Date   

Strategy for Evaluating Soil Health Measurements #soilhealth

Tom Miles
 

How can this strategy for evaluating soil health encourage the use of biochar? Will it show improvements (or losses) from biochar application?

 

 

Soil Health Institute Publishes Strategy for Evaluating Soil Health Measurements

 

The first of many publications associated with the North American Project to Evaluate Soil Health Measurements (NAPESHM) has been published open source in Agronomy Journal.

 

“Introducing the North American Project to Evaluate Soil Health Measurements” describes the rationale, approach, and methods used in this continental-scale, collaborative soil health research project conducted by SHI. The paper documents the core strategic design, soil health measurements being evaluated, methods used, and sites participating in the US, Canada, and Mexico.

 

The overall goal of the project is to identify the most effective measures of soil health across a wide range of climates, production systems, management practices, and inherent soil properties. The paper also provides other researchers and stakeholders a clear roadmap for obtaining results relevant to the database being developed and offers a reference for protocols used by SHI.

 

Read Now at https://acsess.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/agj2.20234

 

The paper was co-authored by Charlotte E. Norris, G. Mac Bean, Shannon B. Cappellazzi, Michael Cope, Kelsey L.H. Greub, Daniel Liptzin, Elizabeth L. Rieke, Paul W. Tracy, Cristine L.S. Morgan, and C. Wayne Honeycutt.

 

SHI would like to thank the NAPESHM Scientists for spearheading the effort, as well as more than 80 Partnering Scientists from across academia, federal agencies, and the private sector who are making this project possible. SHI also thanks the project’s funders: The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, and General Mills, for their generosity.

 

Future papers will describe the results of SHI’s evaluation of approximately 30 soil health indicators across North America.

 

Tom

 

Tom Miles

Executive Director

U.S. Biochar Initiative

"Promoting the Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar"

www.biochar-us.org

@USbiochar

Facebook US Biochar Initiative

USBI Logo - Copy (420x176) 

 


Re: Accidental Wood Char #flamecap #compost

John Hofmeyr
 

Hello, Mike. 
I'm a chemist, not a soil biologist, so take this whence it comes. Neat idea but, at the risk of 'teaching granny to suck eggs':
When freshly-made biochar is applied to soil, it will adsorb moisture and extant nutrients from the bulk soil onto the pore surfaces.
There the nutrients will be held, probably not in plant-available form.
And because the char is not yet colonised by microbiota, so it will take some time to perform many of its functions. Especially the mycorrhizal fungi will be absent because those types of biota are associated with plant roots. In the absence of plant roots - no mycorrhizae.
Would it be better to mix the char into your vermicast for a few weeks before applying to the soil? If you do that, remember that the char will adsorb moisture from the castings. Moisture control may be necessary. 
Or place the fresh char in your mature compost for, say, 3 weeks before applying to your soil? Again, moisture control may be important; I understand that, if the moisture content drops below 30%m/m, the mycorrhizae will die off and only the spores will survive. That means more time required before the spores can establish new fungi (again, only in the presence of roots.)
Any soil biologist on the group, please correct anything which I have misunderstood. 


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Kevin McLean
 

Paul,

We are together on this.  I would love to see truly clean cooking in every household in the world.  But that won't happen in my lifetime.  For those who will continue cooking with dirty cookstoves for the foreseeable future, let's improve those stoves.  Let's not let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

You are familiar with rock beds that Sun24 is training women to use.  I'd never cook with them in a 3-stone cookstove in my house.  But they are a huge improvement over 3-stone without rock beds.

If we can find a way for these poor people to cook that is a little easier, a little cleaner, a little cheaper, a little better for forests and climate change, that's awesome.  If it produces a little biochar that improves their crop production while sequestering carbon, even more awesome.

Kevin


On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 2:07 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Kevin,

 

Yes, cylindrical will work.   But the issue remains about being a stove first and biochar as a “co-benefit.”   MANY persons have spent time on this.   There is no easy answer, especially when emissions measurements are “required”.   Or said another way, there is no “sufficiently inexpensive” biochar-producing stove (yet), with inexpensive being defined US$10 or less and  will last for some  moderate time (3 months, but they want 3+ years of use for almost no price).   The better stoves can last longer, but there is need for “subsidy” or sponsorship to get the cost covered to then get the stoves into the hands of the impoverished households.  

 

CLEAN burning has been proven in the TLUD / gasifier stove category.   But that technology still has not received the traction for success.   Efforts are directed toward business models and carbon  credits and other issues (such as use of pellet fuel) to try to get some backing.   Several efforts are continuing, but all with industrially produced stoves, each with specific features that can become limitations in the eyes of the funders.  

 

Note that this discussion is on the Biochar Discussion Group.   The Stove listserv is VERY quiet for many months now.   Why?   IMO, because the issue of CLEAN burning is clearly dominated by the char-producing stoves.   And in your case, and in Ron’s (and  increasingly in mine), it is the biochar that is driving the discussion.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin McLean via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 11:24 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

Any suggestions for improvement?

 

Does the shape need to be conical?  Will cylindrical work?

 

Use as a cookstove is the first priority or it will not be used.  The goals are efficient, clean and able to use agricultural waste as fuel.  Biochar would be a huge plus.

 

Thanks,

Kevin

 

 

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 9:37 PM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Kevin,

 

What you describe is classic, as follows:

 

1.  It is a TLUD, but without any concentrator nor riser;  works that way on the downward pyrolysis of the initial load of biomass.    Small diameter can work but is not optimal.

 

2.  But open top allows you to keep adding fuel which is heated from below, as would be in a retort, and makes additional gases (retort style, not TLUD with a migratory pyrolytic front MPF)), which is fine.   And if a flame is maintained above the newly added fuel, there can be some “flame cap” functions to help make the charcoal.

 

3.  Massive amount of info about control and turndown and how to support the cooking pot, etc. is in the Stove Listserv archives, and much at www.drtlud.com.

If your goal is to make biochar, what you show is fine.   If the goal is a cookstove, better check the 2 decades of TLUD stove work.    If you want to do both, then the cookstove approach is the major concern and the biochar will be available with each meal preparation.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin McLean via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 1:51 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folder This video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Paul S Anderson
 

Kevin,

 

Yes, cylindrical will work.   But the issue remains about being a stove first and biochar as a “co-benefit.”   MANY persons have spent time on this.   There is no easy answer, especially when emissions measurements are “required”.   Or said another way, there is no “sufficiently inexpensive” biochar-producing stove (yet), with inexpensive being defined US$10 or less and  will last for some  moderate time (3 months, but they want 3+ years of use for almost no price).   The better stoves can last longer, but there is need for “subsidy” or sponsorship to get the cost covered to then get the stoves into the hands of the impoverished households.  

 

CLEAN burning has been proven in the TLUD / gasifier stove category.   But that technology still has not received the traction for success.   Efforts are directed toward business models and carbon  credits and other issues (such as use of pellet fuel) to try to get some backing.   Several efforts are continuing, but all with industrially produced stoves, each with specific features that can become limitations in the eyes of the funders.  

 

Note that this discussion is on the Biochar Discussion Group.   The Stove listserv is VERY quiet for many months now.   Why?   IMO, because the issue of CLEAN burning is clearly dominated by the char-producing stoves.   And in your case, and in Ron’s (and  increasingly in mine), it is the biochar that is driving the discussion.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin McLean via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 11:24 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

Any suggestions for improvement?

 

Does the shape need to be conical?  Will cylindrical work?

 

Use as a cookstove is the first priority or it will not be used.  The goals are efficient, clean and able to use agricultural waste as fuel.  Biochar would be a huge plus.

 

Thanks,

Kevin

 

 

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 9:37 PM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Kevin,

 

What you describe is classic, as follows:

 

1.  It is a TLUD, but without any concentrator nor riser;  works that way on the downward pyrolysis of the initial load of biomass.    Small diameter can work but is not optimal.

 

2.  But open top allows you to keep adding fuel which is heated from below, as would be in a retort, and makes additional gases (retort style, not TLUD with a migratory pyrolytic front MPF)), which is fine.   And if a flame is maintained above the newly added fuel, there can be some “flame cap” functions to help make the charcoal.

 

3.  Massive amount of info about control and turndown and how to support the cooking pot, etc. is in the Stove Listserv archives, and much at www.drtlud.com.

If your goal is to make biochar, what you show is fine.   If the goal is a cookstove, better check the 2 decades of TLUD stove work.    If you want to do both, then the cookstove approach is the major concern and the biochar will be available with each meal preparation.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin McLean via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 1:51 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folder This video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Kevin McLean
 

Paul,

Any suggestions for improvement?

Does the shape need to be conical?  Will cylindrical work?

Use as a cookstove is the first priority or it will not be used.  The goals are efficient, clean and able to use agricultural waste as fuel.  Biochar would be a huge plus.

Thanks,
Kevin


On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 9:37 PM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Kevin,

 

What you describe is classic, as follows:

 

1.  It is a TLUD, but without any concentrator nor riser;  works that way on the downward pyrolysis of the initial load of biomass.    Small diameter can work but is not optimal.

 

2.  But open top allows you to keep adding fuel which is heated from below, as would be in a retort, and makes additional gases (retort style, not TLUD with a migratory pyrolytic front MPF)), which is fine.   And if a flame is maintained above the newly added fuel, there can be some “flame cap” functions to help make the charcoal.

 

3.  Massive amount of info about control and turndown and how to support the cooking pot, etc. is in the Stove Listserv archives, and much at www.drtlud.com.

If your goal is to make biochar, what you show is fine.   If the goal is a cookstove, better check the 2 decades of TLUD stove work.    If you want to do both, then the cookstove approach is the major concern and the biochar will be available with each meal preparation.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin McLean via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 1:51 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folder This video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Kevin McLean
 

Hi John,

These pots are fragile and crack.  You are right about quenching with water.  The better practice would be to spread the char out on the ground.  I'm using the pots for testing only.  The clay pots they make in Africa are far more durable. 

Kevin


On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 9:05 PM Chin-hung LIU <johnliu38@...> wrote:
Dear Kevin,

Thank you for sharing such clever idea!!  I am also very interested in
this kind of "appropriate technology".  I will get a clay pot, give it
a try, and give you some feedback!
My only concern is the durability of clay pot.  You mentioned that you
quenched the fire with water. Isn't it supposed to be cool down slowly
after burning?

John Liu
Taiwan Biochar Initiative




Re: Carbon-negative geochar from methane #hydrothermalcarbonization #methane

sevclarke@...
 

Robert,
No, What mainly led me conceptually to develop the Winwick drillhole technology was the need to process the microalgae that would be grown in my cost-effective Winwick bioreactors. When I saw the potential of gravity well reactors, combined with the amazing energetics of decavitating bubbles, this caused me to widen the scope to form the basis for a fairly comprehensive biorefinery industry. Most readers will not know that when a bubble decavitates an instantaneous temperature of around 5,000C is generated, along with an intense micro-pressure wave and two penetrating microjets. The instantaneous nature of bubble decavitation energetics should tend to prevent undesirable back-reactions that reduce yields from occurring. These fleeting effects, combined with those of supercritical water, should be able to facilitate many desirable physicochemical reactions at high energy-efficiencies. For those interested I attach two documents that describes how these effects might be used to advantage. Owners of stranded methane assets and distributed biomethane generators might do well to consider combining methane splitting methods that generate geochar and hydrogen using renewable energy with NovoNutrients' method of fermenting hydrogen and waste CO2 to produce readily-stored and transported protein.
Sev


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Paul S Anderson
 

Kevin,

 

What you describe is classic, as follows:

 

1.  It is a TLUD, but without any concentrator nor riser;  works that way on the downward pyrolysis of the initial load of biomass.    Small diameter can work but is not optimal.

 

2.  But open top allows you to keep adding fuel which is heated from below, as would be in a retort, and makes additional gases (retort style, not TLUD with a migratory pyrolytic front MPF)), which is fine.   And if a flame is maintained above the newly added fuel, there can be some “flame cap” functions to help make the charcoal.

 

3.  Massive amount of info about control and turndown and how to support the cooking pot, etc. is in the Stove Listserv archives, and much at www.drtlud.com.

If your goal is to make biochar, what you show is fine.   If the goal is a cookstove, better check the 2 decades of TLUD stove work.    If you want to do both, then the cookstove approach is the major concern and the biochar will be available with each meal preparation.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin McLean via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 1:51 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folder This video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Chin-hung LIU
 

Dear Kevin,

Thank you for sharing such clever idea!! I am also very interested in
this kind of "appropriate technology". I will get a clay pot, give it
a try, and give you some feedback!
My only concern is the durability of clay pot. You mentioned that you
quenched the fire with water. Isn't it supposed to be cool down slowly
after burning?

John Liu
Taiwan Biochar Initiative


FW: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Kevin Chisholm <kchisholm@...>
 

 

Hi Greg

 

I have used such terra cotta pots, for “stove purposes” several years ago and found them to be very prone to cracking.  They are very porous, and the pot itself can adsorb a lot of moisture. May I suggest that you put the pot (or pots) in an oven, and heat them to 100+ degrees C, to dry them out before using them for a stove?

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of greg geisler
Sent: May 7, 2020 6:36 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD

 

That is brilliant and a great method for getting people to do backyard biochar. I would have thought that the level of combustion in such a small volume would not be sufficient to create char. I'm going to give this a go tomorrow! Thanks!

 

I gave up my huge retort system (a 16 gal drum inside a 55 gal drum) because I am in the city and it was difficult to maintain. I have been using a potato chip can (roughly a cubic foot) that I stuff with twigs and shop-drops and roll it around in a raging firepit. It works but I get small volumes.

 

g

 

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 2:35 PM Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folderThis video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

mikethewormguy
 

Kevin,

Clay Pot Char......A great idea....  I am going to try it.

This idea could be coupled with clay pot irrigation for many synergistic outcomes.  Our website (www.onagreenquest.net) has information regarding clay pot irrigation......  

Thanks for sharing.......

Mike


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Daniel Pidgeon
 

Hi Kevin,

The flames are doing a great job of capping things, and I like that you can obviously see the gases roiling up from below, but they are being fully consumed.

I had heard that adding more on top of a TLUD was fraught with problems. But I do remember Paul Anderson conversing with somebody about running a TLUD to completion, THEN closing off the bottom and adding more on top for flame cap pyrolysis. Topic heading on the Groups.IO site is "Flame cap on top of finished TLUD pyrolysis".

Daniel



From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Friday, 8 May 2020 4:50 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD
 
Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folder This video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

greg geisler
 

That is brilliant and a great method for getting people to do backyard biochar. I would have thought that the level of combustion in such a small volume would not be sufficient to create char. I'm going to give this a go tomorrow! Thanks!

I gave up my huge retort system (a 16 gal drum inside a 55 gal drum) because I am in the city and it was difficult to maintain. I have been using a potato chip can (roughly a cubic foot) that I stuff with twigs and shop-drops and roll it around in a raging firepit. It works but I get small volumes.

g

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 2:35 PM Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:
Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folderThis video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Re: Accidental Wood Char #flamecap #compost

Tom Miles
 

Nice work. Thanks!

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of mikethewormguy via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2020 10:55 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Accidental Wood Char

 

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 08:18 PM, Tom Miles wrote:

As we receive news and videos from Warm Heart International’s projects in Malawi, Kenya, and Ghana it is gratifying to see smallholders benefitting from biochar they can make themselves. Warm Heart is having a big impact with no budget and a lot of good will. Their smallholders are making biochar from corn cobs in TLUDs and maize stalks in pit kilns. They are using it with manure in their crops and feeding it to their poultry, pigs and cattle. Using crop residues for biochar instead of simply burning them provides an important resource to increase their soil and animal health, not to mention the charcoal savings. (The cooking charcoal challenge is huge in Africa. An estimated 50 million tons of charcoal is produced from 400 million tons of wood. By 2050 it is expected that they will need 115 million tons of charcoal from a billion tonnes of wood.)

 

Congratulations to all those who are working on biochar projects in Africa. Let’s expand those programs.         


 Tom,

Below is a picture of what turned out to be accidental flame cap tree branch char.....

The fire pit is 3 feet across, 20 inches deep and lined by brick and rock.....

We did some extensive pruning of trees on Monday.  I spent about 3 hours Tuesday morning burning all of the tree trimmings in the fire pit. When I was done I burning I decided to quench the fire with water rather then let the fire burn down to ash.

By water quenching the fire, I was rewarded with a 10 inch deep pile of charred pieces of tree trimmings 3 feet across. 

Today I dug the charred pieces out of the pit and I broadcasted lightly these pieces evenly over the top of the garden beds that will planted out in 30 days.  Using a shovel, I turned over the soil in the beds which brought the char pieces into the soil horizon....

Now I need to remember what I did accidentally to make this pit char.on purpose next time......
.
Mike


Re: 37 things you need to know about the new IPCC report: We Don't Have Time #ipcc

Kim Chaffee
 

Hi Wayne,

Thanks.  That’s what I get for typing too fast.  I meant N2O.  But I didn’t know about the mechanism by which biochar in soil reduces N2O emissions.  Thanks for explaining it.  Is it the increase in soil porosity (between the grains of biochar and the surrounding soil matter?) that helps keep soil from being anaerobic?  

KIm




On May 7, 2020, at 3:01 PM, Teel, Wayne <teelws@...> wrote:

Kim,
 
N2O is the greenhouse gas, 300 times more forcing than CO2.  NO2 is not, but will generate ozone, which is, on sunny days.  NO2 is only produced in internal combustion engines, not in the soil.  N2O is the opposite, and will be produced in soil if conditions are anaerobic or partially so.  This is why biochar helps, it lowers the chances of the soil becoming anaerobic.
 
Wayne
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kim Chaffee
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 1:27 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] 37 things you need to know about the new IPCC report: We Don't Have Time
 
All,
 
According to this story, the new IPCC report focuses on the need to keep the global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C., not 2.0 C.  It compares both the consequences of the extra 0.5 C increase, as well as the actions needed to prevent it.  Several of the 37 highlights in this summary have special relevance to biochar:
 
"19. Methane and black carbon, both more potent greenhouse gases, will need to be cut by at least 35% by 2050, compared to 2010. But cuts in non-CO2 emissions must be made carefully. If more bioenergy is used to replace fossil fuels, it could push up climate-warming nitrous oxide pollution from agriculture."
 
Large scale use of biochar could significantly reduce NO2 emissions.  If by “black carbon” they mean soot from incineration, biochar be a big help there too.  See also highlights 29 thru 34, all of which, IMHO, support the scaling up of biochar.  
 
Kim
 
 
 
 
BTW,  We Don’t Have Time bills itself as "the world largest social network for climate action”.  They could become an opinion influencer for biochar.  Does anyone know their leaders?  
 



Re: 37 things you need to know about the new IPCC report: We Don't Have Time #ipcc

Teel, Wayne
 

Kim,

 

N2O is the greenhouse gas, 300 times more forcing than CO2.  NO2 is not, but will generate ozone, which is, on sunny days.  NO2 is only produced in internal combustion engines, not in the soil.  N2O is the opposite, and will be produced in soil if conditions are anaerobic or partially so.  This is why biochar helps, it lowers the chances of the soil becoming anaerobic.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kim Chaffee
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 1:27 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] 37 things you need to know about the new IPCC report: We Don't Have Time

 

All,

 

According to this story, the new IPCC report focuses on the need to keep the global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C., not 2.0 C.  It compares both the consequences of the extra 0.5 C increase, as well as the actions needed to prevent it.  Several of the 37 highlights in this summary have special relevance to biochar:

 

"19. Methane and black carbon, both more potent greenhouse gases, will need to be cut by at least 35% by 2050, compared to 2010. But cuts in non-CO2 emissions must be made carefully. If more bioenergy is used to replace fossil fuels, it could push up climate-warming nitrous oxide pollution from agriculture."

 

Large scale use of biochar could significantly reduce NO2 emissions.  If by “black carbon” they mean soot from incineration, biochar be a big help there too.  See also highlights 29 thru 34, all of which, IMHO, support the scaling up of biochar.  

 

Kim

 

 

 

 

BTW,  We Don’t Have Time bills itself as "the world largest social network for climate action”.  They could become an opinion influencer for biochar.  Does anyone know their leaders?  

 


Biochar-making Cookstove, Top Lit - Not a TLUD #cookstove

Kevin McLean
 

Have any of you tried this and can you provide direction? 



I put additional holes in the bottom of a terra cotta pot.  I filled the pot with hardwood chips to 2" below the top and lit the top of the fuel.  Once the fire was strong, I added a handful of fuel every few minutes.  The level of the fuel remained the same throughout, about 2" from the top.  I quenched with water after 30 minutes. 

The fire burned very clean.  The result was about 50% biochar (by volume, compared to the total fuel used).  There was just a little unburnt wood that had not turned to char.

What seems to be happening is the heat from the fire pyrolyses the fuel below.  The pyrolysis gasses rise to the fire and ignite.  More photos and videos are in this folderThis video is particularly interesting.  Note the flame on the left side curling over the trapped smoke.

This method can probably be used with agricultural waste such as corn cobs and stalks.  There are many ways to place a cookpot above the fire.  We don't have a good way to turn down the heat, yet.

Ron Larson and I have been trying to design low-cost cookstoves that make biochar.  If we are successful, the Catholic Church can probably train smallholder farmers in Africa to make and use biochar to improve crop production.

If you have done something like this, I hope you will share your experiences.

Kevin


Accidental Wood Char #flamecap #compost

mikethewormguy
 

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 08:18 PM, Tom Miles wrote:

As we receive news and videos from Warm Heart International’s projects in Malawi, Kenya, and Ghana it is gratifying to see smallholders benefitting from biochar they can make themselves. Warm Heart is having a big impact with no budget and a lot of good will. Their smallholders are making biochar from corn cobs in TLUDs and maize stalks in pit kilns. They are using it with manure in their crops and feeding it to their poultry, pigs and cattle. Using crop residues for biochar instead of simply burning them provides an important resource to increase their soil and animal health, not to mention the charcoal savings. (The cooking charcoal challenge is huge in Africa. An estimated 50 million tons of charcoal is produced from 400 million tons of wood. By 2050 it is expected that they will need 115 million tons of charcoal from a billion tonnes of wood.)

 

Congratulations to all those who are working on biochar projects in Africa. Let’s expand those programs.         


 Tom,

Below is a picture of what turned out to be accidental flame cap tree branch char.....

The fire pit is 3 feet across, 20 inches deep and lined by brick and rock.....

We did some extensive pruning of trees on Monday.  I spent about 3 hours Tuesday morning burning all of the tree trimmings in the fire pit. When I was done I burning I decided to quench the fire with water rather then let the fire burn down to ash.

By water quenching the fire, I was rewarded with a 10 inch deep pile of charred pieces of tree trimmings 3 feet across. 

Today I dug the charred pieces out of the pit and I broadcasted lightly these pieces evenly over the top of the garden beds that will planted out in 30 days.  Using a shovel, I turned over the soil in the beds which brought the char pieces into the soil horizon....

Now I need to remember what I did accidentally to make this pit char.on purpose next time......
.
Mike


37 things you need to know about the new IPCC report: We Don't Have Time #ipcc

Kim Chaffee
 

All,

According to this story, the new IPCC report focuses on the need to keep the global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees C., not 2.0 C.  It compares both the consequences of the extra 0.5 C increase, as well as the actions needed to prevent it.  Several of the 37 highlights in this summary have special relevance to biochar:

"19. Methane and black carbon, both more potent greenhouse gases, will need to be cut by at least 35% by 2050, compared to 2010. But cuts in non-CO2 emissions must be made carefully. If more bioenergy is used to replace fossil fuels, it could push up climate-warming nitrous oxide pollution from agriculture."

Large scale use of biochar could significantly reduce NO2 emissions.  If by “black carbon” they mean soot from incineration, biochar be a big help there too.  See also highlights 29 thru 34, all of which, IMHO, support the scaling up of biochar.  

Kim




BTW,  We Don’t Have Time bills itself as "the world largest social network for climate action”.  They could become an opinion influencer for biochar.  Does anyone know their leaders?  


[CDR] New book out: Nature-Based Solutions to 21st Century Challenges #climate

Ron Larson
 

List,  cc Wil:

I’d buy or rent this as an e-book if I thought it had any value in promoting biochar.    But after reading this 
by the author and a bit more,  I decided it likely doesn’t discuss biochar or even the concept of coupling soil, CDR, and “nature-based-solutions”. 
,
 Anyone know better?

But in that search,  I found a lot of PR value for biochar in emphasizing that biochar fits this “nature based solution” theme very well.  BECCS and inorganic fertilizers,  biochar’s pricipal competitors, do not.   Lots of interesting-sounding books and articles with terms like "nature-based-solutions”.

Ron


Begin forwarded message:

From: Wil Burns <wil@...>
Subject: [CDR] New book out: Nature-Based Solutions to 21st Century Challenges
Date: May 6, 2020 at 8:56:17 PM MDT
To: "'Carbon Dioxide Removal Group (CarbonDioxideRemoval@...)'" <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>

FYI. wil

[Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy]
Wil Burns, Co-Director & Professor of Research
Institute for Carbon Removal Law & Policy | American University
Phone: 650.281.9126
Web: www.american.edu/sis/centers/carbon-removal<https://www.american.edu/sis/centers/carbon-removal/>
Email: wburns@...<mailto:wburns@...>
Skype: wil.burns<skype:wil.burns?chat>
Address: 917 Forest Ave. #3S, Evanston, IL 60202 USA
Follow us:
[https://img.mysignature.io/s/v3/7/c/f/7cf1bbde-db4e-51b2-ac59-ab19344bad51.png]<https://www.facebook.com/Institute-for-Carbon-Removal-Law-and-Policy-336916007065063/>
[https://img.mysignature.io/s/v3/c/8/9/c897a27d-c2c0-5e72-b299-b784e320fe4d.png]<https://twitter.com/CarbonRemovalAU>


From: Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences <AESS@...> On Behalf Of Robert Brears
Sent: Wednesday, May 6, 2020 6:01 PM
To: AESS@...
Subject: [AESS_LIST] New book out: Nature-Based Solutions to 21st Century Challenges

Dear All,

Nature-based Solutions to 21st Century Challenges has just been published with Routledge

The book systematically reviews nature-based solutions from a public policy angle, assessing policy developments which encourage the implementation of nature-based solutions to address societal challenges while simultaneously providing human well-being and biodiversity benefits.

This includes: Developing Climate Change Mitigation, Developing Climate Change Adaptation, Restoring Degraded Ecosystems, Enhancing Sustainable Urbanisation, Improving Disaster Risk Management and Resilience, Adaptive Management and Nature-Based Solutions, and Financing Nature-Based Solutions.

This book will be of great interest to policymakers, practitioners and researchers involved in nature-based solutions, sustainable urban planning, environmental management, and sustainable development generally.

The details of the book are:
Author: Robert C. Brears
ISBN 9780367266899
Published April 7, 2020 by Routledge
338 Pages - 2 B/W Illustrations
Available at: https://www.routledge.com/Nature-Based-Solutions-to-21st-Century-Challenges/Brears/p/book/9780367266899

Kind regards,

Robert C. Brears

________________________________

To learn more about and/or join AESS, go to www.aessonline.org<http://www.aessonline.org>.

________________________________

To unsubscribe from the AESS list, click the following link:
https://listserv.ursinus.edu:88/scripts/wa.exe?TICKET=NzM3NTgxIHdpbEBGRVJPTklBLk9SRyBBRVNTIEJPt7iIhSCC&c=SIGNOFF

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Carbon Dioxide Removal" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to CarbonDioxideRemoval+unsubscribe@....
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/CarbonDioxideRemoval/BY5PR04MB6737D87531BF30494DE4C730A4A50%40BY5PR04MB6737.namprd04.prod.outlook.com.

3261 - 3280 of 30803