar and would argue that it includes it. 45Q requires that carbon be "disposed of by the taxpayer in secure geological storage " I think if you put BC in soils or in a road, it is sequestered as safely as injecting it into a mine. I think the rest of the language supports BC and 45Q.  

[entire 45Q text is here: https://tinyurl.com/u7ahkao ]

I am not a tax expert, and I'd appreciate any more critical opinions on the issue. What puts me off about 45Q is the high minimum amounts needed. The code says:

(d) Qualified facility

For purposes of this section, the term "qualified facility" means any industrial facility or direct air capture facility-

(1) the construction of which begins before January 1, 2024, and-

(A) construction of carbon capture equipment begins before such date, or

(B) the original planning and design for such facility includes installation of carbon capture equipment, and


(2) which captures-

(A) in the case of a facility which emits not more than 500,000 metric tons of carbon oxide into the atmosphere during the taxable year, not less than 25,000 metric tons of qualified carbon oxide during the taxable year which is utilized in a manner described in subsection (f)(5),


25,000 metric tonnes is a lot of CO2e. Some companies will make 9,000 metric tonnes of Biochar, but not many.  I would like that reduced in contemplation of smaller facilities and changed to to allow aggregation of several facilities under the same beneficial control.

Thanks for raising the issue. This credit is HUGE if we can get it.
Rob






On Tue, Dec 17, 2019 at 09:37 AM, Ron Larson wrote:
The following just came to my attention:
 
 
 which then sends us to:
 
 
 
I think biochar fits, but it may have been designed only around no-till.  It is based in part on the 45Q carbon credit legislation for CDR already in place (that intentionally leaves biochar out).
 
I read this to say that folks on this list could help establish the rules and maybe also help certify.  There’s a tax transferrable aspect.
 
I’ve read the 11 pages twice, but don’t have enough tax expertise to know what might be missing.   There isn’t anything specifically on out-year advantages.  Nothing on energy.  The words “wildfire mitigation” are not there.
 
I see no indication on the timing for introduction by Bennett - but his act probably will have to be introduced within a month or two.  Announced 4 days ago.  No co-sponsors.  Nothing about a House sponsor.
 
Thoughts?   Bennett is my Senator,  I’d like to visit his office and make sure that the biochar community is seen as an ally.  He definitely is looking for input from groups like this list
 
Ron
  


Re: Seeking information #wanted

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Paul, Thanks for hooking them up. So much to do about such a small thing. Five kg is half a TLUD and it's not as if there are not dozens of top labs at work on char in India!


On Thu, Dec 19, 2019, 12:16 PM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Dear Dr. Mukherjee,

 

I invite you to discuss more fully your needs about obtaining suitable biochar.   Production via TLUD stoves (kilns) and the 4C kilns for larger quantities is a major effort that I conduct.   I have just returned from India where I was involved with char (to be used as biochar) production.

 

I and others could assist you to be able to produce at your Institute the needed 4 or 5 kg.   Or you could possibly acquire that amount from my contact at CSIR IMMT.  

 

Do you want to purchase “biochar” that is “raw pure charcoal” or “treated – enhanced charcoal”?    Is it your intention to fly into India some charcoal that has been inoculated or otherwise altered?

 

Interested in assisting you.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of santanu mukherjee via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 9:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Biochar-Policy <biochar-policy@...>; Biochar Group <biochar@...>
Subject: [Biochar] Seeking information

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Dear All,

           Our research group (IIT-Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India) urgently need 4/5 kilos of biochar produced from any feedstock/ any procedures. No temperatures/reaction conditions specified but probably would be best to have less ash content (so 600-800 degree production condition would be best but not restricted) as we want to use it for remediation purposes? Please help me in finding the suppliers and associated costs?

 

Please let me know.

 

Thanking You.

Kind Regards,
Dr. Santanu Mukherjee (Dr. agr., Univ of Bonn)
Former Visiting Scientist at Savannah River Ecology Laboratory | University of Georgia (2016-2017)
Former Guest Scientist at Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Juelich, Germany (2011-2016)


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