Date   

Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Paul S Anderson
 

Don, Paul Taylor, Stephen,

 

Please send me a link to information  and photos about

 

“…Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective…”

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 5:29 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Don Coyne
 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Re: Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Dick Gallien
 

Hi Norm,
I have four 3 pt. tractors at the moment and went out with the tape measure--it isn't practical, if not dangerous.  Spread, the 2 lower arms are 28" apart---13" from each rear tractor tire; however,  the 14" of the kon tiki would be inches from the hydraulic hook ups and so close to rear fuel tanks.  Now the 8N Ford that I've had for 64 yrs., has no hydraulic hook ups and the gas tank is above the engine, for gravity feed.  Was your plan to hook it up to the pto, so as to spread it, once quenched?  The Tassy Trailer system seems safer and more practical.  Good luck
Dick Gallien  
22501 East Burns Valley Road
Winona  MN  55987
dickgallien@...  [507] 312 0194
www.thefarm.winona-mn.us

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures, questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education, while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose of their confinement, it is too late.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Sat, Dec 5, 2020 at 11:52 PM Norm Baker <ntbakerphd@...> wrote:
Thank you, Ingelore. I knew about that one and it is a good unit but not the farmer who made his own owered Kon-Tiki. If I could only remember!?!

Norm


Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Geoff Thomas
 

Good on you Frank, I support your position to produce and supply real Biochar that will enrich the soil and produce higher growth rates, and hopefully heal the soil as appropriate.
Cheers, 
 Geoff.

On 6 Dec 2020, at 7:37 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Norm and Ingelore,
Thanks for your inquiry and for recognising our KON-TIKI-TAS Shuttle,  a road registered  trailer mounted 1m3  deep cone kin and this was designed and built and is operated in Tasmania / Australia.
The purpose is to be able to take the kiln to the feedstock / to the biomass  and be able to have a multi- purpose material transporter. 
The process of carbonising biomass to become biochar is just the 1st step in the production process. 
Because it is essential to charge the fresh char with nutrients to become good quality, life supporting Biochar I thought about it in July 2014 when we designed the first KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kiln to be able to “flood quench” our kilns not only with water, but with a liquid manure slurry instead as the 2. Step.
The 3rd step is crushing / hammer milling the fresh coarse, nutrient enriched char to be optimised for large surface and 
the 4th step to cure & mature like a good compost or a good cider fermentation with time, say about 6 weeks plus.

I can see no advantage to create lots of clean fresh char to be surface applied through a fertiliser spreader. It would result in a growth preventing / retarding surface coating, more like a non-toxic herbicide, until over time this char is loaded with nutrients again over time. 
Feel free to explore our website 
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au , but also the fantastically valuable article about ‘How Biochar Works in Soil’ written by Kelpie Wilson some 6 years ago:   https://www.biochar-journal.org/itjo/media/doc/1414798880420.pdf 

Best regards from under Down Under
Frank again


 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Norm Baker
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 4:52 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.
 
Thank you, Ingelore. I knew about that one and it is a good unit but not the farmer who made his own owered Kon-Tiki. If I could only remember!?!
 
Norm



Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

Frank Strie
 

Spot on Michael Shafer, the process is progressing by the day!

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 3:33 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate

 

Cool.

 

Re the previous,. Although not formally documented as the EU use of biochar in animal feed is, our farmers from many separate and unconnected locations in E Africa report that the addition of small amounts of biochar to feed reduces the incidence of illness, cost of vet care and meds, improves the quality of manure, and reduces smell and flies.

 

I strongly recommend the recent review article on the subject of biochar in animal feeds by Schmidt, Draper, et al., and the series of articles that has appeared in Iktaka in the past year or two on biochar in feed for various types of animals.

 

M

 

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020, 11:41 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Michael,

 

Synergies are good.  Keep in mind that the fresh herbs, like thyme, could be as effective as thyme oil.  It would take some experimenting. You could also look at indigenous herbs that have similar chemistries as these culinary herbs.

 

my 2 cents,

 

Mike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 


Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Frank Strie
 

Hello Norm and Ingelore,
Thanks for your inquiry and for recognising our KON-TIKI-TAS Shuttle,  a road registered  trailer mounted 1m3  deep cone kin and this was designed and built and is operated in Tasmania / Australia.
The purpose is to be able to take the kiln to the feedstock / to the biomass  and be able to have a multi- purpose material transporter.
The process of carbonising biomass to become biochar is just the 1st step in the production process.
Because it is essential to charge the fresh char with nutrients to become good quality, life supporting Biochar I thought about it in July 2014 when we designed the first KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kiln to be able to “flood quench” our kilns not only with water, but with a liquid manure slurry instead as the 2. Step.
The 3rd step is crushing / hammer milling the fresh coarse, nutrient enriched char to be optimised for large surface and
the 4th step to cure & mature like a good compost or a good cider fermentation with time, say about 6 weeks plus.

I can see no advantage to create lots of clean fresh char to be surface applied through a fertiliser spreader. It would result in a growth preventing / retarding surface coating, more like a non-toxic herbicide, until over time this char is loaded with nutrients again over time.
Feel free to explore our website
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au , but also the fantastically valuable article about ‘How Biochar Works in Soil’ written by Kelpie Wilson some 6 years ago:   https://www.biochar-journal.org/itjo/media/doc/1414798880420.pdf

Best regards from under Down Under
Frank again


 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Norm Baker
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 4:52 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Thank you, Ingelore. I knew about that one and it is a good unit but not the farmer who made his own owered Kon-Tiki. If I could only remember!?!

 

Norm


Re: Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Norm Baker
 

Thank you, Ingelore. I knew about that one and it is a good unit but not the farmer who made his own owered Kon-Tiki. If I could only remember!?!

Norm


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Cool.

Re the previous,. Although not formally documented as the EU use of biochar in animal feed is, our farmers from many separate and unconnected locations in E Africa report that the addition of small amounts of biochar to feed reduces the incidence of illness, cost of vet care and meds, improves the quality of manure, and reduces smell and flies.

I strongly recommend the recent review article on the subject of biochar in animal feeds by Schmidt, Draper, et al., and the series of articles that has appeared in Iktaka in the past year or two on biochar in feed for various types of animals.

M


On Fri, Dec 4, 2020, 11:41 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Michael,

Synergies are good.  Keep in mind that the fresh herbs, like thyme, could be as effective as thyme oil.  It would take some experimenting. You could also look at indigenous herbs that have similar chemistries as these culinary herbs.

my 2 cents,

Mike







Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Ingelore Kahrens
 

Is this what you have in mind? By Frank Strie in Tasmania  https://www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products/kon-tiki-tas-deep-cone-kilns/kon-tiki-tas-standard-the-shuttle/

Am 04.12.2020 um 19:07 schrieb Norm Baker:

Guys;

Does anyone have the information, a news article as I recall about a German farmer who built a Kon-Tiki kiln, and mounted it to a three point hitch on his tractor and connected the PTO drive to the spreader mechanism? As I recall, after pyrolysis, quenching and loading, he drove the tractor through his crop fields where the biochar was needed.

Does anyone have any further information or the original bit of news?

Norm


Re: Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Norm Baker
 

Guys;

Does anyone have the information, a news article as I recall about a German farmer who built a Kon-Tiki kiln, and mounted it to a three point hitch on his tractor and connected the PTO drive to the spreader mechanism? As I recall, after pyrolysis, quenching and loading, he drove the tractor through his crop fields where the biochar was needed.

Does anyone have any further information or the original bit of news?

Norm


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

mikethewormguy
 

Michael,

Synergies are good.  Keep in mind that the fresh herbs, like thyme, could be as effective as thyme oil.  It would take some experimenting. You could also look at indigenous herbs that have similar chemistries as these culinary herbs.

my 2 cents,

Mike







Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Love synergies. This is stuff that i can use, even where there are no feed lots.

M


photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
Social icon Social icon Social icon

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 10:32 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Michael,

Doing a quick look at methane production disruptors in cows that are in the commerce space we have... 

Red algae
Garlic
Essential oils
Yeast

Currently, we use garlic, essential oils, and yeast for soil&plant health, as well as, brown algae which contains the same bromoform active, as red algae. 

So depending on the livestock operation, layering multiple partial solutions, that also can be used for soil&plant health, could be as effective, as finding the single use magic bullet, for livestock and earth health, as well as, human health.... 

The application of biochar, as a partial solution, could take the form, as a base layer, in a tray, that barley seeds are broadcast over from which hydroponic fodder is grown. In this application, the char, root mass, and green biomass are direct fed. The barley seeds, biochar, and biomass can be nutrient primed to provide fuller nutrition.

The biochar can be used as a delivery system for the listed inputs.

Biochar can be integrated into all of the above commercial ideas to produce the desired outcome.

Garlic and biochar can be produced onsite or nearsite and used along with bread or beer yeast, in an integrated manner for the health of the farmer, livestock, plant, soil and earth.

In addition, red peppers, which contains capsaicin, can also be used for livestock health and grown onsite.

my 2 cents...

Mike



 





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

Rick Wilson
 

Kim, thanks!

The argument goes that if the energy in the food is not being used to produce methane, the energy would go into making the cattle larger, and perhaps the quality of the beef increases.
So do you know if they see increased carcass yield or quality?

Bromoform, CHBR3 can be made industrially, pretty simple process, and it's available today in small quantities.  
Harvesting seaweed, drying it, moving it around, has to be expensive and have a pretty bad carbon footprint. 
Why don’t just feed chemical bromform?

Seaweed, 100% reduction in methane is just such an extraordinary claim.  In Silicon Valley “extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof”

Rick

On Dec 2, 2020, at 9:58 PM, Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

Hi Rick,

Thanks for your post. Here are a few quotes from the WaPo article that indicate that seaweed could be a strong competitor for biochar as a livestock feed additive to reduce methane emissions, while increasing the yield of meat or milk production.  100% methane removal beats 17% methane removal.    

Several companies are in various stages of producing asparagopsis, which can be grown in tanks, even in places like Nebraska.  One company has already attracted venture capital.  I am aware of Heather Norbert’s excellent work.  I just think that we need to take seaweed seriously and see if there is a way that biochar could complement seaweed’s effectiveness.  IMHO, the way to do that would be to conduct research trials on combining biochar with seaweed.     

Kim    


Here are a few key excerpts from the WaPo article:

"In a study published in 2016, Kinley and his co-authors found that asparagopsis virtually eliminated methane emissions in lab trials. 

Asparagopsis and other types of seaweed have specialized gland cells that make and store bromoform, an organic compound. When the blurry red seaweed is freeze-dried, powdered and sprinkled as a garnish on a cow’s meal, bromoform blocks carbon and hydrogen atoms from forming methane in the stomach.

In response, the cow makes more propionate, a fatty acid that helps produce glucose in the metabolic process, allowing the animal to more efficiently grow or to produce more milk. That may enable farmers to use less feed and save money.

A number of companies have been working to make asparagopsis taxiformis and asparagopsis armata into commercial products that can be added to animal feed.

These companies are in various stages of production, with some using tanks on land to tinker with their seaweed strain before moving to grow in the ocean; others plan to always grow on land in tanks filled with ocean water and still more growing indoors. All are on the path toward commercialization, with one, Sea Forest, doing commercial trials with a wool producer and a dairy cooperative."


On Nov 28, 2020, at 1:53 AM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Kim, I have to believe that harvesting seaweed and delivering it to livestock has to be very expensive? And you have to consider where the livestock is and where the seafood is, not a lot of overlapping supply envelope. Do you think biochar is more cost effective than biochar?

Do you think that biochar is effective as seaweed at reducing methane emissions and improving feed efficiency?  

I have to believe the producing biochar locally, from collected waste, perhaps receiving a tipping fee, would make more economic sense?

Heather Norbert from University of Nebraska is the point person leading efforts to quantify the impact of feeding biochar to beef cows, this lady is a rock star.
It is becoming apparent that biochar reduces methane emissions from cows while increasing feed efficiency.  I’ve attached some recent articles supplied by her for the groups reference. 

Rick Wilson



On Nov 27, 2020, at 10:33 PM, Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

All,
Commercial seaweed production for livestock feed is taking off.  The climate benefits and economics look promising.  Could biochar producers demonstrate synergistic benefits to these new seaweed producers by adding biochar to their seaweed feed?  It might be worth a research trial.
Kim

An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate 

Scientists have discovered that feeding seaweed to cows significantly reduces the amount of methane they produce and burp into the atmosphere, while also helping them produce more milk and grow bigger on less feed. When grown in the ocean, seaweed helps to filter the water, making the idea of farming seaweed to feed to cows a win-win for the environment and farmers.
By Tatiana Schlossberg





<Nebraska Beef Report_Biochar.pdf><Translational Animal Science_Biochar.pdf>



Re: FW: [Biochar] [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate

mikethewormguy
 

Kevin,

Manipulation of the cows diet is the first step in reducing methane production in cows and cattle.....

Mike


Alternative forages: Specialist looks at different options | Livestock | hpj.com

mikethewormguy
 

https://www.hpj.com/livestock/alternative-forages-specialist-looks-at-different-options/article_f0fff650-ad4e-11e8-ad59-8f997d52a9ff.html


Here is an interesting read.  In all these cases, biochar could be used during the  growing cycle, as a soil amendment, as well as, direct fed.






Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

mikethewormguy
 

Michael,

Doing a quick look at methane production disruptors in cows that are in the commerce space we have... 

Red algae
Garlic
Essential oils
Yeast

Currently, we use garlic, essential oils, and yeast for soil&plant health, as well as, brown algae which contains the same bromoform active, as red algae. 

So depending on the livestock operation, layering multiple partial solutions, that also can be used for soil&plant health, could be as effective, as finding the single use magic bullet, for livestock and earth health, as well as, human health.... 

The application of biochar, as a partial solution, could take the form, as a base layer, in a tray, that barley seeds are broadcast over from which hydroponic fodder is grown. In this application, the char, root mass, and green biomass are direct fed. The barley seeds, biochar, and biomass can be nutrient primed to provide fuller nutrition.

The biochar can be used as a delivery system for the listed inputs.

Biochar can be integrated into all of the above commercial ideas to produce the desired outcome.

Garlic and biochar can be produced onsite or nearsite and used along with bread or beer yeast, in an integrated manner for the health of the farmer, livestock, plant, soil and earth.

In addition, red peppers, which contains capsaicin, can also be used for livestock health and grown onsite.

my 2 cents...

Mike



 





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


FW: [Biochar] [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate

Kevin Chisholm <kchisholm@...>
 

 

Hi Kim

 

Very interesting point about requiring “almost continuous feed” of seaweed to get a significant methane reduction benefit!

 

Has anyone seen figures for “Daily Release of Methane from “Feedlot Cattle” compared to “Pasture Fed Cattle””? I am guessing that it would be much higher for “Feedlot Cattle”, because of the “un-natural” feeding process… more frequent feeding of a higher caloric diet than in nature. 

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Trevor Richards
Sent: December 3, 2020 4:16 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate

 

Kim,

It is my understanding that seaweed extract needs to be fed nearly continuously to provide high methane reduction. This may be ok for feedlot systems but difficult for pasture based systems. Maybe biochar can provide slow release service. It would be a same if seaweed  ends up supporting unsustainable ag.systems such as feedlots.

 

On Thu, 3 Dec 2020, 18:59 Kim Chaffee, <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

Hi Rick,

 

Thanks for your post. Here are a few quotes from the WaPo article that indicate that seaweed could be a strong competitor for biochar as a livestock feed additive to reduce methane emissions, while increasing the yield of meat or milk production.  100% methane removal beats 17% methane removal.    

 

Several companies are in various stages of producing asparagopsis, which can be grown in tanks, even in places like Nebraska.  One company has already attracted venture capital.  I am aware of Heather Norbert’s excellent work.  I just think that we need to take seaweed seriously and see if there is a way that biochar could complement seaweed’s effectiveness.  IMHO, the way to do that would be to conduct research trials on combining biochar with seaweed.     

 

Kim    

 

 

Here are a few key excerpts from the WaPo article:

 

"In a study published in 2016, Kinley and his co-authors found that asparagopsis virtually eliminated methane emissions in lab trials. 

 

Asparagopsis and other types of seaweed have specialized gland cells that make and store bromoform, an organic compound. When the blurry red seaweed is freeze-dried, powdered and sprinkled as a garnish on a cow’s meal, bromoform blocks carbon and hydrogen atoms from forming methane in the stomach.

 

In response, the cow makes more propionate, a fatty acid that helps produce glucose in the metabolic process, allowing the animal to more efficiently grow or to produce more milk. That may enable farmers to use less feed and save money.

 

A number of companies have been working to make asparagopsis taxiformis and asparagopsis armata into commercial products that can be added to animal feed.

These companies are in various stages of production, with some using tanks on land to tinker with their seaweed strain before moving to grow in the ocean; others plan to always grow on land in tanks filled with ocean water and still more growing indoors. All are on the path toward commercialization, with one, Sea Forest, doing commercial trials with a wool producer and a dairy cooperative."

 

On Nov 28, 2020, at 1:53 AM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

 

Kim, I have to believe that harvesting seaweed and delivering it to livestock has to be very expensive? And you have to consider where the livestock is and where the seafood is, not a lot of overlapping supply envelope. Do you think biochar is more cost effective than biochar?

 

Do you think that biochar is effective as seaweed at reducing methane emissions and improving feed efficiency?  

 

I have to believe the producing biochar locally, from collected waste, perhaps receiving a tipping fee, would make more economic sense?

 

Heather Norbert from University of Nebraska is the point person leading efforts to quantify the impact of feeding biochar to beef cows, this lady is a rock star.

It is becoming apparent that biochar reduces methane emissions from cows while increasing feed efficiency.  I’ve attached some recent articles supplied by her for the groups reference. 

 

Rick Wilson

 

 

 

On Nov 27, 2020, at 10:33 PM, Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

 

All,

Commercial seaweed production for livestock feed is taking off.  The climate benefits and economics look promising.  Could biochar producers demonstrate synergistic benefits to these new seaweed producers by adding biochar to their seaweed feed?  It might be worth a research trial.

Kim

 

An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate 

 

Scientists have discovered that feeding seaweed to cows significantly reduces the amount of methane they produce and burp into the atmosphere, while also helping them produce more milk and grow bigger on less feed. When grown in the ocean, seaweed helps to filter the water, making the idea of farming seaweed to feed to cows a win-win for the environment and farmers.

By Tatiana Schlossberg

 

 

 

 

<Nebraska Beef Report_Biochar.pdf><Translational Animal Science_Biochar.pdf>

 


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

I think that all this is very cool. I think that it is also very important not to get hung up about a single aspect of biochar's role in animal feed. I have no idea what kelp or whatever contribute to animal health, to the value of their manure as fertilizer, the stink of their manure and so the fly/disease vector problem or to the issue of the ammonia reek of chicken barns that drives chickens crazy and can be alleviated by adding char to the floor litter.

I love the idea of adding kelp to animal feed. i am nervous about sounding the alarm that at "only" 17% methane reduction, biochar may be out of the animal feed additive business.

Besides, even if you can grow it in Nebraska, I suspect that I will be a long time before it is readily available to poor farmers in Malawi.

M




photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
Social icon Social icon Social icon

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 12:58 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
Hi Rick,

Thanks for your post. Here are a few quotes from the WaPo article that indicate that seaweed could be a strong competitor for biochar as a livestock feed additive to reduce methane emissions, while increasing the yield of meat or milk production.  100% methane removal beats 17% methane removal.    

Several companies are in various stages of producing asparagopsis, which can be grown in tanks, even in places like Nebraska.  One company has already attracted venture capital.  I am aware of Heather Norbert’s excellent work.  I just think that we need to take seaweed seriously and see if there is a way that biochar could complement seaweed’s effectiveness.  IMHO, the way to do that would be to conduct research trials on combining biochar with seaweed.     

Kim    


Here are a few key excerpts from the WaPo article:

"In a study published in 2016, Kinley and his co-authors found that asparagopsis virtually eliminated methane emissions in lab trials. 

Asparagopsis and other types of seaweed have specialized gland cells that make and store bromoform, an organic compound. When the blurry red seaweed is freeze-dried, powdered and sprinkled as a garnish on a cow’s meal, bromoform blocks carbon and hydrogen atoms from forming methane in the stomach.

In response, the cow makes more propionate, a fatty acid that helps produce glucose in the metabolic process, allowing the animal to more efficiently grow or to produce more milk. That may enable farmers to use less feed and save money.

A number of companies have been working to make asparagopsis taxiformis and asparagopsis armata into commercial products that can be added to animal feed.

These companies are in various stages of production, with some using tanks on land to tinker with their seaweed strain before moving to grow in the ocean; others plan to always grow on land in tanks filled with ocean water and still more growing indoors. All are on the path toward commercialization, with one, Sea Forest, doing commercial trials with a wool producer and a dairy cooperative."


On Nov 28, 2020, at 1:53 AM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Kim, I have to believe that harvesting seaweed and delivering it to livestock has to be very expensive? And you have to consider where the livestock is and where the seafood is, not a lot of overlapping supply envelope. Do you think biochar is more cost effective than biochar?

Do you think that biochar is effective as seaweed at reducing methane emissions and improving feed efficiency?  

I have to believe the producing biochar locally, from collected waste, perhaps receiving a tipping fee, would make more economic sense?

Heather Norbert from University of Nebraska is the point person leading efforts to quantify the impact of feeding biochar to beef cows, this lady is a rock star.
It is becoming apparent that biochar reduces methane emissions from cows while increasing feed efficiency.  I’ve attached some recent articles supplied by her for the groups reference. 

Rick Wilson



On Nov 27, 2020, at 10:33 PM, Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

All,
Commercial seaweed production for livestock feed is taking off.  The climate benefits and economics look promising.  Could biochar producers demonstrate synergistic benefits to these new seaweed producers by adding biochar to their seaweed feed?  It might be worth a research trial.
Kim

An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate 

Scientists have discovered that feeding seaweed to cows significantly reduces the amount of methane they produce and burp into the atmosphere, while also helping them produce more milk and grow bigger on less feed. When grown in the ocean, seaweed helps to filter the water, making the idea of farming seaweed to feed to cows a win-win for the environment and farmers.
By Tatiana Schlossberg





<Nebraska Beef Report_Biochar.pdf><Translational Animal Science_Biochar.pdf>


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

Stephen Joseph
 

Just out of interest I am working with Standard Bio in Norway and they have produced a really nice feedchar product.  Have a look at their web site.  There is a lot of interest and this will only increase with their government support.
Stephen

On Thu, Dec 3, 2020 at 2:11 PM Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Einar, is the farm-level climate calculator available to the public?  Something we might use in California perhaps?  Thanks! Rick

On Dec 1, 2020, at 12:22 AM, Einar Stuve <einar@...> wrote:

Hi
In Europe biochar are allowed as animal feed, and I believe that biochar as a feed additive is the biggest market for biochar. The biochar relives the gut on most farmed animals. The animals need to be productive and we feed them as much as they will eat. This often gives loose manure and trouble with the digestion. A small amount of biochar in the cereal for chicken, turkey, pigs, milking cows, calves and beef cattle relive the gut by binding some toxins, that cause the diarrhea. The beauty is that the extra cost for the individual farmer is relatively small, since the biochar amount is small. The farmer gets more healthy animals and this pays for the biochar. The other good part is that the biochar is still unchanged and will improve the quality of the manure as a fertilizer and soil improver. 

In Norway the farmer associations have made a contract with the government to cut CO2e emissions with 5 000 000 tons of CO2e within 10 years. The farmers have 8 measures on a list they will give priority. Number one is to introduce a climate calculator for every individual farm. This will help us understanding our own production and identifying what we have to do on our own farm to achieve the goals. Biochar is also on the list of focus areas. The Norwegian Biochar association are now working with the farmers association how to implement biochar in the climate calculator


Re: [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate #feed #seaweed

Frank Strie
 

A very valid and good point made here Trevor,
Thank you!
We are about regenerative agriculture and restorative forest management .
ProSilva and cheers
Frank again

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Trevor Richards
Sent: Thursday, December 3, 2020 7:16 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [The Washington Post] An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate

 

Kim,

It is my understanding that seaweed extract needs to be fed nearly continuously to provide high methane reduction. This may be ok for feedlot systems but difficult for pasture based systems. Maybe biochar can provide slow release service. It would be a same if seaweed  ends up supporting unsustainable ag.systems such as feedlots.

 

On Thu, 3 Dec 2020, 18:59 Kim Chaffee, <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

Hi Rick,

 

Thanks for your post. Here are a few quotes from the WaPo article that indicate that seaweed could be a strong competitor for biochar as a livestock feed additive to reduce methane emissions, while increasing the yield of meat or milk production.  100% methane removal beats 17% methane removal.    

 

Several companies are in various stages of producing asparagopsis, which can be grown in tanks, even in places like Nebraska.  One company has already attracted venture capital.  I am aware of Heather Norbert’s excellent work.  I just think that we need to take seaweed seriously and see if there is a way that biochar could complement seaweed’s effectiveness.  IMHO, the way to do that would be to conduct research trials on combining biochar with seaweed.     

 

Kim    

 

 

Here are a few key excerpts from the WaPo article:

 

"In a study published in 2016, Kinley and his co-authors found that asparagopsis virtually eliminated methane emissions in lab trials. 

 

Asparagopsis and other types of seaweed have specialized gland cells that make and store bromoform, an organic compound. When the blurry red seaweed is freeze-dried, powdered and sprinkled as a garnish on a cow’s meal, bromoform blocks carbon and hydrogen atoms from forming methane in the stomach.

 

In response, the cow makes more propionate, a fatty acid that helps produce glucose in the metabolic process, allowing the animal to more efficiently grow or to produce more milk. That may enable farmers to use less feed and save money.

 

A number of companies have been working to make asparagopsis taxiformis and asparagopsis armata into commercial products that can be added to animal feed.

These companies are in various stages of production, with some using tanks on land to tinker with their seaweed strain before moving to grow in the ocean; others plan to always grow on land in tanks filled with ocean water and still more growing indoors. All are on the path toward commercialization, with one, Sea Forest, doing commercial trials with a wool producer and a dairy cooperative."



On Nov 28, 2020, at 1:53 AM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

 

Kim, I have to believe that harvesting seaweed and delivering it to livestock has to be very expensive? And you have to consider where the livestock is and where the seafood is, not a lot of overlapping supply envelope. Do you think biochar is more cost effective than biochar?

 

Do you think that biochar is effective as seaweed at reducing methane emissions and improving feed efficiency?  

 

I have to believe the producing biochar locally, from collected waste, perhaps receiving a tipping fee, would make more economic sense?

 

Heather Norbert from University of Nebraska is the point person leading efforts to quantify the impact of feeding biochar to beef cows, this lady is a rock star.

It is becoming apparent that biochar reduces methane emissions from cows while increasing feed efficiency.  I’ve attached some recent articles supplied by her for the groups reference. 

 

Rick Wilson

 

 



On Nov 27, 2020, at 10:33 PM, Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:

 

All,

Commercial seaweed production for livestock feed is taking off.  The climate benefits and economics look promising.  Could biochar producers demonstrate synergistic benefits to these new seaweed producers by adding biochar to their seaweed feed?  It might be worth a research trial.

Kim

 

An unusual snack for cows, a powerful fix for climate 

 

Scientists have discovered that feeding seaweed to cows significantly reduces the amount of methane they produce and burp into the atmosphere, while also helping them produce more milk and grow bigger on less feed. When grown in the ocean, seaweed helps to filter the water, making the idea of farming seaweed to feed to cows a win-win for the environment and farmers.

By Tatiana Schlossberg

 

 



 

<Nebraska Beef Report_Biochar.pdf><Translational Animal Science_Biochar.pdf>

 

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