Date   

Re: White paper "Climate Intervention with Biochar" and related webinar on 10 Dec

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Methane point well taken. Sorry, I was thinking entirely in context of another project. I would consider NOx v. N2O, however, since the warming multiple is so big. (The math is in the footnotes, so you can recalculate easily.) I will get to FAO first thing today providing the site is back to normal.

Can't do the late night because of an early meeting many hours away.

M

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020, 1:52 PM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Michael,

 

Thanks for those comments.   I await your  re-calculations.

 

Although the methane is noteworthy, I would counter the comments by saying that a 20 year “penalty” is to be reduced if possible, but it is not sufficient to justify delays in using such technologies.    20 yrs out of 80 to the end of the century still leaves the sequestration value to be 60 years favorable, and then for many more additional centuries of sequestration value.  

 

Are you attending the US National Biochar Week that started Monday.   3 hours each day.   11 AM – 2 PM Eastern Time Zone.    Sorry that it is sooooooo late for you in Thailand.       Register (feee) at    www.easternbiochar.org    I have a 10 minute presentation today Tuesday at 12:30 PM Eastern  Time.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@... via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 12:10 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] White paper "Climate Intervention with Biochar" and related webinar on 10 Dec

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

I have been corresponding with Hans Pieter Schmidt and others of the biochar "biggies" about a new project involving the counting of small producer biochar in the climate change budget.

 

I have learned a number of interesting things. According to Schmidt, it is essential to separate our (as he calls it) "Kon-tiki" pyrolysis from other stuff because of the methane emitted. The methane, he argues, offsets carbon sequestration values for 20 years, that is, until the methane had entirely broken down. As far as I know, TLUDs do not emit methane.

 

He also contends that the "NOx bundle" is not considered "climate forcing" only N2) is, that he asserts it is not included in the bundle. S. Akagi does not give a separate EF for N2O. He would therefore contend that the 3.11 kg/tonne for NOx that is included in CO2e is not valid unless an EF for N2) can be found to replace it.

 

He also contends that while NH3 (ammonia) is a smog precursor, it is not a climate forcer and therefore cannot be counted in CO2e.

 

Finally, he says that the best way to go about our work is to focus exclusively on emissions reductions from open field burning of biomass and not try to deal with sequestration where the carbon math gets very complicated.

 

As for biomass totals, I have been doing a lot of reading. According to "scientific" sources,crop waste biomass is best measured as "dry matter," something that i have never encountered in the field and something that is NOT cited in the FAO stats. Koppmann, 2012, a big player in this realm, constantly refers to a late 1990s figure of 8.7 gigatonnes of waste biomass as dry matter. Corn cob from the field comes in at 15% moisture content or more such that this is equal to at least 10 gigatonnes + of not dry biomass. 

 

For whatever reason, FAOSTAT will not load just now, but when it does, I will re-run my numbers for say 1999 to see how they compare. Because feed and food crop production have increased so rapidly and so much in the past 20 years, I suspect that I will find that my figures and the DM figures are reasonably close.

 

I will let you know as soon as I can get to the website.

 

M




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Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

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On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 3:30 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

This white paper will be summarized and discussed at a free webinar that is announce in the attachment:  9 AM EST Thursday 10 December 2020.

Please forward this announcement to others who have interest in either our climate crisis or biochar or both.

Climate Intervention

with Biochar

A White Paper about Biochar and Energy (BC&E) for

Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) and Emission Reduction (ER)

First Edition dated 2020-12-07

Distributed from the website  www.woodgas.energy 

 

The white paper’s direct URL is    https://woodgas.energy/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Climate-Intervention-With-Biochar.pdf

 

Executive Summary of Biochar White Paper

Elevator Speech: 

            Major impacts to fight the climate crisis are possible now with the economical use of biochar and energy (BC&E) as a negative emissions technology (NET) for millennial sequestration of gigatons of atmospheric CO2e as a soil enhancement while also being an emission reduction (ER) source for valuable needed heat.  Opportunities for practical, prompt actions are in Part Two of the white paper.

* * *  Part One:  Biochar among the NETs  * * *

            A.  Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) involves two separate actions:  remove CO2 from the atmosphere and sequester it for at least hundreds of years.  Of the recognized Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs), only one good combination is functional now for gigatons of CDR. 

            B.   Natural photosynthesis by plants in forests, fields, wild lands, and oceans (as associated with AR, SCS, and OF) can do at low-cost massive amounts of CO2 removal by creating biomass that is abundant and can even be increased.  

            C.  Pyrolysis of that biomass can produce highly stable carbon for sequestration while also providing vast amounts of valuable heat, being the NET called Biochar and Energy (BC&E). 

            D.  Other technical solutions (DACCS, BECCS, EW and OF) are still in development stages involving sorbents and inorganic chemistry for expensive carbon capture and storage (CCS). 

            E.  It is time to recognize pyrolytic biochar from biomass as a practical way get CDR started immediately.

 * * *  Part Two:  Gigatons of CO2 Removal and Reduction via Biochar  * * *

            F.  Nearly 0.2 Gt CO2/yr currently is being made worldwide into stable carbon:  But it is charcoal produced to be burned for cooking for 2 billion people, not for sequestration.  Section XI. 

            G.  Micro-gasifier BC&E TLUD biomass cookstoves produce biochar equal to approximately 1 t CO2 removal per stove per year.  With carbon offset support, sustainable and even profitable fexpansion could sequester 0.25 Gt CO2e/yr with many SDG benefits for the bottom quintile of socio-economic families with a decrease in the consumption of biomass fuel.  Section XII. 

            H.  Recent (2020 patent application) advances in lower-cost mid-range BC&E char making technology help make scalable CDR solutions possible.  Section XIII.

            I.  Cleaner air is a benefit while sequestering a Gt of CO2e/yr from pyrolysis of crop residues, with co-benefits for SDGs.  Section XV. 

            J.  Biomass disposal via BC&E for fire safety, forestry slash and urban waste.   Section XVI.

            K.  Biomass pyrolysis and electric power production.  Sections XVII.

            L. Heat for housing and industrial process heat.   Sections XVIII and XIX.     

            M.  Co-benefits of Biochar and the financial value of CDR, by biochar    Sections XXI and XXII

            N.  A blockchain-secured carbon accounting and verifiable biochar sequestration recording and mapping system for ER and CDR is operational. Sections IX and XX.

* * *  Part Three:  Conclusions and Actions   * * *

            N.  Summary of CO2 removal via BC&E, reaching up to 9.2 Gt/yr CO2e. Section XXIV         

            O.  A call to action.  “If we cannot promptly implement these comparatively easy, benefit-rich Biochar and Energy (BC&E) initiatives, we will lose the battle to save our planet.”        Paul S. Anderson, PhD, Woodgas Pyrolytics, 7 December 2020 (psanders@... )

 

 

++++++++++++

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Frank Strie
 

Good morning Don,
This is an ever evolving process as was the development of the development of car transport and  aeroplanes…
Rather than to pinpoint  to what you like to see but not actually do, it would be more useful to demonstrate what is possible.
You can imagine that a Biochar producer may damage the reputation of the Biochar industry but have you ever actually designed, financed or built technology?
If you find it useful to condense incomplete smoke from a retort or gasifier, then do that, my network and I  will not stand in your way.
If the Regulator in NSW is different to other states, then you could chair the NSWBIG rather than indirectly creating hurdles beyond your reach.
If you like to have discussions in your group Re:
Many of my colleagues share my views on the Kontiki that it may not be the best for our brand overall …” then that is just as you like, I have no issue about someone’s opinion.  
However,  if / as you use a global / international discussion group like this one to express “your view and that of many of your colleagues” as the CEO of a Australia and New Zealand organisation that is about to draft a code of practice that may or potentially degrade and damage my business interests “
with respect” then I do have a big issue with that.

There are many ways and many reasons why we make Pyrogenic Carbon.
Seriously
Frank Strie
Terra Preta Developments
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 9:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank & Geoff,

This is a discussion group, lets just stick to the points brought up rather than lowest common denominator judgements hey?! That being, Hans Peter's statement in the webinar mentioned that a Kontiki releases methane and can take 35 years to be carbon neutral or negative. Your thoughts on this? Also naked flame fire risk. If we can also capture wood vinegar and syngas in these smaller mobile units we are going to be much closer to confidently rolling them out in ANZ because we will have a much more accurate idea of being carbon negative or as close thereof via a Life Cycle Assessment IMO only. I'm not into taking dangerous or cheaper shortcuts, I'd like to get it right and hence why I've stuck as best I can to the NSW legislation and I'm not even there yet. For discussion. 

The units I put up are a member and non member so despite the false claims this is simply a discussion about the safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. I hear your points Frank about PT & SJ hood design which was just an example of a way to perhaps make the Kontiki safer to operate but I particularly like Robert Laird's mobile retort fully enclosed, producing wood vinegar too and cooking off syngas. Once again he is not a member of ANZBIG. Any comments on this design? This is where' I'd like to see the industry go. I'm not saying I'm right, maybe I've missed something but its open for discussion. Many of my colleagues share my views on the Kontiki that it may not be the best for our brand overall, I am agnostic for now but tend to agree. 

Also, Aboriginals are doing cool savannah burnings in winter to manage the land so I did qualify that the Kontiki is a better way than burning off or landfilling and I did also say respected what you've done Frank. I expect the same in return. I think it's great that you've developed an efficient solar powered fire fighter Geoff. I've heard of Robert Tonks who has invented a biochar liquid spray for fire fighting and a replacement for PFAS. Now CSIRO want to publish his work. Like anything prevention is better than cure is it not?

Have a good day gentlemen, its another scorcher out there! 

 Chars, 

Don 


Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Don Coyne
 

Hi Frank & Geoff,

This is a discussion group, lets just stick to the points brought up rather than lowest common denominator judgements hey?! That being, Hans Peter's statement in the webinar mentioned that a Kontiki releases methane and can take 35 years to be carbon neutral or negative. Your thoughts on this? Also naked flame fire risk. If we can also capture wood vinegar and syngas in these smaller mobile units we are going to be much closer to confidently rolling them out in ANZ because we will have a much more accurate idea of being carbon negative or as close thereof via a Life Cycle Assessment IMO only. I'm not into taking dangerous or cheaper shortcuts, I'd like to get it right and hence why I've stuck as best I can to the NSW legislation and I'm not even there yet. For discussion. 

The units I put up are a member and non member so despite the false claims this is simply a discussion about the safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. I hear your points Frank about PT & SJ hood design which was just an example of a way to perhaps make the Kontiki safer to operate but I particularly like Robert Laird's mobile retort fully enclosed, producing wood vinegar too and cooking off syngas. Once again he is not a member of ANZBIG. Any comments on this design? This is where' I'd like to see the industry go. I'm not saying I'm right, maybe I've missed something but its open for discussion. Many of my colleagues share my views on the Kontiki that it may not be the best for our brand overall, I am agnostic for now but tend to agree. 

Also, Aboriginals are doing cool savannah burnings in winter to manage the land so I did qualify that the Kontiki is a better way than burning off or landfilling and I did also say respected what you've done Frank. I expect the same in return. I think it's great that you've developed an efficient solar powered fire fighter Geoff. I've heard of Robert Tonks who has invented a biochar liquid spray for fire fighting and a replacement for PFAS. Now CSIRO want to publish his work. Like anything prevention is better than cure is it not?

Have a good day gentlemen, its another scorcher out there! 

 Chars, 

Don 


Re: To Bob Wells to request an update please

Paul S Anderson
 

Bob,

 

Thanks for the photo and description.   The inevitable questions:  What is its selling price, now many sold (or in use), and input and output figures.

 

It could be ideal for some situations.  

 

And thanks for your encouragement about my small products.   I hope that you and others will comment about my white paper, which is about climate and carbon dioxide removal (CDR) and how biochar can assist.   We need ALL types of biochar production.  White paper is at   www.woodgas.energy 

 

And we need records of biochar into soil as sequestration.   For the CharTrac carbon accounting system (Sections IX and XX), I am starting to seek people and projects as examples that can be entered into CharTrac.   Much to be discussed.   

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Wells via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 1:49 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] To Bob Wells to request an update please

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Thanks Paul,

 

    I love to see all your innovation!

    We build a much updated retort now that has a gas condenser for distillates, a vacuum unloading system, a thermal oxidizer, a heat exchanger for energy capture, and a PLC to run it all so that we can just load it and let it run.  There are also lots of post processing options available. Of course this all makes it much more expensive for the average small farmer but for the U.S. we have to meet so many standards and still try to make it economical with our high cost of labor. 

   Your inventions should fill some important niches.  Keep up the good work.


Re: To Bob Wells to request an update please

Bob Wells
 

Thanks Paul,

    I love to see all your innovation!
    We build a much updated retort now that has a gas condenser for distillates, a vacuum unloading system, a thermal oxidizer, a heat exchanger for energy capture, and a PLC to run it all so that we can just load it and let it run.  There are also lots of post processing options available. Of course this all makes it much more expensive for the average small farmer but for the U.S. we have to meet so many standards and still try to make it economical with our high cost of labor. 
   Your inventions should fill some important niches.  Keep up the good work.


To Bob Wells to request an update please

Paul S Anderson
 

 

 

 

Bob,   Please send info about the automation capabilities of the Adam retort so that I can accurately describe it.

 

Thanks.

 

Paul

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


URGENT - EU TAXONOMY & Biochar - CLOSING 18 DEC 2020

Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

8.DEC.2020

 

Hello Biochar global Community

 

we recently came to know that on 20 November 2020 the European Commission has launched a public consultation on the EU Taxonomy criteria for the two sustainability objectives: 

  1. climate change mitigation and 
  2. climate change adaptation.

 

The criteria are based on the Technical Screening Criteria previously published by the Technical Expert Group (TEG) but include both amendments and news.

 

The Feedback Period 20 November 2020 - 18 December 2020  (midnight Brussels time)!!!

 

 

WHY BOTHER? 

 

The main concern here is that in the current draft of the Taxonomy there is no mention of Biochar and Wood Vinegar, nor the relative practices for reducing CO2 in the atmosphere which these practices can deliver. 

 

It is our opinion, that this gap in the knowledge of the practices for reducing CO2 should be amended as soon as possible, because the lack of this knowledge and understanding on the environmental and economic potential of biochar, which instead has been already recognized at IPCC level. 

 

We think it would be a missed opportunity not only for you all, who have been working for and with biochar for so many years, but also for the whole agricultural sector and, most importantly, for the environment we all live in.

 

We thought to use the opportunity of providing formal feedback by the 18 DEC 2020 to the EU authorities so that they can amend this gap.

 

We have prepared a draft paper available online for comments and undersigning EU Taxonomy and Biochar - Documenti Google

 

To all of you we pose the following questions:

 

  1. are you interested in collaborating in the drafting of the feedback paper we have set up, making it more compelling and effective with examples and citations of governmental documents touting biochar both in the EU countries and globally (in case either include your comments in the online draft or send by email asap)

 

  1. whom, in your opinion, should we also contact / involve that is not already in this group (please feel free to forward this appeal to anyone you think might help)

 

in particular we are thinking both in terms of the people who could sign this "petition" just to support it, but also in terms of people / organizations / institutions, who/which might be able/entitled to take direct contact with the Technical Expert Group (TEG) either because they have access to the members of the TEG or because they have experience in presenting cases to the Commission or lobbying in Brussels in general, 

 

  1. in your experience, are there other and more effective ways to catch the attention of these technical groups who advise the EU Commission,
    so that biochar is finally put on their radar and always included from now on, in their determinations? 

 

  1. in case you had already been made aware of this issue, who else is working in a similar direction? 

 

unless you think your response is relevant for everybody, please write directly to info@... rather than using reply to the whole mailing list

 

all the best

 

Tomaso

 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
BiokW – Valorizzazione Energetica e Ambientale delle Biomasse  

Dr Ing Tomaso Bertoli – MISE Innovation Manager
P.za Duomo, 30

38122 Trento - Italy

Mobile: +39 346 09 41 392

E-mail: tomaso.bertoli@...
E-mail: tomaso.bertoli@...
PEC: tomaso.bertoli@...
PEC: 
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Re: White paper "Climate Intervention with Biochar" and related webinar on 10 Dec

Paul S Anderson
 

Michael,

 

Thanks for those comments.   I await your  re-calculations.

 

Although the methane is noteworthy, I would counter the comments by saying that a 20 year “penalty” is to be reduced if possible, but it is not sufficient to justify delays in using such technologies.    20 yrs out of 80 to the end of the century still leaves the sequestration value to be 60 years favorable, and then for many more additional centuries of sequestration value.  

 

Are you attending the US National Biochar Week that started Monday.   3 hours each day.   11 AM – 2 PM Eastern Time Zone.    Sorry that it is sooooooo late for you in Thailand.       Register (feee) at    www.easternbiochar.org    I have a 10 minute presentation today Tuesday at 12:30 PM Eastern  Time.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@... via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 12:10 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] White paper "Climate Intervention with Biochar" and related webinar on 10 Dec

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Paul,

 

I have been corresponding with Hans Pieter Schmidt and others of the biochar "biggies" about a new project involving the counting of small producer biochar in the climate change budget.

 

I have learned a number of interesting things. According to Schmidt, it is essential to separate our (as he calls it) "Kon-tiki" pyrolysis from other stuff because of the methane emitted. The methane, he argues, offsets carbon sequestration values for 20 years, that is, until the methane had entirely broken down. As far as I know, TLUDs do not emit methane.

 

He also contends that the "NOx bundle" is not considered "climate forcing" only N2) is, that he asserts it is not included in the bundle. S. Akagi does not give a separate EF for N2O. He would therefore contend that the 3.11 kg/tonne for NOx that is included in CO2e is not valid unless an EF for N2) can be found to replace it.

 

He also contends that while NH3 (ammonia) is a smog precursor, it is not a climate forcer and therefore cannot be counted in CO2e.

 

Finally, he says that the best way to go about our work is to focus exclusively on emissions reductions from open field burning of biomass and not try to deal with sequestration where the carbon math gets very complicated.

 

As for biomass totals, I have been doing a lot of reading. According to "scientific" sources,crop waste biomass is best measured as "dry matter," something that i have never encountered in the field and something that is NOT cited in the FAO stats. Koppmann, 2012, a big player in this realm, constantly refers to a late 1990s figure of 8.7 gigatonnes of waste biomass as dry matter. Corn cob from the field comes in at 15% moisture content or more such that this is equal to at least 10 gigatonnes + of not dry biomass. 

 

For whatever reason, FAOSTAT will not load just now, but when it does, I will re-run my numbers for say 1999 to see how they compare. Because feed and food crop production have increased so rapidly and so much in the past 20 years, I suspect that I will find that my figures and the DM figures are reasonably close.

 

I will let you know as soon as I can get to the website.

 

M




photo

Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

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On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 3:30 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

This white paper will be summarized and discussed at a free webinar that is announce in the attachment:  9 AM EST Thursday 10 December 2020.

Please forward this announcement to others who have interest in either our climate crisis or biochar or both.

Climate Intervention

with Biochar

A White Paper about Biochar and Energy (BC&E) for

Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) and Emission Reduction (ER)

First Edition dated 2020-12-07

Distributed from the website  www.woodgas.energy 

 

The white paper’s direct URL is    https://woodgas.energy/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Climate-Intervention-With-Biochar.pdf

 

Executive Summary of Biochar White Paper

Elevator Speech: 

            Major impacts to fight the climate crisis are possible now with the economical use of biochar and energy (BC&E) as a negative emissions technology (NET) for millennial sequestration of gigatons of atmospheric CO2e as a soil enhancement while also being an emission reduction (ER) source for valuable needed heat.  Opportunities for practical, prompt actions are in Part Two of the white paper.

* * *  Part One:  Biochar among the NETs  * * *

            A.  Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) involves two separate actions:  remove CO2 from the atmosphere and sequester it for at least hundreds of years.  Of the recognized Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs), only one good combination is functional now for gigatons of CDR. 

            B.   Natural photosynthesis by plants in forests, fields, wild lands, and oceans (as associated with AR, SCS, and OF) can do at low-cost massive amounts of CO2 removal by creating biomass that is abundant and can even be increased.  

            C.  Pyrolysis of that biomass can produce highly stable carbon for sequestration while also providing vast amounts of valuable heat, being the NET called Biochar and Energy (BC&E). 

            D.  Other technical solutions (DACCS, BECCS, EW and OF) are still in development stages involving sorbents and inorganic chemistry for expensive carbon capture and storage (CCS). 

            E.  It is time to recognize pyrolytic biochar from biomass as a practical way get CDR started immediately.

 * * *  Part Two:  Gigatons of CO2 Removal and Reduction via Biochar  * * *

            F.  Nearly 0.2 Gt CO2/yr currently is being made worldwide into stable carbon:  But it is charcoal produced to be burned for cooking for 2 billion people, not for sequestration.  Section XI. 

            G.  Micro-gasifier BC&E TLUD biomass cookstoves produce biochar equal to approximately 1 t CO2 removal per stove per year.  With carbon offset support, sustainable and even profitable fexpansion could sequester 0.25 Gt CO2e/yr with many SDG benefits for the bottom quintile of socio-economic families with a decrease in the consumption of biomass fuel.  Section XII. 

            H.  Recent (2020 patent application) advances in lower-cost mid-range BC&E char making technology help make scalable CDR solutions possible.  Section XIII.

            I.  Cleaner air is a benefit while sequestering a Gt of CO2e/yr from pyrolysis of crop residues, with co-benefits for SDGs.  Section XV. 

            J.  Biomass disposal via BC&E for fire safety, forestry slash and urban waste.   Section XVI.

            K.  Biomass pyrolysis and electric power production.  Sections XVII.

            L. Heat for housing and industrial process heat.   Sections XVIII and XIX.     

            M.  Co-benefits of Biochar and the financial value of CDR, by biochar    Sections XXI and XXII

            N.  A blockchain-secured carbon accounting and verifiable biochar sequestration recording and mapping system for ER and CDR is operational. Sections IX and XX.

* * *  Part Three:  Conclusions and Actions   * * *

            N.  Summary of CO2 removal via BC&E, reaching up to 9.2 Gt/yr CO2e. Section XXIV         

            O.  A call to action.  “If we cannot promptly implement these comparatively easy, benefit-rich Biochar and Energy (BC&E) initiatives, we will lose the battle to save our planet.”        Paul S. Anderson, PhD, Woodgas Pyrolytics, 7 December 2020 (psanders@... )

 

 

++++++++++++

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Solar and Pyrogenic Carbon ... RE: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Frank Strie
 

Hello Geoff,
It sounds that you were way in front on Solar!
Tomorrow we get an  ‘Advanced Meter /smart meter’ installed by the Tasmanian Power Authority and the following day or two  we will get our own 18 panel Solar Power System installed.
It will be interesting how we go with it but considering the boom uptake these days this technology will only grow ever further.
Thinking about renewable energy utilisation:
This afternoon whilst I was working outside, I was able to listened to an interesting discussion by  BOKU student initiative podcast from the University of Vienna, talking about the recycling / upcycling  potential of currently used batteries in e-transport cars as they age and loose performance after some years. Most thought when asked the question of what they thought the % would be to be less than 20% even 5% .
The program available on Soundcloud  is called: “Hör mal wer die Welt verändert
” – OR – “Listen who is changing the world”
To everyone’s surprise the 96%+  figure of current technical recycling potential was mentioned.
So, it just shows how opinions change with better and good information.
The question always comes back to an agenda, Why?, What?, Who?,  Where? and How? and even by when? things get explored and done.
So the flow of information these days is amazing and when we know the clear answer to Why? do we do what we do, things have a good chance to progress.  Back into the Garden to harvest some fresh Berries and super tender and tasty Asparagus spears. There is still lots to plant and to seeds to get going in this year’s perfect weather early Tassie’s summer season.
Cheers and greetings
Frank





 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 3:18 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

OOPS, I meant late 80’s when I was in the beginning of the Solar industry, sorry.

G

 

On 8 Dec 2020, at 1:06 pm, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

 

Hi Frank, I have had this argument with Don, he has a normal but unfortunate tendency to think he knows best.

I think my points dovetail with yours, as I pointed out to him that when I was in the beginning of the Solar development days, = back in the early 2000,s it was quite an open thing, - like Biochar now, there was not much bureaucratic interference.

Then through grants, everybody had to be accredited, the bureaucrats, suddenly found they had another thing they could say no to, but fortunately no-one wanted them to as Solar was gaining in popularity, and only now, as the Industry has come of age, have the bureaucrats finally got enough power to squash it but it is too big to squash, so they can only get away with helpful bits around the edges.

That is the stage Biochar has to reach, when it is full grown, and developing all along the frontier, is the only time Bureaucrats should be allowed any power, - then minor tweaking on safety issues etc. is fine, it won’t kill it.

 

In regard to fires, in Australia there are strict no-burn times and they would apply to any open fire except totally indoors.

As a lot of fires are started accidentally, - only occasionally deliberately, the pressure on stronger legislation is increasing. - You can tell Don I have developed a new water delivery system for fire trucks that will allow all firetrucks so fitted to be 15 minutes earlier to a fire call out than now.

I am happy to share the concept with him, - or anyone in such other fire suffering places as America for that matter.

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

On 8 Dec 2020, at 9:45 am, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 

 

As long as people, land managers, farm and forest owners are allowed in Australia and even encouraged by State Fire Authorities to reduce  biomass fuel by setting it alight with a drip torch or Heli-torch because it is seen as best option, there is a wide ranging options to deal with small to medium scale char productions.
The organisation is not a Authority but a represents interests of its members.
As long as it is possible to go to the next Big Box Hardware chain store to get a fire bowl  that can be used for all sorts of ways, and if someone uses a fire pit method to address the various issues, needs an opportunities to make char / Pyrogenic Carbon for all sorts of things, then this reality. 
‘Big Brother’ will  do what big brothers sometimes trying to do, the objective should be a better future. 
So, when someone is creative and thinks about to assist and to make things happen, the last thing we need is to confuse the community.
Education, training, demonstration and conversation around the kilns do a lot to explore pathways  for a better future, be that in Tassie, VIC, WA, Qld, Spain or somewhere else. The value of the ‘Kin Tiki’ deep con kiln  and the Oregon Kiln and the many other flame curtain processes in various shapes and sizes and design features lead to education and the ability to get things done. 
Balz Baur of BAZNA in Serbia is an innovative operator who utilises the thermal energy next to a shed via a smart heat exchanger.

The photos Don has shared from about 2015 if I recall have no heat & wind shield, no air injection ring tube and the emissions tests from that process next to a rubber tired platform is something not to be recommended. 
I recall photos that Paul Taylor shared with me at the time of a truck load of short wood blocks / offcuts that was unloaded at the time.
This feedstock is very different to vineyard and fruit orchard and nut and olive  grove material that many use. 
Over the years, our (very happy) clients around Australia TAS, VIC, WA, QLD know why they have chosen to get a KON-TIKI-TAS kiln from 300litre, 1m3 and 1,85m3 size. 
2021 will be interesting and we will be exhibiting for the 6th time at Agfest in early May with anything from as little as 100litre per batch  to 14,000to/pa continuous flow technologies. 
It is great to see how more and more Regions explore the opportunities at every scale appropriate to the local conditions and needs.
The Gippsland Climate Action Network covers a huge area with many reasons to encourage, inform, train, imagine how to restore what was lost and what needs to be done to make it another valuable  ‘Centre of Expertise’ in things renewable and sustainability.
There is lots to do and the last thing we need is to confuse the community and regulators with ‘red herrings’.
Don, if you like, watch this and see what we (incl. me and my son) have been involved with,  way back: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qwVsv5OqIg to bring about change. All a matter scale.

The process continues.
Frank again
 

  <image005.png>

 

 

 

<image006.png>

 

 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don  

 

 


Re: White paper "Climate Intervention with Biochar" and related webinar on 10 Dec

d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Paul,

I have been corresponding with Hans Pieter Schmidt and others of the biochar "biggies" about a new project involving the counting of small producer biochar in the climate change budget.

I have learned a number of interesting things. According to Schmidt, it is essential to separate our (as he calls it) "Kon-tiki" pyrolysis from other stuff because of the methane emitted. The methane, he argues, offsets carbon sequestration values for 20 years, that is, until the methane had entirely broken down. As far as I know, TLUDs do not emit methane.

He also contends that the "NOx bundle" is not considered "climate forcing" only N2) is, that he asserts it is not included in the bundle. S. Akagi does not give a separate EF for N2O. He would therefore contend that the 3.11 kg/tonne for NOx that is included in CO2e is not valid unless an EF for N2) can be found to replace it.

He also contends that while NH3 (ammonia) is a smog precursor, it is not a climate forcer and therefore cannot be counted in CO2e.

Finally, he says that the best way to go about our work is to focus exclusively on emissions reductions from open field burning of biomass and not try to deal with sequestration where the carbon math gets very complicated.

As for biomass totals, I have been doing a lot of reading. According to "scientific" sources,crop waste biomass is best measured as "dry matter," something that i have never encountered in the field and something that is NOT cited in the FAO stats. Koppmann, 2012, a big player in this realm, constantly refers to a late 1990s figure of 8.7 gigatonnes of waste biomass as dry matter. Corn cob from the field comes in at 15% moisture content or more such that this is equal to at least 10 gigatonnes + of not dry biomass. 

For whatever reason, FAOSTAT will not load just now, but when it does, I will re-run my numbers for say 1999 to see how they compare. Because feed and food crop production have increased so rapidly and so much in the past 20 years, I suspect that I will find that my figures and the DM figures are reasonably close.

I will let you know as soon as I can get to the website.

M




photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
Social icon Social icon Social icon

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 3:30 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

This white paper will be summarized and discussed at a free webinar that is announce in the attachment:  9 AM EST Thursday 10 December 2020.

Please forward this announcement to others who have interest in either our climate crisis or biochar or both.

Climate Intervention

with Biochar

A White Paper about Biochar and Energy (BC&E) for

Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) and Emission Reduction (ER)

First Edition dated 2020-12-07

Distributed from the website  www.woodgas.energy 

 

The white paper’s direct URL is    https://woodgas.energy/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Climate-Intervention-With-Biochar.pdf

 

Executive Summary of Biochar White Paper

Elevator Speech: 

            Major impacts to fight the climate crisis are possible now with the economical use of biochar and energy (BC&E) as a negative emissions technology (NET) for millennial sequestration of gigatons of atmospheric CO2e as a soil enhancement while also being an emission reduction (ER) source for valuable needed heat.  Opportunities for practical, prompt actions are in Part Two of the white paper.

* * *  Part One:  Biochar among the NETs  * * *

            A.  Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) involves two separate actions:  remove CO2 from the atmosphere and sequester it for at least hundreds of years.  Of the recognized Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs), only one good combination is functional now for gigatons of CDR. 

            B.   Natural photosynthesis by plants in forests, fields, wild lands, and oceans (as associated with AR, SCS, and OF) can do at low-cost massive amounts of CO2 removal by creating biomass that is abundant and can even be increased.  

            C.  Pyrolysis of that biomass can produce highly stable carbon for sequestration while also providing vast amounts of valuable heat, being the NET called Biochar and Energy (BC&E). 

            D.  Other technical solutions (DACCS, BECCS, EW and OF) are still in development stages involving sorbents and inorganic chemistry for expensive carbon capture and storage (CCS). 

            E.  It is time to recognize pyrolytic biochar from biomass as a practical way get CDR started immediately.

 * * *  Part Two:  Gigatons of CO2 Removal and Reduction via Biochar  * * *

            F.  Nearly 0.2 Gt CO2/yr currently is being made worldwide into stable carbon:  But it is charcoal produced to be burned for cooking for 2 billion people, not for sequestration.  Section XI. 

            G.  Micro-gasifier BC&E TLUD biomass cookstoves produce biochar equal to approximately 1 t CO2 removal per stove per year.  With carbon offset support, sustainable and even profitable fexpansion could sequester 0.25 Gt CO2e/yr with many SDG benefits for the bottom quintile of socio-economic families with a decrease in the consumption of biomass fuel.  Section XII. 

            H.  Recent (2020 patent application) advances in lower-cost mid-range BC&E char making technology help make scalable CDR solutions possible.  Section XIII.

            I.  Cleaner air is a benefit while sequestering a Gt of CO2e/yr from pyrolysis of crop residues, with co-benefits for SDGs.  Section XV. 

            J.  Biomass disposal via BC&E for fire safety, forestry slash and urban waste.   Section XVI.

            K.  Biomass pyrolysis and electric power production.  Sections XVII.

            L. Heat for housing and industrial process heat.   Sections XVIII and XIX.     

            M.  Co-benefits of Biochar and the financial value of CDR, by biochar    Sections XXI and XXII

            N.  A blockchain-secured carbon accounting and verifiable biochar sequestration recording and mapping system for ER and CDR is operational. Sections IX and XX.

* * *  Part Three:  Conclusions and Actions   * * *

            N.  Summary of CO2 removal via BC&E, reaching up to 9.2 Gt/yr CO2e. Section XXIV         

            O.  A call to action.  “If we cannot promptly implement these comparatively easy, benefit-rich Biochar and Energy (BC&E) initiatives, we will lose the battle to save our planet.”        Paul S. Anderson, PhD, Woodgas Pyrolytics, 7 December 2020 (psanders@... )

 

 

++++++++++++

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Geoff Thomas
 

OOPS, I meant late 80’s when I was in the beginning of the Solar industry, sorry.
G

On 8 Dec 2020, at 1:06 pm, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I have had this argument with Don, he has a normal but unfortunate tendency to think he knows best.
I think my points dovetail with yours, as I pointed out to him that when I was in the beginning of the Solar development days, = back in the early 2000,s it was quite an open thing, - like Biochar now, there was not much bureaucratic interference.
Then through grants, everybody had to be accredited, the bureaucrats, suddenly found they had another thing they could say no to, but fortunately no-one wanted them to as Solar was gaining in popularity, and only now, as the Industry has come of age, have the bureaucrats finally got enough power to squash it but it is too big to squash, so they can only get away with helpful bits around the edges.
That is the stage Biochar has to reach, when it is full grown, and developing all along the frontier, is the only time Bureaucrats should be allowed any power, - then minor tweaking on safety issues etc. is fine, it won’t kill it.

In regard to fires, in Australia there are strict no-burn times and they would apply to any open fire except totally indoors.
As a lot of fires are started accidentally, - only occasionally deliberately, the pressure on stronger legislation is increasing. - You can tell Don I have developed a new water delivery system for fire trucks that will allow all firetrucks so fitted to be 15 minutes earlier to a fire call out than now.
I am happy to share the concept with him, - or anyone in such other fire suffering places as America for that matter.

Cheers,
Geoff.
On 8 Dec 2020, at 9:45 am, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 
As long as people, land managers, farm and forest owners are allowed in Australia and even encouraged by State Fire Authorities to reduce  biomass fuel by setting it alight with a drip torch or Heli-torch because it is seen as best option, there is a wide ranging options to deal with small to medium scale char productions.
The organisation is not a Authority but a represents interests of its members.
As long as it is possible to go to the next Big Box Hardware chain store to get a fire bowl  that can be used for all sorts of ways, and if someone uses a fire pit method to address the various issues, needs an opportunities to make char / Pyrogenic Carbon for all sorts of things, then this reality. 
‘Big Brother’ will  do what big brothers sometimes trying to do, the objective should be a better future. 
So, when someone is creative and thinks about to assist and to make things happen, the last thing we need is to confuse the community.
Education, training, demonstration and conversation around the kilns do a lot to explore pathways  for a better future, be that in Tassie, VIC, WA, Qld, Spain or somewhere else. The value of the ‘Kin Tiki’ deep con kiln  and the Oregon Kiln and the many other flame curtain processes in various shapes and sizes and design features lead to education and the ability to get things done. 
Balz Baur of BAZNA in Serbia is an innovative operator who utilises the thermal energy next to a shed via a smart heat exchanger.

The photos Don has shared from about 2015 if I recall have no heat & wind shield, no air injection ring tube and the emissions tests from that process next to a rubber tired platform is something not to be recommended. 
I recall photos that Paul Taylor shared with me at the time of a truck load of short wood blocks / offcuts that was unloaded at the time.
This feedstock is very different to vineyard and fruit orchard and nut and olive  grove material that many use. 
Over the years, our (very happy) clients around Australia TAS, VIC, WA, QLD know why they have chosen to get a KON-TIKI-TAS kiln from 300litre, 1m3 and 1,85m3 size. 
2021 will be interesting and we will be exhibiting for the 6th time at Agfest in early May with anything from as little as 100litre per batch  to 14,000to/pa continuous flow technologies. 
It is great to see how more and more Regions explore the opportunities at every scale appropriate to the local conditions and needs.
The Gippsland Climate Action Network covers a huge area with many reasons to encourage, inform, train, imagine how to restore what was lost and what needs to be done to make it another valuable  ‘Centre of Expertise’ in things renewable and sustainability.
There is lots to do and the last thing we need is to confuse the community and regulators with ‘red herrings’.
Don, if you like, watch this and see what we (incl. me and my son) have been involved with,  way back: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qwVsv5OqIg to bring about change. All a matter scale.
The process continues.
Frank again
 
  <image005.png>
 
 
 
<image006.png>
 
 
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.
 
Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don  




FW: Video presentation about CDR

Paul S Anderson
 

This is with a clear biochar focus with a perspective about the  world climate crisis.

 

For an informative and animated presentation about the need for CDR and the different options, see

Albert Bates’s recent (mid-October 2020) presentation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2B2GQ2FQmWs .

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434


Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Frank, I have had this argument with Don, he has a normal but unfortunate tendency to think he knows best.
I think my points dovetail with yours, as I pointed out to him that when I was in the beginning of the Solar development days, = back in the early 2000,s it was quite an open thing, - like Biochar now, there was not much bureaucratic interference.
Then through grants, everybody had to be accredited, the bureaucrats, suddenly found they had another thing they could say no to, but fortunately no-one wanted them to as Solar was gaining in popularity, and only now, as the Industry has come of age, have the bureaucrats finally got enough power to squash it but it is too big to squash, so they can only get away with helpful bits around the edges.
That is the stage Biochar has to reach, when it is full grown, and developing all along the frontier, is the only time Bureaucrats should be allowed any power, - then minor tweaking on safety issues etc. is fine, it won’t kill it.

In regard to fires, in Australia there are strict no-burn times and they would apply to any open fire except totally indoors.
As a lot of fires are started accidentally, - only occasionally deliberately, the pressure on stronger legislation is increasing. - You can tell Don I have developed a new water delivery system for fire trucks that will allow all firetrucks so fitted to be 15 minutes earlier to a fire call out than now.
I am happy to share the concept with him, - or anyone in such other fire suffering places as America for that matter.

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 8 Dec 2020, at 9:45 am, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 
As long as people, land managers, farm and forest owners are allowed in Australia and even encouraged by State Fire Authorities to reduce  biomass fuel by setting it alight with a drip torch or Heli-torch because it is seen as best option, there is a wide ranging options to deal with small to medium scale char productions.
The organisation is not a Authority but a represents interests of its members.
As long as it is possible to go to the next Big Box Hardware chain store to get a fire bowl  that can be used for all sorts of ways, and if someone uses a fire pit method to address the various issues, needs an opportunities to make char / Pyrogenic Carbon for all sorts of things, then this reality. 
‘Big Brother’ will  do what big brothers sometimes trying to do, the objective should be a better future. 
So, when someone is creative and thinks about to assist and to make things happen, the last thing we need is to confuse the community.
Education, training, demonstration and conversation around the kilns do a lot to explore pathways  for a better future, be that in Tassie, VIC, WA, Qld, Spain or somewhere else. The value of the ‘Kin Tiki’ deep con kiln  and the Oregon Kiln and the many other flame curtain processes in various shapes and sizes and design features lead to education and the ability to get things done. 
Balz Baur of BAZNA in Serbia is an innovative operator who utilises the thermal energy next to a shed via a smart heat exchanger.

The photos Don has shared from about 2015 if I recall have no heat & wind shield, no air injection ring tube and the emissions tests from that process next to a rubber tired platform is something not to be recommended. 
I recall photos that Paul Taylor shared with me at the time of a truck load of short wood blocks / offcuts that was unloaded at the time.
This feedstock is very different to vineyard and fruit orchard and nut and olive  grove material that many use. 
Over the years, our (very happy) clients around Australia TAS, VIC, WA, QLD know why they have chosen to get a KON-TIKI-TAS kiln from 300litre, 1m3 and 1,85m3 size. 
2021 will be interesting and we will be exhibiting for the 6th time at Agfest in early May with anything from as little as 100litre per batch  to 14,000to/pa continuous flow technologies. 
It is great to see how more and more Regions explore the opportunities at every scale appropriate to the local conditions and needs.
The Gippsland Climate Action Network covers a huge area with many reasons to encourage, inform, train, imagine how to restore what was lost and what needs to be done to make it another valuable  ‘Centre of Expertise’ in things renewable and sustainability.
There is lots to do and the last thing we need is to confuse the community and regulators with ‘red herrings’.
Don, if you like, watch this and see what we (incl. me and my son) have been involved with,  way back: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qwVsv5OqIg to bring about change. All a matter scale.
The process continues.
Frank again
 
  <image005.png>
 
 
 
<image006.png>
 
 
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.
 
Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don  



Re: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Frank Strie
 

One more contribution:
Just in case some have not yet had the opportunity to follow up with the recorded USBI presentations in Oct. 2020.
Considering the seriousness and urgency to move to pyrogenic carbon production on every level of
Scaling Biochar  can be shared again.
Albert Bates’s recent presentation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2B2GQ2FQmWs .
If you like the shortened  direct action part, you can go directly to the  23rd  minute where Biochar production and refining are illustrated.
This is what I like to see driving the exploration and guidelines as part of sustainable Biochar production here and around the globe.
Cheers
Frank

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Frank Strie via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 10:46 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

 

As long as people, land managers, farm and forest owners are allowed in Australia and even encouraged by State Fire Authorities to reduce  biomass fuel by setting it alight with a drip torch or Heli-torch because it is seen as best option, there is a wide ranging options to deal with small to medium scale char productions.
The organisation is not a Authority but a represents interests of its members.
As long as it is possible to go to the next Big Box Hardware chain store to get a fire bowl  that can be used for all sorts of ways, and if someone uses a fire pit method to address the various issues, needs an opportunities to make char / Pyrogenic Carbon for all sorts of things, then this reality.
‘Big Brother’ will  do what big brothers sometimes trying to do, the objective should be a better future.
So, when someone is creative and thinks about to assist and to make things happen, the last thing we need is to confuse the community.
Education, training, demonstration and conversation around the kilns do a lot to explore pathways  for a better future, be that in Tassie, VIC, WA, Qld, Spain or somewhere else. The value of the ‘Kin Tiki’ deep con kiln  and the Oregon Kiln and the many other flame curtain processes in various shapes and sizes and design features lead to education and the ability to get things done.
Balz Baur of BAZNA in Serbia is an innovative operator who utilises the thermal energy next to a shed via a smart heat exchanger.

The photos Don has shared from about 2015 if I recall have no heat & wind shield, no air injection ring tube and the emissions tests from that process next to a rubber tired platform is something not to be recommended.
I recall photos that Paul Taylor shared with me at the time of a truck load of short wood blocks / offcuts that was unloaded at the time.
This feedstock is very different to vineyard and fruit orchard and nut and olive  grove material that many use.
Over the years, our (very happy) clients around Australia TAS, VIC, WA, QLD know why they have chosen to get a KON-TIKI-TAS kiln from 300litre, 1m3 and 1,85m3 size.
2021 will be interesting and we will be exhibiting for the 6th time at Agfest in early May with anything from as little as 100litre per batch  to 14,000to/pa continuous flow technologies.
It is great to see how more and more Regions explore the opportunities at every scale appropriate to the local conditions and needs.
The Gippsland Climate Action Network covers a huge area with many reasons to encourage, inform, train, imagine how to restore what was lost and what needs to be done to make it another valuable  ‘Centre of Expertise’ in things renewable and sustainability.
There is lots to do and the last thing we need is to confuse the community and regulators with ‘red herrings’.
Don, if you like, watch this and see what we (incl. me and my son) have been involved with,  way back:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qwVsv5OqIg to bring about change. All a matter scale.

The process continues.
Frank again
 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don 


Beware of 'Red Herrings' and 'Big Brothers' ... RE: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Frank Strie
 

 

As long as people, land managers, farm and forest owners are allowed in Australia and even encouraged by State Fire Authorities to reduce  biomass fuel by setting it alight with a drip torch or Heli-torch because it is seen as best option, there is a wide ranging options to deal with small to medium scale char productions.
The organisation is not a Authority but a represents interests of its members.
As long as it is possible to go to the next Big Box Hardware chain store to get a fire bowl  that can be used for all sorts of ways, and if someone uses a fire pit method to address the various issues, needs an opportunities to make char / Pyrogenic Carbon for all sorts of things, then this reality.
‘Big Brother’ will  do what big brothers sometimes trying to do, the objective should be a better future.
So, when someone is creative and thinks about to assist and to make things happen, the last thing we need is to confuse the community.
Education, training, demonstration and conversation around the kilns do a lot to explore pathways  for a better future, be that in Tassie, VIC, WA, Qld, Spain or somewhere else. The value of the ‘Kin Tiki’ deep con kiln  and the Oregon Kiln and the many other flame curtain processes in various shapes and sizes and design features lead to education and the ability to get things done.
Balz Baur of BAZNA in Serbia is an innovative operator who utilises the thermal energy next to a shed via a smart heat exchanger.

The photos Don has shared from about 2015 if I recall have no heat & wind shield, no air injection ring tube and the emissions tests from that process next to a rubber tired platform is something not to be recommended.
I recall photos that Paul Taylor shared with me at the time of a truck load of short wood blocks / offcuts that was unloaded at the time.
This feedstock is very different to vineyard and fruit orchard and nut and olive  grove material that many use.
Over the years, our (very happy) clients around Australia TAS, VIC, WA, QLD know why they have chosen to get a KON-TIKI-TAS kiln from 300litre, 1m3 and 1,85m3 size.
2021 will be interesting and we will be exhibiting for the 6th time at Agfest in early May with anything from as little as 100litre per batch  to 14,000to/pa continuous flow technologies.
It is great to see how more and more Regions explore the opportunities at every scale appropriate to the local conditions and needs.
The Gippsland Climate Action Network covers a huge area with many reasons to encourage, inform, train, imagine how to restore what was lost and what needs to be done to make it another valuable  ‘Centre of Expertise’ in things renewable and sustainability.
There is lots to do and the last thing we need is to confuse the community and regulators with ‘red herrings’.
Don, if you like, watch this and see what we (incl. me and my son) have been involved with,  way back:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_qwVsv5OqIg to bring about change. All a matter scale.

The process continues.
Frank again
 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 8:25 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don 


Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Mike

ROI really depends on what products you make.  In Australia the best returns are from selling to horse owners see various web sites on companies selling feedchar in Australia).  Every business will need to work out markets costs and returns.  

Of course we will give an instruction manual that has lots of tips about formulations.

Regards
Stephen

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 10:18 AM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stephen,

Do you have thoughts regarding the ROI of your basic biochar system ?  I expect the ROI would be crop and/application related....

Are you making a post production cook book for users....?

Mike



Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

mikethewormguy
 

Stephen,

Do you have thoughts regarding the ROI of your basic biochar system ?  I expect the ROI would be crop and/application related....

Are you making a post production cook book for users....?

Mike



Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Stephen Joseph
 

To All

Don is correct Paul Taylor and I did emissions testing with a hooded kiln.   When operate with dry wood really low emissions and good quality biochar. My main concern with the Kontiki was the low yield and the lack of flexibility with feedstock and need to constantly add biomass.  We never got over 18%.  During our summer when temperatures get over 40 centigrade you dont need to go to a Sauna. Plus possible issues with EPA and fire authorities

The idea behind the present design is to meet both emissions standards, fire regulations, ability to use a range of feedstocks, high biochar yields controllable temperature to optimise properties,  transportable on a trailer towed by an SUV  and using the waste heat at an affordable price.  The kiln is designed to produce a single batch (about 2 cum. of biomass in) in 3 hours with a yield of 30-35% depending on feed stock.  If you add minerals (especially clay) you can get around 50% yield and activate the surface with the clay and other minerals.

My colleague and I have designed the unit so you can add a heat exchanger to use waste heat, collect wood vinegar, smoke meat and fish, can bake bread and pizzas  and dry crops with the residual heat in the bricks at the bottom. Because the design is modular you can make bigger or smaller and we can mass produce to keep cost down.  Basically allows farmer to make a good return from multi uses.

Unit 1 comes out next week and we will start to test/modify  in the next few weeks.  We are hoping to mass produce for $15,000-$20,000 Aus.

We have also designed a container unit that again will be a kit of parts.  Next years project.

Regards
Stephen


On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 8:25 AM Don Coyne <execdirect@...> wrote:
Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don 


Transporting the kiln ... RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Frank Strie
 

Re the KON-TIKI-TAS Standard size Shuttle version.
During the carbonisation process, the wheels are removed to keep the tires and the towing vehicle cool and out of fire risk zone.
The frame is lowered to the ground balanced and supported according to the terrain, so it is easy to work with, to load it.
After the quenching process  is completed, the unit is reset for the road, or the char can easily emptied into the shredder and into a storage container.
The K-T-T Shuttle is also useful when not used for char production, for example to transport other materials be that sand, compost, firewood, grain, fodder … whatever is required on a typical farm property.
Anyhow,  we also have a happy client here in Tassie who has a K-T-T Standard on a Skid and tilt frame and with the even simpler, on farm wheel assembly to be towed around with his 4WD bike.
See the image here:
https://www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products/kon-tiki-tas-deep-cone-kilns/kon-tiki-tas-standard-deep-cone-kiln
More things ahead
Frank again

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Norm Baker
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 5:26 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Dick;

 

I have no plan, just some ideas I stole from newspaper clipping. I too own a tractor with a 3-point hitch and you are correct that it would be dangerous to use the Kon-Tiki attached.

 

I can imagine that the Kon-Tiki is burned separately from the tractor where the feedstock is located. Then it is quenched and loaded with appropriate nutrients. The Kon-Tiki is mounted on a trailer arrangement of some sort, carefully balanced, and then is hooked up to the tractor, and attached to the PTO for spreading on soil. 

 

Norm


Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

Don Coyne
 

Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don 

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