Date   

Re: Forest biochar rocket stove #stoves

Kevin McLean
 

It was pointed out that my link to the AgWa was wrong.  Sorry.  Here is the correct link to the AgWa:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vi2DU_dYwMeY8TRHlz72d7Y8BrTb-OjhZGh5Tw7TMZs/edit?usp=sharing

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 2:53 PM K McLean <info@...> wrote:
Thanks, Daniel.  Here is a summary of the rock bed project.  Rock beds are free, simple and cut firewood usage by a third.  Millions of African families are using rock beds in their three stone cookstoves.

We've also designed a $2 TLUD called the Agwa.  It burns agricultural waste and makes biochar.

Kevin

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 9:34 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n=yahoo.fr@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


Cornell Cooperative extension: Biochar Webinar Series Nov 10-19 #webinar

Tom Miles
 

 

Host organization: Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County

Contact info: Deborah Aller: da352@...

Mina Vescera: 631-603-9613 • mv365@...

Dates and times: Tuesday, November 10th: Biochar Basics Overview, 12:00 – 2:30 PM (EST)

Thursday, November 12th: Science Behind Biochar, 5:00 – 7:30 PM (EST)

Tuesday, November 17th: Nursery Applications of Biochar, 12:00 – 2:30 PM (EST)

Thursday, November 19th: Landscape Applications of Biochar, 5:00 – 7:30 PM (EST)

Fee: Free but registration is required.

This is a virtual workshop offered through Zoom.

 

This biochar webinar series will provide an introduction to biochar and review some cur- rent advances in biochar science, with subsequent discussion of nursery and landscape research and applications.

Tuesday, November 10th: Biochar Basics Overview, 12:00 – 2:30 PM (EST)

Registration link: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8gZuMtDdR1GAbPjwvouiEQ

 

Biochar: an introduction to a sustainable soil amendment

Deborah Aller, PhD, Agricultural Stewardship Specialist, CCE - Suffolk

 

USBI: Introduction to the biochar community

Tom Miles, Executive Director - USBI (United States Biochar Initiative)

 

Biochar for climate mitigation: withdrawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sequestering it in soil

Johannes Lehmann, PhD, Professor - Cornell University

 

Thursday, November 12th: Science Behind Biochar, 5:00 – 7:30 PM (EST)

Registration link: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_n9SKPbxzT8iJHi6y2F8xqw

 

Properties of biochar and torrefied biomass: the science in the analytical black box

Jillian Goldfarb, PhD, Assistant Professor - Cornell University

 

Advances in biochar production

Bernardo Del Campo, PhD, President - ARTi (Advanced Renewable Technology International)

 

Valorization of biochar: Applications in nutrient recycling from animal manure

Chumki Banik, PhD, Research Associate - Iowa State University


Tuesday, November 17th: Ornamental Nursery Applications of Biochar, 12:00 – 2:30 PM (EST)

Registration link: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_4i1atbu3T-aha9QnzgjgkQ

 

Biochar as a substrate in container production

Neil Mattson, PhD, Associate Professor - Cornell University

 

Biochar nursery trials in Long Island container and field production

Deborah Aller, PhD, Agricultural Stewardship Specialist, & Mina Vescera, Nursery/Landscape Specialist, CCE-Suffolk

 

Biochar as a soil amendment for blueberry production

Bryan Sales, PhD, Assistant Professor - University of North Carolina at Pembroke

 

Thursday, November 19th: Landscape Applications of Biochar, 5:00 – 7:30 PM (EST)

Registration link: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Phk2l7tVT6-PDsXowW8WFQ

 

Biochar and biosolids increase tree growth and improve soil quality for urban landscapes

Bryant Scharenbroch, PhD Assistant Professor - University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

 

Biochar as a soil amendment to improve tree survival and health in the urban environment

Emma Schaffert, The F. A. Bartlett Tree Experts, North Carolina

 

Field and landscape applications of biochar using a variety of methods

Andrew Borner, Owner of Natural Plant Solutions - Shaw Island, WA

 

 

 

Tom Miles

Executive Director

U.S. Biochar Initiative

"Promoting the Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar"

www.biochar-us.org

@USbiochar

Facebook US Biochar Initiative

USBI Logo - Copy (420x176) 

 

 


Re: #filtration #water #filtration #water

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Robert

We did a lot of work with a company that makes wet land sewage systems and  reactive barriers.  Here are the results of our work.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Oct 23, 2020 at 2:44 AM Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am applying for a grant to construct filters for stormwater management in environmentally sensitive locations. 

According to published studies, effective water filters can be made with biochar and various elements. For example, certain biochars have been demonstrated to filter phosphorous effectively (for one example) using a lanthanum zeolite compound in connections with specific feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, etc. - 

Is there a business (or research facility?) already in existence that can make filtration compounds to match the specifications of a scientific study and produce them at a reasonable price, in a real-world volume?  

If not, might this represent a good business opportunity?


Re: Forest biochar rocket stove #stoves

Kevin McLean
 

Thanks, Daniel.  Here is a summary of the rock bed project.  Rock beds are free, simple and cut firewood usage by a third.  Millions of African families are using rock beds in their three stone cookstoves.

We've also designed a $2 TLUD called the Agwa.  It burns agricultural waste and makes biochar.

Kevin

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 9:34 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n=yahoo.fr@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


Re: #filtration #water #filtration #water

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Another info (Attached).

Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher

Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Office 47

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 8:28 PM CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL via groups.io <paulcs2017=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello Robert,
I think there is nothing applying this idea to the industry. Filteration of phosphorous through biochar is new to me. This will be a very nice start up idea. I attached an article about the topic. Also, you can see the link - https://www.soilfixer.co.uk/Biochar-for-Water-and-Gas-Filtration


Thanking you,
Paul

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 5:44 PM Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am applying for a grant to construct filters for stormwater management in environmentally sensitive locations. 

According to published studies, effective water filters can be made with biochar and various elements. For example, certain biochars have been demonstrated to filter phosphorous effectively (for one example) using a lanthanum zeolite compound in connections with specific feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, etc. - 

Is there a business (or research facility?) already in existence that can make filtration compounds to match the specifications of a scientific study and produce them at a reasonable price, in a real-world volume?  

If not, might this represent a good business opportunity?


Re: NYTimes.com: Belching Cows and Endless Feedlots: Fixing Cattle’s Climate Issues #feed #methane

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Hello Kim,
It's a nice opportunity in the field of biochar. We found in research that sewage sludge biochar producing in pyrolysis temperature 320 ℃ is the highest container of available phosphorus. But the C-N ratio was higher in high-temperature biochar (520 and 620 ℃).

Thanking You,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher

Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Office 47

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 5:05 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
All,
Beef production using feedlots is growing fastest in developing countries.  Research in the US is ongoing on how to fix the CH4 and N2O emissions.  Sounds like an opportunity for biochar.
Kim

From The New York Times:

Belching Cows and Endless Feedlots: Fixing Cattle’s Climate Issues

The United States is home to 95 million cattle, and changing what they eat could have a significant effect on emissions of greenhouse gases like methane that are warming the world.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/21/climate/beef-cattle-methane.html?smid=em-share






Re: #filtration #water #filtration #water

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Hello Robert,
I think there is nothing applying this idea to the industry. Filteration of phosphorous through biochar is new to me. This will be a very nice start up idea. I attached an article about the topic. Also, you can see the link - https://www.soilfixer.co.uk/Biochar-for-Water-and-Gas-Filtration


Thanking you,
Paul

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 5:44 PM Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
I am applying for a grant to construct filters for stormwater management in environmentally sensitive locations. 

According to published studies, effective water filters can be made with biochar and various elements. For example, certain biochars have been demonstrated to filter phosphorous effectively (for one example) using a lanthanum zeolite compound in connections with specific feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, etc. - 

Is there a business (or research facility?) already in existence that can make filtration compounds to match the specifications of a scientific study and produce them at a reasonable price, in a real-world volume?  

If not, might this represent a good business opportunity?


#filtration #water #filtration #water

Robert Lehmert
 

I am applying for a grant to construct filters for stormwater management in environmentally sensitive locations. 

According to published studies, effective water filters can be made with biochar and various elements. For example, certain biochars have been demonstrated to filter phosphorous effectively (for one example) using a lanthanum zeolite compound in connections with specific feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, etc. - 

Is there a business (or research facility?) already in existence that can make filtration compounds to match the specifications of a scientific study and produce them at a reasonable price, in a real-world volume?  

If not, might this represent a good business opportunity?


NYTimes.com: Belching Cows and Endless Feedlots: Fixing Cattle’s Climate Issues #feed #methane

Kim Chaffee
 

All,
Beef production using feedlots is growing fastest in developing countries. Research in the US is ongoing on how to fix the CH4 and N2O emissions. Sounds like an opportunity for biochar.
Kim

From The New York Times:

Belching Cows and Endless Feedlots: Fixing Cattle’s Climate Issues

The United States is home to 95 million cattle, and changing what they eat could have a significant effect on emissions of greenhouse gases like methane that are warming the world.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/21/climate/beef-cattle-methane.html?smid=em-share


Re: New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr #irrigation #water

Rick Wilson
 

Group, I view one of the great values of biochar is that it facilitates the leaching of sodium salts from sodic soils (which contain clay).  

Sodic soils are those where the clay structure has been degraded from sodium salt. 
Sodium (+1) kicks out Magnesium (+2) and Calcium (+2), which causes the air filled porosity of the soil to degrade, making it hard for the microbes to respire. 

Please see the attached Ph.D. thesis from UC Riverside explaining these results. 
Biochar accelerates sodium leaching. Biochar works best in this role when it is accompanied by compost. 
What is interesting is that it is microbiome from the compost that is given credit for much of the benefit.  Sterilize the soil and the benefits diminish. 

I've leached sodic clay soils with this combination of biochar and compost.  Many times. 

Rick Wilson



On Oct 21, 2020, at 9:01 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Paul and: list

Thanks for the added paper.

I see the clay in this study is nearly 2/3 clay, 1/3 sand - well above all the other studies in the new paper being discussed.   This paper should be a help to those having a clay soil.  And to all selling char.

Ron



On Oct 21, 2020, at 9:22 AM, CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL <paulcs2017@...> wrote:

Dear Ron,
As you know clay soil generally retains a high amount of water in comparison to sandy soil. The addition of biochar to the clay soil increases the pores in soil particles. In my point of view, the biochar addition will increase water retention more in clay soil but definitely, it will depend on the biochar feedstocks and pyrolysis temperature. You can go through a research article (attached).

Thanking you,
Paul

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 1:21 AM Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:
List:  cc the two corresponding authors in case they have more to add.   (And thanks to the  person supplying this lead, preferring to stay anonymous)

This is a valuable new non-fee biochar paper re water savings:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12765
(With considerable good data in the Supplemental - reachable from here also. - no separate ID)

        There is a plug for it also at:    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-biochar-money.html
One sentence there (emphasis added) indicates the paper’s  importance:    "The study co-led by Rice biogeochemist Caroline Masiello and economist Kenneth Medlock provides formulas to help farmers estimate irrigation cost savings from increased water-holding capacity (WHC) with biochar amendment.
[RWL:  The formulas are easy enough)

Maybe others on this list can add to the number of papers they could use - now mostly in the sandy corner of their soil triangle.  They couldn’t use some other potentially useful water saving papers because those didn’t provide all the possibly important explanatory variables.

Below is one view of the data set they used (lots more numbers in the Supplemental).   Anyone able to add points in the clay area?   The authors state that biochar is known to work well there also - but no data yet.   

Ron

<Screen Shot 2020-10-20 at 4.46.08 PM.png>


<Rasa-2018-How-and-why-does-willow-biochar-inc.pdf>



Re: New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr #irrigation #water

Ron Larson
 

Paul and: list

Thanks for the added paper.

I see the clay in this study is nearly 2/3 clay, 1/3 sand - well above all the other studies in the new paper being discussed.   This paper should be a help to those having a clay soil.  And to all selling char.

Ron



On Oct 21, 2020, at 9:22 AM, CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL <paulcs2017@...> wrote:

Dear Ron,
As you know clay soil generally retains a high amount of water in comparison to sandy soil. The addition of biochar to the clay soil increases the pores in soil particles. In my point of view, the biochar addition will increase water retention more in clay soil but definitely, it will depend on the biochar feedstocks and pyrolysis temperature. You can go through a research article (attached).

Thanking you,
Paul

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 1:21 AM Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:
List:  cc the two corresponding authors in case they have more to add.   (And thanks to the  person supplying this lead, preferring to stay anonymous)

This is a valuable new non-fee biochar paper re water savings:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12765
(With considerable good data in the Supplemental - reachable from here also. - no separate ID)

        There is a plug for it also at:    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-biochar-money.html
One sentence there (emphasis added) indicates the paper’s  importance:    "The study co-led by Rice biogeochemist Caroline Masiello and economist Kenneth Medlock provides formulas to help farmers estimate irrigation cost savings from increased water-holding capacity (WHC) with biochar amendment.
[RWL:  The formulas are easy enough)

Maybe others on this list can add to the number of papers they could use - now mostly in the sandy corner of their soil triangle.  They couldn’t use some other potentially useful water saving papers because those didn’t provide all the possibly important explanatory variables.

Below is one view of the data set they used (lots more numbers in the Supplemental).   Anyone able to add points in the clay area?   The authors state that biochar is known to work well there also - but no data yet.   

Ron

<Screen Shot 2020-10-20 at 4.46.08 PM.png>


<Rasa-2018-How-and-why-does-willow-biochar-inc.pdf>


Re: Forest biochar rocket stove #stoves

Daniel Pidgeon
 

Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


Re: New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr #irrigation #water

David Yarrow
 

biochar and clay have distinctly different water hold strategies.

my impression from field observations is that they complement and need each other.  the idea they compete is an error of insight; they form a partnership that can boost water retention beyond either alone.

biochar retains water in its micropore sponge structure, sucking water in largely thru simple capillary action.  biochar's electric charge sites on its surfaces enhance this capillary action by increasing the forces that pull water inwards, and then hang onto it once inside, but loosely.  

biochar has far fewer electric charges on its surfaces than clay, and thus, the water is not so tightly held.  thus, biochar rather rapidly dries out once exposed to atmosphere or heated.  a pile of biochar will develop a thin dry surface layer, while remaining moist inside.  and being black, char exposed to sunshine & atmosphere will heat up and dry out even faster.

however, biochar inside soil, in full contact with soil particles, will safely retain the water it absorbs into its hollow sponge spaces.

clay forms much more intimate bonds with water molecules.  its thick abundance of negative charge sites grab and hold those water molecules more tenaciously, and assembles water into clay-water complexes – hydrates.  thus, clay will stay wet longer than biochar.  however, clay also absorbs and retains water much more slowly, and clay is slower to allow water to pass thru and percolate deeper into it. 

on the other side, clay resist water absorption, in part because it is so fine, with tightly stacked & packed microplates, and narrow spaces in between.  further, as clay absorbs water and forms its hydrate complexes, it swells up, further reducing those spaces between its tiny particles.  so clay tends to shed water after its surface layer gets wet, and water is slow to penetrate deeply.  fortunately, as clay dries out , it shrinks and opens large cracks that will allow water to rush in deeper.

my impression is if biochar – or many other ultrafine carbon, like humic & fulvic acid – is added to clay, the carbon swarms & surrounds clay's strong electric charges, to isolate & insulate them, reducing their polar attractions and reducing stickiness.  this allows the mass of clay to relax and become more open.  this happens, too, in a different way, with larger pieces of biochar, further loosening, relaxing and opening the clay.  this means water can into penetrate into clay easier, faster, deeper.  so, while biochar slows water movement thru sand, biochar increases water movement thru & into clay.

so, what i like to do it blend biochar and clay together.  usually this means adding fine clay powder to biochar, so the grains of biochar are coated by the dust, and deployed into soil already in an intimate association, ready to work together to manage water and nutrients.  the biochar & clay don't just fall together, they become organized into complex structures that seem to serve functional purposes.  likely stephen joseph et al have research and microscopic views that reveal this structured partnership.

below is my slide for talking about water & biochar:


for a green & peaceful planet,
david yarrow


On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 12:46 PM Charles Hegberg <chegberg@...> wrote:

Based on some other research, biochar really can’t compete with clay for WHC.  So minimal impact.  However, I agree with biochar depending on particle sizes used to act as more of an aggregate (course sand to gravel) in the clay to increase macropore development. The biggest down side is you need a lot of biochar to begin to change the soil structure in a primarily clay soil.  Could consider a blending of course sand and biochar.  Soils in the top half of the pyramid are classified as Hydrologic Soil Group  (HSG) D which are often found along streams, rivers, floodplains, and wetlands so from an environmental standpoint shouldn’t be impacted anyway. 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 11:22 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr

 

Dear Ron,

As you know clay soil generally retains a high amount of water in comparison to sandy soil. The addition of biochar to the clay soil increases the pores in soil particles. In my point of view, the biochar addition will increase water retention more in clay soil but definitely, it will depend on the biochar feedstocks and pyrolysis temperature. You can go through a research article (attached).

 

Thanking you,

Paul

 

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 1:21 AM Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

List:  cc the two corresponding authors in case they have more to add.   (And thanks to the  person supplying this lead, preferring to stay anonymous)

 

This is a valuable new non-fee biochar paper re water savings:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12765

(With considerable good data in the Supplemental - reachable from here also. - no separate ID)

 

        There is a plug for it also at:    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-biochar-money.html

One sentence there (emphasis added) indicates the paper’s  importance:    "The study co-led by Rice biogeochemist Caroline Masiello and economist Kenneth Medlock provides formulas to help farmers estimate irrigation cost savings from increased water-holding capacity (WHC) with biochar amendment.

[RWL:  The formulas are easy enough)

 

Maybe others on this list can add to the number of papers they could use - now mostly in the sandy corner of their soil triangle.  They couldn’t use some other potentially useful water saving papers because those didn’t provide all the possibly important explanatory variables.

 

Below is one view of the data set they used (lots more numbers in the Supplemental).   Anyone able to add points in the clay area?   The authors state that biochar is known to work well there also - but no data yet.   

 

Ron

 


Re: New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr #irrigation #water

Charles Hegberg
 

Based on some other research, biochar really can’t compete with clay for WHC.  So minimal impact.  However, I agree with biochar depending on particle sizes used to act as more of an aggregate (course sand to gravel) in the clay to increase macropore development. The biggest down side is you need a lot of biochar to begin to change the soil structure in a primarily clay soil.  Could consider a blending of course sand and biochar.  Soils in the top half of the pyramid are classified as Hydrologic Soil Group  (HSG) D which are often found along streams, rivers, floodplains, and wetlands so from an environmental standpoint shouldn’t be impacted anyway. 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
Sent: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 11:22 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr

 

Dear Ron,

As you know clay soil generally retains a high amount of water in comparison to sandy soil. The addition of biochar to the clay soil increases the pores in soil particles. In my point of view, the biochar addition will increase water retention more in clay soil but definitely, it will depend on the biochar feedstocks and pyrolysis temperature. You can go through a research article (attached).

 

Thanking you,

Paul

 

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 1:21 AM Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

List:  cc the two corresponding authors in case they have more to add.   (And thanks to the  person supplying this lead, preferring to stay anonymous)

 

This is a valuable new non-fee biochar paper re water savings:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12765

(With considerable good data in the Supplemental - reachable from here also. - no separate ID)

 

        There is a plug for it also at:    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-biochar-money.html

One sentence there (emphasis added) indicates the paper’s  importance:    "The study co-led by Rice biogeochemist Caroline Masiello and economist Kenneth Medlock provides formulas to help farmers estimate irrigation cost savings from increased water-holding capacity (WHC) with biochar amendment.

[RWL:  The formulas are easy enough)

 

Maybe others on this list can add to the number of papers they could use - now mostly in the sandy corner of their soil triangle.  They couldn’t use some other potentially useful water saving papers because those didn’t provide all the possibly important explanatory variables.

 

Below is one view of the data set they used (lots more numbers in the Supplemental).   Anyone able to add points in the clay area?   The authors state that biochar is known to work well there also - but no data yet.   

 

Ron

 


Re: New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr #irrigation #water

CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Dear Ron,
As you know clay soil generally retains a high amount of water in comparison to sandy soil. The addition of biochar to the clay soil increases the pores in soil particles. In my point of view, the biochar addition will increase water retention more in clay soil but definitely, it will depend on the biochar feedstocks and pyrolysis temperature. You can go through a research article (attached).

Thanking you,
Paul

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 1:21 AM Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:
List:  cc the two corresponding authors in case they have more to add.   (And thanks to the  person supplying this lead, preferring to stay anonymous)

This is a valuable new non-fee biochar paper re water savings:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12765
(With considerable good data in the Supplemental - reachable from here also. - no separate ID)

        There is a plug for it also at:    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-biochar-money.html
One sentence there (emphasis added) indicates the paper’s  importance:    "The study co-led by Rice biogeochemist Caroline Masiello and economist Kenneth Medlock provides formulas to help farmers estimate irrigation cost savings from increased water-holding capacity (WHC) with biochar amendment.
[RWL:  The formulas are easy enough)

Maybe others on this list can add to the number of papers they could use - now mostly in the sandy corner of their soil triangle.  They couldn’t use some other potentially useful water saving papers because those didn’t provide all the possibly important explanatory variables.

Below is one view of the data set they used (lots more numbers in the Supplemental).   Anyone able to add points in the clay area?   The authors state that biochar is known to work well there also - but no data yet.   

Ron


New paper on water saving benefits of biochsr #irrigation #water

Ron Larson
 

List:  cc the two corresponding authors in case they have more to add.   (And thanks to the  person supplying this lead, preferring to stay anonymous)

This is a valuable new non-fee biochar paper re water savings:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcbb.12765
(With considerable good data in the Supplemental - reachable from here also. - no separate ID)

        There is a plug for it also at:    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-biochar-money.html
One sentence there (emphasis added) indicates the paper’s  importance:    "The study co-led by Rice biogeochemist Caroline Masiello and economist Kenneth Medlock provides formulas to help farmers estimate irrigation cost savings from increased water-holding capacity (WHC) with biochar amendment.
[RWL:  The formulas are easy enough)

Maybe others on this list can add to the number of papers they could use - now mostly in the sandy corner of their soil triangle.  They couldn’t use some other potentially useful water saving papers because those didn’t provide all the possibly important explanatory variables.

Below is one view of the data set they used (lots more numbers in the Supplemental).   Anyone able to add points in the clay area?   The authors state that biochar is known to work well there also - but no data yet.   

Ron


Press release: 2021 Funding Opportunities for "Wood Innovations" and "Community Wood Energy and Wood Innovation" grant programs #woodinnovationgrant #usfs

Tom Miles
 

From: Tucker, Julie -FS <julie.tucker@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 8:45 AM

As we celebrate National Forest Products Week, please see today’s press release announcing funding opportunities for our two grant programs:

 

  • 2021 Wood Innovations grants
  • 2021 Community Wood Energy and Wood Innovation grants

 

https://www.fs.usda.gov/news/releases/usda-forest-service-now-accepting-applications-grant-programs-supporting-innovation

 

November 3rd 2020 date the USFS will have a webinar Tuesday, November 10, 2020 at 2:00 pm EST, for additional information and outreach on the topic.

 

Please spread the word….

 

Cheers,

Julie

 

 

Renewable wood energy…..promoting sustainable forest management one community at a time.

 

Forest Service Shield

Julie Tucker 
National Lead for Renewable Wood Energy

U.S. Forest Service

State & Private Forestry

phone: 202-253-6483
Julie.Tucker@...

1400 Independence Avenue SW

Mailstop: 1123
Washington, DC 20250-1123
www.fs.fed.us 
  

Caring for the land and serving people


Re: Biochar helps hold water, saves money: New Rice University Study #water #irrigation

mikethewormguy
 

Kim,

The devil is in the details....  Am curious about the supporting info for their conclusions.

Mike


Re: Municipal sewer solids to biochar #biosolids

Helmut Gerber
 

Hello,
at sufficiently severe pyrolysis conditions (> 500°C) and residence times (> 3 min), all
reference organic contaminants and organic micropollutants are completely or nearly
completely degraded or driven off the solid material.
( Literature review attached)

Best regards

Helmut Gerber


________________________________________

 

Dipl.- Ing. HELMUT GERBER

Geschäftsführer / Managing Director

European Biochar Industry Consortium (EBI) Member of the Board

 

PYREG GmbH - Trinkbornstraße 15-17 - 56281 Dörth 

Tel:        +49 6747 95388 14

Fax:       +49 6747 95388 19

E-mail:   h.gerber@...

www.pyreg.de

 

Registergericht: Koblenz, HRB 22135, USt-ID.Nr. DE 263792157.

Geschäftsführung: Helmut Gerber, Jörg zu Dohna

 

 

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P  Save a tree. Don't print this e-mail unless it's necessary.




Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> im Auftrag von Eli Fishpaw via groups.io <belifishpaw@...>
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 15. Oktober 2020 14:37
An: tutaonana@... <tutaonana@...>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Betreff: Re: [Biochar] Municipal sewer solids to biochar
 
Would fecal char be safe for use as biochar?  I know our current challenge for use of sludge in agriculture is pollution such as anti-biotics in material.  Would the heat of pyrolysis destroy those threats?  Otherwise, it is a feedstock that forms to the size of the retort, unlike wood that must be cut into small pieces.  
 
Eli 
 



----- Original Message -----
From: Ingelore Kahrens [mailto:tutaonana@...]
To: <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Thu, 15 Oct 2020 00:04:16 +0200
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Municipal sewer solids to biochar

This is how they do it in Kenya. https://www.treehugger.com/kenya-fecal-briquettes-are-serving-clean-cooking-fuel-4857062

Cheers,

Ingelore Kahrens

 

Am 13.10.2020 um 16:17 schrieb bajarobl:
Interesting article:
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-12/logan-city-aims-to-use-poo-power-human-waste-to-energy/12748782
Dewetting sewer solids will take a lot of energy, but carbonizing degrades plastics and pharmaceutical, the bugaboos of sewer waste recovery efforts. 


Fabstove RE: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove #rocketstove #stoves #technology

Paul S Anderson
 

Nicolas,

 

Here is some minimal information about the FabStove.   It is made in  South Africa, but can have assembly and even partial fabrication  in the county (or region) of a project involving hundreds of stoves.  

 

It is for biomass pellet fuel, so a supply of pellet fuel is a pre-requisite.   If you have pellets, this is the best biomass stove available.

 

It has a small fan in  the base that uses very little electric power from the  grid or a battery (5v) or solar when the sun is shining.

 

Price per stove can  vary because of optional features and alternative structures and any importation expenses, basic .    It is to be considered an advanced stove, not an ICS improved cookstove.  

 

Yes, it produces biochar.    It is expected to  be available in the  USA / Canada later this year, but it is not yet advertized.

 

I helped design this stove.  Feel free to ask me any questions and  I can put serious project proposers in contact with the company..

 

 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of detiffe nicolas via groups.io
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 8:44 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io; main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?


I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

 

Saludos 

 

Nicolas 

 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :

 

 

Hi Nicolas,

 

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

 

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

 

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

 

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

 

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

 

Thinking on the run...

 

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

 

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

 

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 

 

20170518 120101

 

 

 

However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.

They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

 

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.

The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.

I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 

 

 

 

 

Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

 

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 

 

 

ביו-צ'אר רוקט סטוב.avi

 

 

It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

 

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

 

In summary:

 

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

 

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)

Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

 

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?

 

 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :

 

 

Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>





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