Date   

Compelo: Most countries considering developing a hydrogen-based economy, says report

Kim Chaffee
 

All,
How can biochar fit into this mega-trend?
Kim

https://www.nsenergybusiness.com/features/countries-developing-hydrogen-based-economy/ <BR>You can register to the site here:https://www.nsenergybusiness.com/register


Re: Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

Frank Strie
 

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Geoff,

 

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

 

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 


 

 

 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

 

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?

Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”

This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

Australia.

 

 

On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

 

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

 

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

 

You can register at:

 

 

They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

 

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

 

- Hugh McLaughlin

 

 


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


5th ANZ Biochar Conference (ANZBC21) Calls for abstracts and early bird closes August 5

Don Coyne
 
Edited

Dear Group,

ANZBC21 will be held live at the South of Perth Yatch Club and virtually on October 5-7. We will have 10 keynote presenters and 60 concurrent presentations under the topic areas of Food, fibre and recreation, Energy, Infrastructure, Drawdown Markets and Biosphere Standards (air, water, soil, testing). All abstracts will be uploaded into our proceedings as a permanent record for stakeholders. 

Don't miss out on being a part of history and sending a message to the world that biochar is here to stay! No matter where you are in the world please submit abstracts downloaded off our conference page and register for either a live or a virtual pass by C.O.B. Thursday August 5 Aust Eastern Standard Time. 

Best Chars,

Don Coyne

Executive Director

ANZ Biochar Industry Group (ANZBIG)

Byron Eco Park – 1 Old Brunswick Rd,

Tyagarah, N.S.W. 2481

+61459175729

https://anzbig.org/ 


Re: Coco coir and biochar

mikethewormguy
 

Greta,

Have you done seed soaking ?  This is one use for kelp liquid.

my 2 cents,

Mike


Re: Coco coir and biochar

Greta Loeffelbein
 

Mike the worm guy,

I was starting tomatoes from seed, and some native wildflowers (lupine, tarweed, thistle, etc).  Their seed-leaves were normal green, but the true leaves were pale.  I fertigated them, and they gradually greened up.

I did add some kelp powder (Maxicrop) to a later batch of soil, as I think you suggested in another thread, but my hit-and-miss record-keeping doesn't show what I used it for.  ;) 

I grind the char with a hand-crank "meat grinder", so it has a lot of small chunks in it, not all reduced to powder.  I was hoping for increased drainage from the small biochar chunks, as with pumice or perlite, but maybe the powder quotient negated that.

--greta


NRCS TSP's and Changes in #biochar Certification #biochar

Lou Puls
 

Now that the application of Biochar has its own official USDA-NRCS specification, it seems to me that "Technical Service Providers" can be [already are?] certified to allow reimbursement by NRCS to ag producers for TSP services. TSPs include individuals, private businesses, American Indian tribes, nonprofit organizations, and public agencies.
Certification changes of TSP's are coming, according to the NRCS : "On August 13, TechReg will be modernized and moved to a more comprehensive NRCS Registry." ... "If you are currently a TSP, or are in the certification process, you may need to prepare for your profile to migrate into the new system. Instructions are available on the website and will be sent to you via-email."


Re: [EXTERN] [EXTERN] Re: [EXTERN] [Biochar] Biochar Sequestration - Must it be Buried

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Kim

No money and no people at present but maybe next year.
Some farmers here are trialling themselves but this isnt publishable but if they tell me the results I will pass on
Regards
Stephen

On Mon, Jul 12, 2021 at 2:56 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
Hello Stephen,
Congratulations on opening up this new area of research for biochar.  Where do you expect to focus your research next?  Do you plan to publish your work on soil drenching thru fertigation? 
Both the foliar and the soil drenching would seem to be economically attractive to farmers who want to try biochar, but are put off by the cost.  Especially organic farmers. Also, there’s a lot of chicken poop that needs to be turned into something useful.
Thanks for your pioneering work.
Kim



On Jul 11, 2021, at 6:05 PM, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Mike

yes lots more work to be done.  Most of our leafy greens are grown in greenhouses with overhead sprinklers that are operated by computer so its no a big deal to do this.

We also did soil drenching through fertigation and this also works well.  Just didnt publish this.

Regards
Stephen


On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 10:34 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stephen,

Enjoyed reading the liquid biochar/mineral complex foliar spray on lettuce article.   Though foliar spraying lettuce every 4 days within a 30 day grow cycle could be a challenge, at scale,  the results described in the article are very interesting.  There can be much benefit seen from spoon feeding your plants.

In your copious free time, it may be interesting to look at the effect of the multiple diluted sprays on the leaf surface microbial community regarding the abundance of beneficial vs not so beneficial wee beasties.

Keep up the great work !

Mike


Re: [EXTERN] [EXTERN] Re: [EXTERN] [Biochar] Biochar Sequestration - Must it be Buried

Kim Chaffee
 

Hello Stephen,
Congratulations on opening up this new area of research for biochar.  Where do you expect to focus your research next?  Do you plan to publish your work on soil drenching thru fertigation? 
Both the foliar and the soil drenching would seem to be economically attractive to farmers who want to try biochar, but are put off by the cost.  Especially organic farmers. Also, there’s a lot of chicken poop that needs to be turned into something useful.
Thanks for your pioneering work.
Kim



On Jul 11, 2021, at 6:05 PM, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Mike

yes lots more work to be done.  Most of our leafy greens are grown in greenhouses with overhead sprinklers that are operated by computer so its no a big deal to do this.

We also did soil drenching through fertigation and this also works well.  Just didnt publish this.

Regards
Stephen


On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 10:34 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stephen,

Enjoyed reading the liquid biochar/mineral complex foliar spray on lettuce article.   Though foliar spraying lettuce every 4 days within a 30 day grow cycle could be a challenge, at scale,  the results described in the article are very interesting.  There can be much benefit seen from spoon feeding your plants.

In your copious free time, it may be interesting to look at the effect of the multiple diluted sprays on the leaf surface microbial community regarding the abundance of beneficial vs not so beneficial wee beasties.

Keep up the great work !

Mike


Re: [EXTERN] [EXTERN] Re: [EXTERN] [Biochar] Biochar Sequestration - Must it be Buried

Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Mike

yes lots more work to be done.  Most of our leafy greens are grown in greenhouses with overhead sprinklers that are operated by computer so its no a big deal to do this.

We also did soil drenching through fertigation and this also works well.  Just didnt publish this.

Regards
Stephen


On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 10:34 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stephen,

Enjoyed reading the liquid biochar/mineral complex foliar spray on lettuce article.   Though foliar spraying lettuce every 4 days within a 30 day grow cycle could be a challenge, at scale,  the results described in the article are very interesting.  There can be much benefit seen from spoon feeding your plants.

In your copious free time, it may be interesting to look at the effect of the multiple diluted sprays on the leaf surface microbial community regarding the abundance of beneficial vs not so beneficial wee beasties.

Keep up the great work !

Mike


Re: Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

Dick Gallien
 

Thanks Geoff and Nando---It's an oldie from the 40's, "Seems I've heard that song before", with Harry James on trumpet. 




On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 3:28 PM Nando Breiter <nando@...> wrote:
Geoff,

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 




On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 


On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin



--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Re: Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

Nando Breiter
 

Geoff,

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 




On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 


On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin



--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Re: Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 


On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin



Re: Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

Hugh McLaughlin
 

I forgot to attach the Smolker reprint to the first email on this issue. Here it is.

Hugh McLaughlin

On Sunday, July 11, 2021, 10:54:00 AM EDT, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:


Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin


[Stoves] What do we know about kiln technology? Want to find out?/ Box-Kiln

Tom Miles
 

From Chris Adam who developed the Adam retort:

 

See the video clip on the Box-Kiln:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRRNVc3zqAU&t=79s

 

can also be searched under Youtube and "Box-kiln"

or

"Box-Kiln for improved charcoal production, Adam"

 

From: Stoves <stoves-bounces@...> On Behalf Of dr.adam
Sent: Sunday, July 11, 2021 3:44 AM
To: Discussion of biomass cooking stoves <stoves@...>
Subject: Re: [Stoves] What do we know about kiln technology? Want to find out?/ Box-Kiln

 

I recently developed this Box-kiln (Kasten-Meiler) which works quite well. It supposed to replace the ring-kilns. The main advantage is that it can be operated by one person. In contrast, a ring-kiln needs several workers to place and lift the heavy lid.

This Box-Kiln has intellectual property protection in several countries.

Chris ADAM

 

Inline image

Box-Kiln built for giz in Ghana, Mai 2021

 

 


Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

Hugh McLaughlin
 

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin


Re: pyroligneous acid observation.

mikethewormguy
 

Nando,

Yes....   I am using the soap, as a surfactant adjuvant, and not as a pest active....    Using PA and soap can work but a jar test would be good to see if they get along in a diluted state.   The soap will reflect the plant oil used to make it.   

Mike


Re: pyroligneous acid observation.

Nando Breiter
 



The challenge with the soap is that too much can dissolve the waxy coating on the plant leaf which presents a different set of issues.

Is that why you use a soap concentration of around 0.15% ?
 


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Re: pyroligneous acid observation.

mikethewormguy
 

Nando,

I started adding the diluted PA to the soap solution because I was curious.    In general, from my experience with spraying soaps and insects is to get them when they are in the soft body phase.  The soap appears to act as a carrier for the PA, and in our case, the essential oils, and improves their movement into the surface sprayed.  It gets more difficult when the insect gets a shell.

The challenge with the soap is that too much can dissolve the waxy coating on the plant leaf which presents a different set of issues.

Mike


Re: [EXTERN] [EXTERN] Re: [EXTERN] [Biochar] Biochar Sequestration - Must it be Buried

mikethewormguy
 

Stephen,

Enjoyed reading the liquid biochar/mineral complex foliar spray on lettuce article.   Though foliar spraying lettuce every 4 days within a 30 day grow cycle could be a challenge, at scale,  the results described in the article are very interesting.  There can be much benefit seen from spoon feeding your plants.

In your copious free time, it may be interesting to look at the effect of the multiple diluted sprays on the leaf surface microbial community regarding the abundance of beneficial vs not so beneficial wee beasties.

Keep up the great work !

Mike


Re: pyroligneous acid observation.

Nando Breiter
 

Mike,

I'm wondering about mixing PA and soap only, to increase PA penetration into an insect through its exoskeleton. I've read that the exoskeleton has a waxy coating, and soap dissolving this coating can lead the insect to rapidly dehydrating and perhaps dying. The thought is that if soap is used to dissolve this waxy coating, then acetic acid and phenols could more easily penetrate into the insect, severely disrupting its pH balance. In mites, I've read that this causes the internals of the insect to dissolve and leak out (which of course is not survivable, and to which an insect would not be able to genetically adapt to, unlike what we often see with chemical pesticides). 

Further, the thought is that the addition of soap might allow us to keep PA dosages low enough so that plants are not negatively impacted.



CarbonZero
+41 76 303 4477 cell / WhatsApp / Signal (https://signal.org/)


On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 1:39 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Nando,

I add the PA to the water first and stir. I  add the essential oil soap to the diluted PA solution. 

Mike


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland

581 - 600 of 30893