Date   

Re: A question about biochar as a decontaminate #contaminate

Tom Miles
 

Wayne,

 

There are at least three published papers on the South River project which are all behind a pay wall.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Teel, Wayne
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2020 4:58 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] A question about biochar as a decontaminate

 

Michael,

 

The South River Science Team based in Waynesboro, VA has done a number of longer term studies on mercury contamination in the river which comes in from eroding stream banks and contaminated soil leaching.  They have found that biochar (some sourced from Biochar Now in Colorado) does mitigate a substantial portion of the contamination from these sources.  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0883292718300428?via%3Dihub  (This is just the abstract.  There might be an Elsevier pay wall, but I have not pursued that.)

 

While the article is typical of science publications and calls for more studies, a standard practice, biochar is near the top of the mitigation techniques they use.  Of course this is for mercury, not lead, but I would suspect the same is true for that positive ion.  It is not frivolous, but it is also not without cost.  The real question is whether the costs are exceeded by the damage that mitigation would prevent.  We are not always good at answering that question.

 

Wayne

 

Wayne S. Teel

701 Carrier Drive

ISAT MSC 4102

Harrisonburg, VA 22807

Phone: 540-568-2798

Fax: 540-568-2761

E-mail: teelws@...

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 11:43:00 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] A question about biochar as a decontaminate

 

There are lots of articles about the effectiveness of biochar as a heavy metal decontaminate (China/cadmium in rice paddies; Europe/lead at brownfields; US/old mine tailings, mercury). i have three questions: (1) Is it therefore reasonable to suggest the application of biochar soil amendment to urban lawns and playing fields to lock up low level lead contamination? or (2) to suggest the addition of biochar to stormwater drain systems to lock up, for example, low-level lead contamination in drain sediment during the mixing that takes place following a storm? Finally, (3) Is it reasonable to suggest the application of biochar to decontaminate flood mud or areas once covered in flood mud?

 

I am sure that there are preferred feedstocks, pyrolysis temps, etc. for each contaminate type, but my question is more general. It is really, "Is there any point? Anything to gain?" or would such an exercise be a total waste of money and frivolous?

 

Michael Shafer


 

photo

Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

 

    


Re: A question about biochar as a decontaminate #contaminate

Teel, Wayne
 

Michael,


The South River Science Team based in Waynesboro, VA has done a number of longer term studies on mercury contamination in the river which comes in from eroding stream banks and contaminated soil leaching.  They have found that biochar (some sourced from Biochar Now in Colorado) does mitigate a substantial portion of the contamination from these sources.  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0883292718300428?via%3Dihub  (This is just the abstract.  There might be an Elsevier pay wall, but I have not pursued that.)


While the article is typical of science publications and calls for more studies, a standard practice, biochar is near the top of the mitigation techniques they use.  Of course this is for mercury, not lead, but I would suspect the same is true for that positive ion.  It is not frivolous, but it is also not without cost.  The real question is whether the costs are exceeded by the damage that mitigation would prevent.  We are not always good at answering that question.


Wayne


Wayne S. Teel
701 Carrier Drive
ISAT MSC 4102
Harrisonburg, VA 22807
Phone: 540-568-2798
Fax: 540-568-2761
 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 11:43:00 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] A question about biochar as a decontaminate
 
There are lots of articles about the effectiveness of biochar as a heavy metal decontaminate (China/cadmium in rice paddies; Europe/lead at brownfields; US/old mine tailings, mercury). i have three questions: (1) Is it therefore reasonable to suggest the application of biochar soil amendment to urban lawns and playing fields to lock up low level lead contamination? or (2) to suggest the addition of biochar to stormwater drain systems to lock up, for example, low-level lead contamination in drain sediment during the mixing that takes place following a storm? Finally, (3) Is it reasonable to suggest the application of biochar to decontaminate flood mud or areas once covered in flood mud?

I am sure that there are preferred feedstocks, pyrolysis temps, etc. for each contaminate type, but my question is more general. It is really, "Is there any point? Anything to gain?" or would such an exercise be a total waste of money and frivolous?

Michael Shafer


photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand


Re: Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine #urine

Kim Chaffee
 

Kevin,

Thanks for offering to reach out to the Rich Earth folks about joining our biochar chat group.  

I just came across this posting on Rich Earth’s website.  They are setting up a “National Gold Ribbon Committee for Urine Reuse”.  As they say in the introduction, "Our project goal is to create rules and policies for a national urine reuse standard, so it can be further adopted into state and local site development and building codes. They are asking anyone who is interested to fill out a form.  Anyone on this list who is interested and has the time may want to fill out the form. Please let the rest of us know if you join their Committee. See link below.

Kim

  

On Sep 24, 2020, at 12:14 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

I'll be happy to reach out to them, upon receiving permission from Tom.  There is a lot of overlap.

On Thu, Sep 24, 2020 at 12:05 AM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
Kevin,

Thanks to you and Frank for your posts.  I saw on Rich Earth's website that they had held a Virtual Summit recently.  Glad you presented, so their audience could learn about biochar.  Their website says that about 120 people from all over the world attend their first online Summit, (which was their 6th Summit overall).  

If you know the people at Rich Earth, what do you think of inviting some of them to join this list serve group, assuming Tom Miles is okay with that?  I think we could learn a lot from them and vice versa.  If you’d rather, I’d be happy to reach out to them.  (Many years ago, I used to live a few miles from Brattleboro, Vermont, where they’re headquartered.)

Kim    


On Sep 23, 2020, at 11:06 PM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Kim, the Rich Earth Institute does excellent work with urine.  It held its three-day virtual summit last week, at which I briefly presented on this topic.  The summit was recorded and can be viewed here.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:44 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
All,

Just in case you haven’t heard of them, there is an organization here in the US that promotes the use of human urine in agriculture.  It’s called the Rich Earth Institute and they are headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont (in New England).  If you’re curious, here is their website:  http://richearthinstitute.org/ .  They are trying to develop standards for urine use in agriculture.  I don’t know whether there are similar organizations in other countries.    

Kim Chaffee

http://richearthinstitute.org/ 

On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Thanks, Frank.  We are moving toward this model which allows poor smallholder farmers to collect, charge and store biochar year round:

Put an empty charcoal/rice bag in a hole in the ground.  These inexpensive PP bags are porous.  As the char is made, add it and urine to the bag.  When the bag is full, the char should be charged and excess liquid will have drained away.  Put the bag of biochar out and store it for the planting season.  Put another empty bag in the hole and start the process again.

Most smallholder farmers have little or no manure and don't know how to compost.  We will recommend they add whatever manure they have to the biochar.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 6:33 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Yes Kevin,
your description of reasoning , methodology, time allowed and credible considerations  are all aiming at best practice and superb developments.
If you make the biochar you may like to quench and soak the char in the urine at the earliest (hot, warm, ultra-dry) stage. The follow the process as you outlined.
Have lots of productive fun and please take photos of the effects your Biochar process has on the production in the garden and on the land to share here with the network/ discussion group.
Best regards and thanks for sharing
Frank



From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of jim karnofski
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 6:17 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Kevin,

 

Urine charged biochar:

 

The purpose of using urine-soaked biochar is to recycle nutrients and charge the dry, sterile biochar.

 

First, I mix in active compost with the sterile char so there are hungry microbes lurking when the urine is poured through the mix.

 

Second, the container is large and has small holes in the bottom allowing the excess liquid to slowly drip out the bottom.  You will find contaminated water strained through charcoal comes out mostly pure as the nutrients are stripped from aqueous solution to reside within the biochar.

 

Third, this charged biochar is then mixed into the rough side of my compost pile which helps preserve the detritus from gassing off as it rots while also integrating with the other soil microbes.

 

Fourth, the working raw pile of compost is turned into a finished pile of compost to sit until cool.

 

By the time this material is applied to the garden soil, the microbiology has done its magic. No worries. Aerobic compost has a healthy smell with dominant non-pathogenic bacteria that have their way with the bad bacteria.

 

If plated and isolated very carefully, healthy soil probably contains something of everything in its makeup. Immerse into this biological cloud sans mask and gloves. Eat the occasional raw beet, carrot, or potato fresh from the garden with a patina of dirt. It's all good.

 

Just do it because it is the right thing to do.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 5:09 AM
To: Biochar Listserv <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Does biochar charged with urine need to be stored for a month before application?

 

The WHO recommends that urine to be applied as fertilizer on food crops that are processed should be stored for a month to kill pathogens.  Urine should be stored for six months for crops that are eaten raw.  Is there a similar storage requirement for biochar charged with urine (or manure)?

 

Thank you,

Kevin

 

Kevin McLean, President

Sun24

Tampa, Florida, USA

+1 (813) 505-3340

 

                     











Re: Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine #urine

Kevin McLean
 

I'll be happy to reach out to them, upon receiving permission from Tom.  There is a lot of overlap.

On Thu, Sep 24, 2020 at 12:05 AM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
Kevin,

Thanks to you and Frank for your posts.  I saw on Rich Earth's website that they had held a Virtual Summit recently.  Glad you presented, so their audience could learn about biochar.  Their website says that about 120 people from all over the world attend their first online Summit, (which was their 6th Summit overall).  

If you know the people at Rich Earth, what do you think of inviting some of them to join this list serve group, assuming Tom Miles is okay with that?  I think we could learn a lot from them and vice versa.  If you’d rather, I’d be happy to reach out to them.  (Many years ago, I used to live a few miles from Brattleboro, Vermont, where they’re headquartered.)

Kim    


On Sep 23, 2020, at 11:06 PM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Kim, the Rich Earth Institute does excellent work with urine.  It held its three-day virtual summit last week, at which I briefly presented on this topic.  The summit was recorded and can be viewed here.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:44 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
All,

Just in case you haven’t heard of them, there is an organization here in the US that promotes the use of human urine in agriculture.  It’s called the Rich Earth Institute and they are headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont (in New England).  If you’re curious, here is their website:  http://richearthinstitute.org/ .  They are trying to develop standards for urine use in agriculture.  I don’t know whether there are similar organizations in other countries.    

Kim Chaffee

http://richearthinstitute.org/ 

On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Thanks, Frank.  We are moving toward this model which allows poor smallholder farmers to collect, charge and store biochar year round:

Put an empty charcoal/rice bag in a hole in the ground.  These inexpensive PP bags are porous.  As the char is made, add it and urine to the bag.  When the bag is full, the char should be charged and excess liquid will have drained away.  Put the bag of biochar out and store it for the planting season.  Put another empty bag in the hole and start the process again.

Most smallholder farmers have little or no manure and don't know how to compost.  We will recommend they add whatever manure they have to the biochar.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 6:33 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Yes Kevin,
your description of reasoning , methodology, time allowed and credible considerations  are all aiming at best practice and superb developments.
If you make the biochar you may like to quench and soak the char in the urine at the earliest (hot, warm, ultra-dry) stage. The follow the process as you outlined.
Have lots of productive fun and please take photos of the effects your Biochar process has on the production in the garden and on the land to share here with the network/ discussion group.
Best regards and thanks for sharing
Frank



From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of jim karnofski
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 6:17 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Kevin,

 

Urine charged biochar:

 

The purpose of using urine-soaked biochar is to recycle nutrients and charge the dry, sterile biochar.

 

First, I mix in active compost with the sterile char so there are hungry microbes lurking when the urine is poured through the mix.

 

Second, the container is large and has small holes in the bottom allowing the excess liquid to slowly drip out the bottom.  You will find contaminated water strained through charcoal comes out mostly pure as the nutrients are stripped from aqueous solution to reside within the biochar.

 

Third, this charged biochar is then mixed into the rough side of my compost pile which helps preserve the detritus from gassing off as it rots while also integrating with the other soil microbes.

 

Fourth, the working raw pile of compost is turned into a finished pile of compost to sit until cool.

 

By the time this material is applied to the garden soil, the microbiology has done its magic. No worries. Aerobic compost has a healthy smell with dominant non-pathogenic bacteria that have their way with the bad bacteria.

 

If plated and isolated very carefully, healthy soil probably contains something of everything in its makeup. Immerse into this biological cloud sans mask and gloves. Eat the occasional raw beet, carrot, or potato fresh from the garden with a patina of dirt. It's all good.

 

Just do it because it is the right thing to do.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 5:09 AM
To: Biochar Listserv <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Does biochar charged with urine need to be stored for a month before application?

 

The WHO recommends that urine to be applied as fertilizer on food crops that are processed should be stored for a month to kill pathogens.  Urine should be stored for six months for crops that are eaten raw.  Is there a similar storage requirement for biochar charged with urine (or manure)?

 

Thank you,

Kevin

 

Kevin McLean, President

Sun24

Tampa, Florida, USA

+1 (813) 505-3340

 

                     








Re: Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine #urine

Kim Chaffee
 

Kevin,

Thanks to you and Frank for your posts.  I saw on Rich Earth's website that they had held a Virtual Summit recently.  Glad you presented, so their audience could learn about biochar.  Their website says that about 120 people from all over the world attend their first online Summit, (which was their 6th Summit overall).  

If you know the people at Rich Earth, what do you think of inviting some of them to join this list serve group, assuming Tom Miles is okay with that?  I think we could learn a lot from them and vice versa.  If you’d rather, I’d be happy to reach out to them.  (Many years ago, I used to live a few miles from Brattleboro, Vermont, where they’re headquartered.)

Kim    


On Sep 23, 2020, at 11:06 PM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Kim, the Rich Earth Institute does excellent work with urine.  It held its three-day virtual summit last week, at which I briefly presented on this topic.  The summit was recorded and can be viewed here.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:44 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
All,

Just in case you haven’t heard of them, there is an organization here in the US that promotes the use of human urine in agriculture.  It’s called the Rich Earth Institute and they are headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont (in New England).  If you’re curious, here is their website:  http://richearthinstitute.org/ .  They are trying to develop standards for urine use in agriculture.  I don’t know whether there are similar organizations in other countries.    

Kim Chaffee

http://richearthinstitute.org/ 

On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Thanks, Frank.  We are moving toward this model which allows poor smallholder farmers to collect, charge and store biochar year round:

Put an empty charcoal/rice bag in a hole in the ground.  These inexpensive PP bags are porous.  As the char is made, add it and urine to the bag.  When the bag is full, the char should be charged and excess liquid will have drained away.  Put the bag of biochar out and store it for the planting season.  Put another empty bag in the hole and start the process again.

Most smallholder farmers have little or no manure and don't know how to compost.  We will recommend they add whatever manure they have to the biochar.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 6:33 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Yes Kevin,
your description of reasoning , methodology, time allowed and credible considerations  are all aiming at best practice and superb developments.
If you make the biochar you may like to quench and soak the char in the urine at the earliest (hot, warm, ultra-dry) stage. The follow the process as you outlined.
Have lots of productive fun and please take photos of the effects your Biochar process has on the production in the garden and on the land to share here with the network/ discussion group.
Best regards and thanks for sharing
Frank



From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of jim karnofski
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 6:17 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Kevin,

 

Urine charged biochar:

 

The purpose of using urine-soaked biochar is to recycle nutrients and charge the dry, sterile biochar.

 

First, I mix in active compost with the sterile char so there are hungry microbes lurking when the urine is poured through the mix.

 

Second, the container is large and has small holes in the bottom allowing the excess liquid to slowly drip out the bottom.  You will find contaminated water strained through charcoal comes out mostly pure as the nutrients are stripped from aqueous solution to reside within the biochar.

 

Third, this charged biochar is then mixed into the rough side of my compost pile which helps preserve the detritus from gassing off as it rots while also integrating with the other soil microbes.

 

Fourth, the working raw pile of compost is turned into a finished pile of compost to sit until cool.

 

By the time this material is applied to the garden soil, the microbiology has done its magic. No worries. Aerobic compost has a healthy smell with dominant non-pathogenic bacteria that have their way with the bad bacteria.

 

If plated and isolated very carefully, healthy soil probably contains something of everything in its makeup. Immerse into this biological cloud sans mask and gloves. Eat the occasional raw beet, carrot, or potato fresh from the garden with a patina of dirt. It's all good.

 

Just do it because it is the right thing to do.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 5:09 AM
To: Biochar Listserv <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Does biochar charged with urine need to be stored for a month before application?

 

The WHO recommends that urine to be applied as fertilizer on food crops that are processed should be stored for a month to kill pathogens.  Urine should be stored for six months for crops that are eaten raw.  Is there a similar storage requirement for biochar charged with urine (or manure)?

 

Thank you,

Kevin

 

Kevin McLean, President

Sun24

Tampa, Florida, USA

+1 (813) 505-3340

 

                     








Re: Dwelling on Drawdown #drawdown

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Kathleen,

Nothing re your question, but a related one: have you found a replacement for cement? I know about using biochar in cement, but the entire process is so energy and carbon intensive (extensive?) that no amount of biochar will offset its foot print. But is there an alternative for slabs, columns, etc. that is routinely available? Where we are, cutting trees is banned and composite wood products are not available.

M




photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:30 PM Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:
Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen


A question about biochar as a decontaminate #contaminate

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

There are lots of articles about the effectiveness of biochar as a heavy metal decontaminate (China/cadmium in rice paddies; Europe/lead at brownfields; US/old mine tailings, mercury). i have three questions: (1) Is it therefore reasonable to suggest the application of biochar soil amendment to urban lawns and playing fields to lock up low level lead contamination? or (2) to suggest the addition of biochar to stormwater drain systems to lock up, for example, low-level lead contamination in drain sediment during the mixing that takes place following a storm? Finally, (3) Is it reasonable to suggest the application of biochar to decontaminate flood mud or areas once covered in flood mud?

I am sure that there are preferred feedstocks, pyrolysis temps, etc. for each contaminate type, but my question is more general. It is really, "Is there any point? Anything to gain?" or would such an exercise be a total waste of money and frivolous?

Michael Shafer


photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand


Re: Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine #urine

Frank Strie
 

Thanks for that interesting link Kim Chaffee,
always more to learn!
I shall check it out and will discuss it with our collaborators / networkers of BIT = Biochar Initiative Tasmania
best regards
Frank

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kim Chaffee
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2020 12:44 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

All,

 

Just in case you haven’t heard of them, there is an organization here in the US that promotes the use of human urine in agriculture.  It’s called the Rich Earth Institute and they are headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont (in New England).  If you’re curious, here is their website:  http://richearthinstitute.org/ .  They are trying to develop standards for urine use in agriculture.  I don’t know whether there are similar organizations in other countries.    

 

Kim Chaffee

 

http://richearthinstitute.org/ 



On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

 

Thanks, Frank.  We are moving toward this model which allows poor smallholder farmers to collect, charge and store biochar year round:

 

Put an empty charcoal/rice bag in a hole in the ground.  These inexpensive PP bags are porous.  As the char is made, add it and urine to the bag.  When the bag is full, the char should be charged and excess liquid will have drained away.  Put the bag of biochar out and store it for the planting season.  Put another empty bag in the hole and start the process again.

 

Most smallholder farmers have little or no manure and don't know how to compost.  We will recommend they add whatever manure they have to the biochar.

 

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 6:33 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Yes Kevin,
your description of reasoning , methodology, time allowed and credible considerations  are all aiming at best practice and superb developments.
If you make the biochar you may like to quench and soak the char in the urine at the earliest (hot, warm, ultra-dry) stage. The follow the process as you outlined.
Have lots of productive fun and please take photos of the effects your Biochar process has on the production in the garden and on the land to share here with the network/ discussion group.
Best regards and thanks for sharing
Frank

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of jim karnofski
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 6:17 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Kevin,

 

Urine charged biochar:

 

The purpose of using urine-soaked biochar is to recycle nutrients and charge the dry, sterile biochar.

 

First, I mix in active compost with the sterile char so there are hungry microbes lurking when the urine is poured through the mix.

 

Second, the container is large and has small holes in the bottom allowing the excess liquid to slowly drip out the bottom.  You will find contaminated water strained through charcoal comes out mostly pure as the nutrients are stripped from aqueous solution to reside within the biochar.

 

Third, this charged biochar is then mixed into the rough side of my compost pile which helps preserve the detritus from gassing off as it rots while also integrating with the other soil microbes.

 

Fourth, the working raw pile of compost is turned into a finished pile of compost to sit until cool.

 

By the time this material is applied to the garden soil, the microbiology has done its magic. No worries. Aerobic compost has a healthy smell with dominant non-pathogenic bacteria that have their way with the bad bacteria.

 

If plated and isolated very carefully, healthy soil probably contains something of everything in its makeup. Immerse into this biological cloud sans mask and gloves. Eat the occasional raw beet, carrot, or potato fresh from the garden with a patina of dirt. It's all good.

 

Just do it because it is the right thing to do.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 5:09 AM
To: Biochar Listserv <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Does biochar charged with urine need to be stored for a month before application?

 

The WHO recommends that urine to be applied as fertilizer on food crops that are processed should be stored for a month to kill pathogens.  Urine should be stored for six months for crops that are eaten raw.  Is there a similar storage requirement for biochar charged with urine (or manure)?

 

Thank you,

Kevin

 

Kevin McLean, President

Sun24

Tampa, Florida, USA

+1 (813) 505-3340

 

                     

 

 

 


Re: Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine #urine

Kevin McLean
 

Kim, the Rich Earth Institute does excellent work with urine.  It held its three-day virtual summit last week, at which I briefly presented on this topic.  The summit was recorded and can be viewed here.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:44 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
All,

Just in case you haven’t heard of them, there is an organization here in the US that promotes the use of human urine in agriculture.  It’s called the Rich Earth Institute and they are headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont (in New England).  If you’re curious, here is their website:  http://richearthinstitute.org/ .  They are trying to develop standards for urine use in agriculture.  I don’t know whether there are similar organizations in other countries.    

Kim Chaffee

http://richearthinstitute.org/ 

On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Thanks, Frank.  We are moving toward this model which allows poor smallholder farmers to collect, charge and store biochar year round:

Put an empty charcoal/rice bag in a hole in the ground.  These inexpensive PP bags are porous.  As the char is made, add it and urine to the bag.  When the bag is full, the char should be charged and excess liquid will have drained away.  Put the bag of biochar out and store it for the planting season.  Put another empty bag in the hole and start the process again.

Most smallholder farmers have little or no manure and don't know how to compost.  We will recommend they add whatever manure they have to the biochar.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 6:33 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Yes Kevin,
your description of reasoning , methodology, time allowed and credible considerations  are all aiming at best practice and superb developments.
If you make the biochar you may like to quench and soak the char in the urine at the earliest (hot, warm, ultra-dry) stage. The follow the process as you outlined.
Have lots of productive fun and please take photos of the effects your Biochar process has on the production in the garden and on the land to share here with the network/ discussion group.
Best regards and thanks for sharing
Frank



From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of jim karnofski
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 6:17 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Kevin,

 

Urine charged biochar:

 

The purpose of using urine-soaked biochar is to recycle nutrients and charge the dry, sterile biochar.

 

First, I mix in active compost with the sterile char so there are hungry microbes lurking when the urine is poured through the mix.

 

Second, the container is large and has small holes in the bottom allowing the excess liquid to slowly drip out the bottom.  You will find contaminated water strained through charcoal comes out mostly pure as the nutrients are stripped from aqueous solution to reside within the biochar.

 

Third, this charged biochar is then mixed into the rough side of my compost pile which helps preserve the detritus from gassing off as it rots while also integrating with the other soil microbes.

 

Fourth, the working raw pile of compost is turned into a finished pile of compost to sit until cool.

 

By the time this material is applied to the garden soil, the microbiology has done its magic. No worries. Aerobic compost has a healthy smell with dominant non-pathogenic bacteria that have their way with the bad bacteria.

 

If plated and isolated very carefully, healthy soil probably contains something of everything in its makeup. Immerse into this biological cloud sans mask and gloves. Eat the occasional raw beet, carrot, or potato fresh from the garden with a patina of dirt. It's all good.

 

Just do it because it is the right thing to do.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 5:09 AM
To: Biochar Listserv <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Does biochar charged with urine need to be stored for a month before application?

 

The WHO recommends that urine to be applied as fertilizer on food crops that are processed should be stored for a month to kill pathogens.  Urine should be stored for six months for crops that are eaten raw.  Is there a similar storage requirement for biochar charged with urine (or manure)?

 

Thank you,

Kevin

 

Kevin McLean, President

Sun24

Tampa, Florida, USA

+1 (813) 505-3340

 

                     





Re: Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine #urine

Kim Chaffee
 

All,

Just in case you haven’t heard of them, there is an organization here in the US that promotes the use of human urine in agriculture.  It’s called the Rich Earth Institute and they are headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont (in New England).  If you’re curious, here is their website:  http://richearthinstitute.org/ .  They are trying to develop standards for urine use in agriculture.  I don’t know whether there are similar organizations in other countries.    

On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:41 AM, Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:

Thanks, Frank.  We are moving toward this model which allows poor smallholder farmers to collect, charge and store biochar year round:

Put an empty charcoal/rice bag in a hole in the ground.  These inexpensive PP bags are porous.  As the char is made, add it and urine to the bag.  When the bag is full, the char should be charged and excess liquid will have drained away.  Put the bag of biochar out and store it for the planting season.  Put another empty bag in the hole and start the process again.

Most smallholder farmers have little or no manure and don't know how to compost.  We will recommend they add whatever manure they have to the biochar.

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 6:33 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Yes Kevin,
your description of reasoning , methodology, time allowed and credible considerations  are all aiming at best practice and superb developments.
If you make the biochar you may like to quench and soak the char in the urine at the earliest (hot, warm, ultra-dry) stage. The follow the process as you outlined.
Have lots of productive fun and please take photos of the effects your Biochar process has on the production in the garden and on the land to share here with the network/ discussion group.
Best regards and thanks for sharing
Frank



From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of jim karnofski
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 6:17 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Kevin,

 

Urine charged biochar:

 

The purpose of using urine-soaked biochar is to recycle nutrients and charge the dry, sterile biochar.

 

First, I mix in active compost with the sterile char so there are hungry microbes lurking when the urine is poured through the mix.

 

Second, the container is large and has small holes in the bottom allowing the excess liquid to slowly drip out the bottom.  You will find contaminated water strained through charcoal comes out mostly pure as the nutrients are stripped from aqueous solution to reside within the biochar.

 

Third, this charged biochar is then mixed into the rough side of my compost pile which helps preserve the detritus from gassing off as it rots while also integrating with the other soil microbes.

 

Fourth, the working raw pile of compost is turned into a finished pile of compost to sit until cool.

 

By the time this material is applied to the garden soil, the microbiology has done its magic. No worries. Aerobic compost has a healthy smell with dominant non-pathogenic bacteria that have their way with the bad bacteria.

 

If plated and isolated very carefully, healthy soil probably contains something of everything in its makeup. Immerse into this biological cloud sans mask and gloves. Eat the occasional raw beet, carrot, or potato fresh from the garden with a patina of dirt. It's all good.

 

Just do it because it is the right thing to do.

 

Jim

 

 

 

 

 


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Kevin McLean <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 5:09 AM
To: Biochar Listserv <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Sterilize Biochar Charged with Urine

 

Does biochar charged with urine need to be stored for a month before application?

 

The WHO recommends that urine to be applied as fertilizer on food crops that are processed should be stored for a month to kill pathogens.  Urine should be stored for six months for crops that are eaten raw.  Is there a similar storage requirement for biochar charged with urine (or manure)?

 

Thank you,

Kevin

 

Kevin McLean, President

Sun24

Tampa, Florida, USA

+1 (813) 505-3340

 

                     





Re: Dwelling on Drawdown #drawdown

Geoff Thomas
 

Fantastic Work Stephen, very interesting project, with creative usage of different ingredients to achieve the whole purpose.
I think it could be a usage of Biochar with world wide importance.

On a side note, you could perhaps inform the property owner, there is a pump made in Australia, an air powered water pump, - initially specially designed for coal mines in the Newcastle area, these pumps are designed to handle all sorts of toxic chemicals, acids, alkalines, grit, sand, etc. and not being a centrifugal pump but a positive displacement pump, are far less liable to slow build-up, seizing, etc.

I came across these air powered pumps whilst designing a new pumping system for Australia’s bushfire fighting fleet, acquired one and have tested it to be sure it can replace the traditional diesel or petrol pumps used on firetrucks, as when a fire overtakes one, it uses the oxygen in the air that the aspirated pumps need so they stop, as does the mist certain or buffer the pump runs, that would otherwise save the lives of the fire fighters, - we lost several crews in the Sutherland Fires  few decades ago, that would have survived with this technology.

I found these pumps extremely robust, powerful, simple to maintain and use, and very suitable for fire truck pumps, as well as many other uses,    - to such a degree I have taken on the Agency for selling them, - only in Far North Queensland, not West Australia, so  here is their website. www.pumps2000.com

Of course they have to be fed compressed air, but the compressor can be a great distance away as resistance to air flowing through a pipe is far less than water, also these pumps continue to function under water, so I imagine would suit the extraction of the salty water from that property, thus prolonging the life of the Charwells?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 24 Sep 2020, at 7:49 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

<Potential of biochar permeable reactive barrier.docx>


Re: Our Dirty Legacy #charcoal

Kevin Chisholm
 

Hi Robert

 

It has been said that “Every Biochar is different”. That would imply that “Biochar X” is beneficial to “Soil condition #1”, while “Biochar Y” would be beneficial to “Soil Condition 2”

 

Is there a way to differentiate the various properties of charcoal, so that they could be categorized as a “Type 1 Biochar”, a “Type 2 biochar”, etc, and then to connect them with “Soil Conditions where they would give the Grower best results”?

 

With such a “Categorization” “charcoal” would not be Biochar” until it was such designated.

Thanks!

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ROBERT W GILLETT
Sent: September 22, 2020 6:11 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Our Dirty Legacy

 

One obstacle to growing the biochar industry is the polluting and ecological damage rightly attributed to charcoal production. Higher standards are not enough by themselves. Monitoring and sanctions are necessary to maintain these standards. A new study using 3-D reflected light microscopy to identify origins of charcoal imported to Europe shows that the charcoal industry still needs to clean up their act. We need not only to differentiate biochar from charcoal, but also to effectuate and maintain an entirely cleaner and more sustainability-conscious culture and image. Biochar companies who merge with or rely on the charcoal industry supply chain should be wary of what they are getting and transparent in their product labeling.

Robert Gillett


Re: Dwelling on Drawdown #drawdown

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Kathleen


Have a look at Karry Fisher watts trench system to stop ingress of salt.  An outline is in the White paper.

Here is a paper .  It has been highly successful.  Their farm is very productive.  Why not put on IBI website.

Regards
Stephen

On Thu, Sep 24, 2020 at 1:30 AM Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:
Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen


World Biogas Summit - no mention of biochar? #ad #bioenergy #conference #manure

Trevor Richards
 

https://world-biogas-summit.com/
This conference looks large, well organised and free this year.
I'm a bit surprised (with all the many biochar-AD papers published) that I can find no mention of biochar in the lineup.
Still too soon?


Re: Dwelling on Drawdown #drawdown

Balz Baur
 

Hello Kathleen

The closest to this application as far as I know, is Embren from Stockholm

regards

Balz

Am 23.09.2020 um 17:24 schrieb Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...>:

Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen <Dwelling on Drawdown - biochar sinks.pptm>


Re: Our Dirty Legacy #charcoal

Frank Strie
 

A very good move Kathleen, thank you.
Cheers
Frank

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathleen Draper
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 2020 1:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Our Dirty Legacy

 

Hello all - 
I asked Harold Bier, Head of Office for the European Biochar Initiative to join this group and respond to this thread to provide context around why this was done. It might take a day or two but I think it is important to understand the rationale here.

Cheers
Kathleen


Re: Our Dirty Legacy #charcoal

Kathleen Draper
 

Hello all - 
I asked Harold Bier, Head of Office for the European Biochar Initiative to join this group and respond to this thread to provide context around why this was done. It might take a day or two but I think it is important to understand the rationale here.

Cheers
Kathleen


Dwelling on Drawdown #drawdown

Kathleen Draper
 

Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen


The Wonders of Wood Vinegar Webinar #woodvinegar #webinar

mikethewormguy
 

Hello All,

Next week I will be participating in a webinar regarding the wonders of wood vinegar.  The webinar is being put on by the Australia/New Zealand Biochar folks (www.anzbig.org)...   I am sure if you contact Don Coyne (execdirect@..., he can provide webinar details.

My contribution will be discussing the practioner work we have been doing with Wood Vinegar, as well as, Walnut Shell Vinegar in combination or seperately for seed, soil, and leaf treatments.

I will be posting our Green Quest website (www.onagreenquest.net), the soil drench recipe that I have used this season for feeding all of our vegetables, as well as, our CBD Hemp planting on ..  Contained in this posting will be details behind the recipe development.

My expectation is that folks use this 'living' recipe and provide feedback to Biochar World.  This current recipe has worked for us but you may need to modify the recipe for it to work for you.  The instructions I am providing can be seen, as a starting point.

This posting will occur next week.   Contact me via email (mikethewormguy@...) if you have questions about the soil drench recipe directions.   I will try to be as clear as possible in my instructions......

Happy Experimenting !

Mike Flynn
Green Quest LLC (www.onagreenquest.net)
BioSpecific LLC (www.biospecific.farm)
" Chance favors the prepared mind"...a.e.


Re: Our Dirty Legacy #charcoal

ROBERT W GILLETT
 

Hi Frank,

To retain the original points I made in our conversation, I reverted to the original topic and copied your most recent response below. 

Thank-you for pointing out the EBC criteria. I found relevant aspects in paragraph 2.4: 

"If the climate neutrality of a forest is not ensured by the official LULUCF reports of the EU member states or by regional legislation, proof can also be provided by Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification. Otherwise, the forest wood is not accepted as biomass input for the production of EBC certified biochar. Accordingly, no EBC C-sink potential of biochar produced from that biomass can be certified."

I heartily endorse this certification and your view on holistic management.

Yet, the reality is, according to the report in Nature that many charcoal suppliers are sourcing feedstock from tropical and sub-tropical forests which makes their sustainability much more suspect and the majority of those in Belgium, Spain, Poland, and Italy do not have a sustainability certification.

While that does not implicate the entire charcoal industry, it is bad PR and biochar producers are probably lumped together in the public mind with this dirty business. Hence, lending even more importance (than simply fitness-for-use) to differentiating biochar from charcoal and having the certification to back up claims of holistic environmental stewardship.

Best, 
Robert




 Frank Strie
Sep 22   

Robert,
It is important to read the material developed by EBC as it puts very clear emphasis on  the chain of custody aspects. Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Certification process and things like Organic Certification etc. may not be perfect in every place and country, as they obviously involve people and industry players of all walks of life and culture, the fact is they are processes that involve communication processes and regular refinement processes  in the social, environmental and commercial aspects. As we deal with local customers of our Biochar products, people can and do come to our property to see how our Biochar works and how we use it. The Equipment we use and the feedstock we use can be traced. Now that we export the equipment around the country we get feedback from these growing number of clients at various scales.
When it comes to wood used in Biochar and Charcoal and Bioenergy production we strongly support and practice the management principles  developed and practiced over 7 decades by ProSilva 
https://www.prosilva.org in by now at least 26 countries so far.
As a ProSilva style Forester myself and long-time Member of the ANW Germany / ProSilva organisation, as a former founding director of FSC Australia,  and ongoing IBI member, I (like to) collaborate with likeminded individuals and groups and companies around the world, rather than to point to shortcomings and mistakes of others, we try to and demonstrate what can be done by systematic and holistic planning and action. The EcoModelRegion Kaindorf in Austria is working on just that agenda how to bring all the stakeholders together and think and practice optimisation for all, from the little children and families, producers, consumers, manufacturers and traders.
You may like to check out this example from the IBI excursion in June 2018:
https://www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/excellent-short-video-about-the-project-in-norway-on-the-excursion-to-austria

In summary,  considering the many pressing issues and emergencies in 2020 and the growing awareness  to develop solutions to climate, soil, carbon actions that stand the test of time, incl. waste upcycling, we (as a network) should focus on whole quality in our actions and discussions.
We need to show our ‘glocal’ communities  and future generations the way forward .
Here a nice way to approach things at every scale:

 

Holistic Decision Making and Policy Development Explained simply in less than 10 minutes!
568 views   •Feb 18, 2020

Be the change you want to see in the world.
Holistic Management: connecting everything because everything is connected.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_EucgpoL5c&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR1N7GtSiIGm_19Dx0wt8XG8tkmYbOhqRF96R32a7WzGvMSd5w9K0TEt1D8


Until next time
Frank


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