Date   

Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

mikethewormguy
 

Paul,

We use a blend of green sand, gypsum, diatomaceous earth, vermicompost, bone char, wheat straw char, wood char, and leaf compost to plant the potato starts......

Mike





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

Kevin Chisholm
 

Hi Paul

 

As I understand it “Potato Scab” is caused by a soil pathogen that only lives in an alkaline soil. If your soil was “significantly acid” then the “liming effect of biochar” could be very beneficial. On the other hand, if your soil was alkaline, the “liming effect of biochar” could cause “Potato Scab”.

 

If your soil pH was close to optimal, you could “soak and drain” the biochar, to remove at least some of the solubles responsible for the liming effect. OR, “soaking and draining” should allow you to add more biochar to the soil, without creating a “Potato Scab” problem.

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
Sent: April 8, 2020 7:51 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Garden problems solved with biochar

 

Dear Mike,

Yes, the trench system is the conventional technique for potato cultivation. Have you ever been use biochar-soil mixture for potato cultivation? I think it will be more effective for potato growth because biochar will decrease the soil integrity and growth will be high.

 

Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher

 

Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.

 

On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 4:25 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Paul,

 

Interesting setup for potatoes.  Looks like a technique that can be used if you want to grow potatoes and do not have any land.

 

We use a trench system to plant the potatoes starts.  We grow a range of different varieties.  We use straw hilling as the plant grows.....

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 


Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Dear Mike,
Yes, the trench system is the conventional technique for potato cultivation. Have you ever been use biochar-soil mixture for potato cultivation? I think it will be more effective for potato growth because biochar will decrease the soil integrity and growth will be high.

Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 4:25 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul,

Interesting setup for potatoes.  Looks like a technique that can be used if you want to grow potatoes and do not have any land.

We use a trench system to plant the potatoes starts.  We grow a range of different varieties.  We use straw hilling as the plant grows.....

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: experiment with biochar #inoculatedbiochar

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Dear Mike,
We are using biochar and a small amount of carbon source (glucose) in biochar media nad evaluating the phosphorus release from biochar media. The "blending of fungi with earthworms" is quite a new idea for us. can you please describe it in detail or any research articles?


Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 11:06 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul,

Are you doing any single species solid state fermentations using nutrient enriched biochar, as a solid substrate, for the fungi to grow onto and sporulate into....?

Have you considered feeding your fungi blend to earthworms to make a targeted worm castings....?

Mike








Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: experiment with biochar #inoculatedbiochar

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Dear Mike,
At the moment we are not using bone-char. We are using sewage sludge biochar only (different pyrolysis temperature). However, we also plan to do that also in the future. If you have any idea regarding the experiment please inform me. 

Thank you for your question. Be careful and stay safe.


Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.



On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 4:09 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul,

Have you done any work using bone char with your fungi.....?

Mike





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: experiment with biochar #inoculatedbiochar

mikethewormguy
 

Paul,

Are you doing any single species solid state fermentations using nutrient enriched biochar, as a solid substrate, for the fungi to grow onto and sporulate into....?

Have you considered feeding your fungi blend to earthworms to make a targeted worm castings....?

Mike








Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: assistance with field experiments #fieldtrials

Claudia Kammann
 

I second Chuck’s advice for composting the manure with woody biochar

 

Motto: „compost the (nutrient-rich) best and pyrolyze the (woody) rest”

 

For producing a good quality biochar you can do it via the Kon-Tiki kiln technique (as long as you don’t have a larger machine). There are a lot of online tutorials and it’s easy to learn. If you can’t built a cheap Kon-Tiki, you can also use a large, cone shaped pit in the ground as long as you use the principle of flame curtain pyrolysis. I’ll send two papers that may help and make the method citable for you.

 

cheers, Claudia

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Charles Hegberg
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 8. April 2020 18:08
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] assistance with field experiments

 

Where are you located?  Short of a commercial gasifier with capabilities to handle manures, not sure about small scale production.  You might be better to produce wood char and compost the poultry litter with the biochar which also makes a great product.  Most manure char production is used as a waste reduction strategy. 

Chuck Hegberg

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Marcelo Alves <marceloalves@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 11:34 AM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] assistance with field experiments

 

 

Dear colleagues

I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.

I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.

How could I solve this?

I count on your help, thank you.

 

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves

 


Re: assistance with field experiments #fieldtrials

Charles Hegberg
 

Where are you located?  Short of a commercial gasifier with capabilities to handle manures, not sure about small scale production.  You might be better to produce wood char and compost the poultry litter with the biochar which also makes a great product.  Most manure char production is used as a waste reduction strategy. 

Chuck Hegberg

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Marcelo Alves <marceloalves@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 11:34 AM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] assistance with field experiments

 

 

Dear colleagues

I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.

I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.

How could I solve this?

I count on your help, thank you.

 

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves

 


assistance with field experiments #fieldtrials

Marcelo Alves
 


Dear colleagues
I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.
I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.
How could I solve this?
I count on your help, thank you.

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves


Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

mikethewormguy
 

Paul,

Interesting setup for potatoes.  Looks like a technique that can be used if you want to grow potatoes and do not have any land.

We use a trench system to plant the potatoes starts.  We grow a range of different varieties.  We use straw hilling as the plant grows.....

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: experiment with biochar #inoculatedbiochar

mikethewormguy
 

Paul,

Have you done any work using bone char with your fungi.....?

Mike





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

mikethewormguy
 

Kelpie,

As an avid tomato grower, early, middle and late blights are always a challenge.

Some of the steps we take to grow healthy tomatoes.....

1.  We plant our transplants deep knowing they are advantageous rooters....  I amend the hole with a wheat straw biochar, green sand, gypsum, bone char, and diatomaceous earth,  The straw and diatoms are both sources of biogenic silica.

2. Once we get our first flower set, we take all of the branches below the first flowers.  All succeeding flowers will be above the first. Throught out the growing season we keep pruning the plants to both  keep the plant open for air movement and drive the energy to the fruiting.  

3. We use claypot irrigation and stake up the plants.

4. We foliar spray weekly.  First weekly spray is a 10% Garlic Extract amended with zinc, manganese, essential oils, kelp extract and vitamins.  Second  weekly spray is a homemade liquid soap spray amended with diatomaceous earth, kelp extract, and essential oils. These 2 sprays are alternated week to week.  We use Neem, Karanja, and Castor oils to make our liquid soap blend.

It is key to thoroughly wet the plant both stem and leaf when foliar spraying. There will be spores on stem and leaf. Active pruning of the plant reduces the amount of biomass that can get infected.

Each season we grow 10 tomato plants with half being slicers and the other half paste. They are all heirloom indeterminate. varieties. We especially like Black Krim.

Our typical harvest amount is 120lbs per season.  

We use our own garlic to make extracts. The garlic we planted in October has just started to push out of the ground.

A local soap maker taught me how to make soap awhile back. It also does help being a formulator, who has access to ingredients...

my 2 cents....

Mike





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Crushing Charcoal #sizing #crushing

Paul S Anderson
 

Ian,

 

I was not expecting to see those rods inside the jaws.   Quite nice.    Wooden dowels are sufficiently strong to break the char!!!

 

Is there any chance that you could find the full documentation of the char crusher?   That would be very helpful.

 

Credit to be given to Carbon Gold.

 

Thanks,

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ian McChesney via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 5:34 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Crushing Charcoal

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Apologies, Stephen, my mistake, try this one .....Ian 


Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Respected Members,
I found a quite interesting set up (pot) for potato cultivation in garden condition (attached photo). It seems that one can harvest many times from one plant. Is it a realistic approach?
If it's possible then I think it will be better to use biochar with soil to this kind of pot. Because biochar is a porous material and decreases the soil particles' integrity.

Be careful and stay safe.

Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic. 

On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 2:25 PM CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL via groups.io <paulcs2017=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dear Kelpie,
However, I am working on microorganisms associated with the nutrient release of nutrients from biochar but I am interested in the biochar associated plant pathogen control. I was trying to write a review article about the topic but not bale to found sufficient scientific work. Your findings will help us to develop a future research plan. Thank you very much for sharing your findings. The control of botrytis (gray mold) on strawberries and powdery mildew on squash leaves is interesting. Can you please explain in detail.

Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Office 47

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 11:19 AM Nando Breiter <nando@...> wrote:
Hi Kelpie,

You could try growing your tomatoes under a layer of leaf mulch. I don't have time at the moment to search through all the videos this farmer posted, but he's had very good success eliminating all fungal diseases on his tomatoes this way, even when they are left in the open. I think he discusses it here:


I will try this technique this year. I think it comes down to developing a fungal population in the soil - the leaves are a means to do this. 


On Tue, Apr 7, 2020 at 9:06 PM Kelpie Wilson <kelpiew@...> wrote:
I love the current discussions of biochar use in gardening. While this is not peer-reviewed science, as biochar-knowledgeable gardeners, our observations have value. Here are a few things that I have observed:

A foliar spray with micronized biochar and wood vinegar easily defeats botrytis (gray mold) on strawberries and powdery mildew on squash leaves. It also killed rust on my garlic leaves.
Biochar and urine from my biochar urinal added to garden compost accelerates composting like crazy.
Bokashi and biochar buried in trenches in my garden bed fed my collards and kales all winter long, keeping them super productive and healthy. This has supplied most of the winter veg for 5 people from three 4x10 raised beds. And still going strong.
A heavy mulch (about 1 inch) around raspberry canes prevented weeds, managed soil moisture, and made for a very abundant crop last year.
I seem to have defeated symphylans last year by using Bigfoot Mycorrhizae - a product that uses biochar and mycos - added to every transplant. I also used a good amount of crustacean meal which is supposed to promote chitin degrading bacteria and chitinase enzyme.
Since I have been using biochar, I have the most beautiful potatoes ever. No scab, no phytopthera. I never have any soil fungus problems of any kind like fusarium.

I have one big garden problem left - tomato early blight (alternaria solani). The spores can come from anywhere and land on the leaves. Not many varieties have good resistance. It also affects my sunflowers. My biochar wood vinegar spray does not seem to help. Anybody have any ideas, biochar related or not? I am going to try potassium soap early as a preventative, but would love to know about any other ideas.

Lots of time for gardening this year, thanks to quarantine. I hope you all are well.

Thanks,
--
Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890
Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Re: Garden problems solved with biochar #garden

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Dear Kelpie,
However, I am working on microorganisms associated with the nutrient release of nutrients from biochar but I am interested in the biochar associated plant pathogen control. I was trying to write a review article about the topic but not bale to found sufficient scientific work. Your findings will help us to develop a future research plan. Thank you very much for sharing your findings. The control of botrytis (gray mold) on strawberries and powdery mildew on squash leaves is interesting. Can you please explain in detail.

Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Office 47

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 11:19 AM Nando Breiter <nando@...> wrote:
Hi Kelpie,

You could try growing your tomatoes under a layer of leaf mulch. I don't have time at the moment to search through all the videos this farmer posted, but he's had very good success eliminating all fungal diseases on his tomatoes this way, even when they are left in the open. I think he discusses it here:


I will try this technique this year. I think it comes down to developing a fungal population in the soil - the leaves are a means to do this. 


On Tue, Apr 7, 2020 at 9:06 PM Kelpie Wilson <kelpiew@...> wrote:
I love the current discussions of biochar use in gardening. While this is not peer-reviewed science, as biochar-knowledgeable gardeners, our observations have value. Here are a few things that I have observed:

A foliar spray with micronized biochar and wood vinegar easily defeats botrytis (gray mold) on strawberries and powdery mildew on squash leaves. It also killed rust on my garlic leaves.
Biochar and urine from my biochar urinal added to garden compost accelerates composting like crazy.
Bokashi and biochar buried in trenches in my garden bed fed my collards and kales all winter long, keeping them super productive and healthy. This has supplied most of the winter veg for 5 people from three 4x10 raised beds. And still going strong.
A heavy mulch (about 1 inch) around raspberry canes prevented weeds, managed soil moisture, and made for a very abundant crop last year.
I seem to have defeated symphylans last year by using Bigfoot Mycorrhizae - a product that uses biochar and mycos - added to every transplant. I also used a good amount of crustacean meal which is supposed to promote chitin degrading bacteria and chitinase enzyme.
Since I have been using biochar, I have the most beautiful potatoes ever. No scab, no phytopthera. I never have any soil fungus problems of any kind like fusarium.

I have one big garden problem left - tomato early blight (alternaria solani). The spores can come from anywhere and land on the leaves. Not many varieties have good resistance. It also affects my sunflowers. My biochar wood vinegar spray does not seem to help. Anybody have any ideas, biochar related or not? I am going to try potassium soap early as a preventative, but would love to know about any other ideas.

Lots of time for gardening this year, thanks to quarantine. I hope you all are well.

Thanks,
--
Email: kelpiew@...
Mobile: 541-218-9890
Time zone: Pacific Time, USA
Skype: kelpie.wilson


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Re: experiment with biochar #inoculatedbiochar

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Respected Members,
I am very happy to know that you are interested in my research work. It will provide motivation for my experimental work. We are trying to find out the phosphorus availability from biochar after the inoculation of some effective phosphate solubilizing fungi. We choose fungi (not bacteria) because generally fungi are fast-growing and some fungi can grow in a wide range of carbon sources. To be more realistic, we will also inoculate the fungi on soil biochar mixture. We hope this idea will work more efficiently and will increase phosphorus availability in the soil for plant uptake.

Be careful and stay safe.


Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Office 47

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Fri, Mar 20, 2020 at 5:31 PM Marcelo Alves <marceloalves@...> wrote:
Good morning everyone

I am also interested in the results. I work with tropical, sandy and low natural fertility soils and I have started some research with biochar, I believe they can bring big gains. I'm even interested in research partnerships.

Thanks.

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves
Tel. 018 9 9826 9393
Unoeste - Presidente Prudente

De: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> em nome de Gerry Gillespie <gerry.b.gillespie@...>
Enviado: sexta-feira, 20 de março de 2020 00:39
Para: main@biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Assunto: Re: [Biochar] experiment with biochar
 
Paul,

I too would be very interested in your results. Please send me a copy too when you are complete.

I have been making and using inoculants and hydrolysates and using them as biochar activators.

Regards
Gerry Gillespie

On 20 Mar 2020, at 1:07 pm, CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL <paulcs2017@...> wrote:

Dear Jessica,
I am happy to know that you are interested in our project. I will send you the details and the result after the experiment.

Regards,
Paul

On Tue, Mar 17, 2020 at 9:43 AM Jessica Lunsford <enviroagjess@...> wrote:
Chandra I would certainly be interested in your findings. Thank you.

On Mon, 16 Mar 2020, 06:43 CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL, <paulcs2017@...> wrote:
We are inoculating phosphate solubilizing fungus to biochar with a little bit of carbon source (glucose). If anyone interested please let me know.

On Sat, Mar 14, 2020 at 10:59 PM Mike Overby <mike.overby@...> wrote:
Does anyone know of tests of inoculated biochar of different types (side by side comparisons).  Bacterial dominated compost vs vermicompost…. mixed with biochar?

 

Regards,

Mike Overby, PE/CMC
575-377-4512

469-222-6455 – Cell

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Saturday, March 14, 2020 4:15 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] experiment with biochar

 

the biochar is intimately mixed with worm castings so what percentage biochar and what percentage worm castings is in the pot?

 

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 7:45 AM Tom Martwick via Groups.Io <wormer50=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

This is a pic of some broccoli plants I am growing in 100% biochar.  This is biochar that I produce, then bury in worm casting (That I also produce myself).  The plants are doing well and looking very healthy.  

Tom Martwick

PurEarth Products

Phillips, Wi. 54555





Re: Crushing Charcoal #sizing #crushing

Stephen Joseph
 

thanks


On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 8:33 PM Ian McChesney <ian.mcchesney@...> wrote:
Apologies, Stephen, my mistake, try this one .....Ian 


Re: Crushing Charcoal #sizing #crushing

Ian McChesney
 

Apologies, Stephen, my mistake, try this one .....Ian 


Re: Crushing Charcoal #sizing #crushing

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Ian

I got the image from the side not the top.  Can you please check.
Thanks
Stephen

On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 7:32 PM Ian McChesney <ian.mcchesney@...> wrote:
Stephen, apologies for the delay .... image attached is as seen from the top. Commercial jaw crushers shift, or 'rub' together, the two plates while closing to get a better action. The plates operates on different pivots. A simple, single pivot, as we have here, does not work that well - you adjust the amount of crush by how far you 'open' the jaws. If you don't open them a lot you can't add that much more material so it is quite slow - better as a single stage size reducer - but it doesn't cost a lot to make. (and we didn't try with wet char).  

Eli - text me your e-mail +44 7770796755. No Video back then, just pictures.  

Paul - thanks for your kind comments. Credit to Carbon Gold. IBI could accumulate these ideas and charge a few dollars/download. 

Yes, this is the self-cleaning version ! Tricky to perfect, but we got there ............., Ian McC 


Re: Crushing Charcoal #sizing #crushing

Ian McChesney
 

Stephen, apologies for the delay .... image attached is as seen from the top. Commercial jaw crushers shift, or 'rub' together, the two plates while closing to get a better action. The plates operates on different pivots. A simple, single pivot, as we have here, does not work that well - you adjust the amount of crush by how far you 'open' the jaws. If you don't open them a lot you can't add that much more material so it is quite slow - better as a single stage size reducer - but it doesn't cost a lot to make. (and we didn't try with wet char).  

Eli - text me your e-mail +44 7770796755. No Video back then, just pictures.  

Paul - thanks for your kind comments. Credit to Carbon Gold. IBI could accumulate these ideas and charge a few dollars/download. 

Yes, this is the self-cleaning version ! Tricky to perfect, but we got there ............., Ian McC 

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