Topics

Biochar and Animal Health #animals #cattle #pigs #chickens


Tom Miles
 

We are hearing from Asia and Africa that biochars in bedding and feed improve the health of cattle, pigs, and chickens and are assumed to help reduce the incidence of disease. I haven’t seen papers or presentations on this topic since the Asian Pacific Biochar Conference in Kyoto, Japan, in 2011 where it was discussed in informal gatherings and a few formal presentations.  I would think this would be more likely to appear in observations of smallholder farm animals than in university studies where animals are more likely to have fewer health problems. Any information o these effects would be helpful and may direct future study.

 

Thanks

 

Tom

Tom Miles

Chair

International Biochar Initiative

Biochar-international.org

 


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Tom
Genxing has published the results in Chinese journal.

I have the paper somewhere and will send it through.  Here is a summary

There is good papers from the group at central Queensland University

Biochar, zeolite and bentonite feed supplements influence broiler growth and

meat yield and excreta properties

Die Futterzusatzstoffe Biochar, Zeolit und Bentonit beeinflussen das Wachstum, den

Fleischanteil und die Ausscheidungen von Broilern

T.P. Prasai, K.B. Walsh, D.J. Midmore and S.P. Bhattarai*


Regards
Stephen

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 2:06 PM tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

We are hearing from Asia and Africa that biochars in bedding and feed improve the health of cattle, pigs, and chickens and are assumed to help reduce the incidence of disease. I haven’t seen papers or presentations on this topic since the Asian Pacific Biochar Conference in Kyoto, Japan, in 2011 where it was discussed in informal gatherings and a few formal presentations.  I would think this would be more likely to appear in observations of smallholder farm animals than in university studies where animals are more likely to have fewer health problems. Any information o these effects would be helpful and may direct future study.

 

Thanks

 

Tom

Tom Miles

Chair

International Biochar Initiative

Biochar-international.org

 


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Tom,

No scientific data to provide, but the veterinarian we are working with in Malawi reports that cows fed biochar regularly get sick less often and yield 15 liters of milk daily, up from 8 (a function, I suspect, of being healthier).

I have also been told on multiple occasions by Malawi team members that chickens, cows, goats, pigs, quails and rabbits all appear healthier with biochar feed supplements.

Recently, I received word from our project leader that an unknown, intestinal illness was killing chickens. Apparently, some woman fed her chickens biochar and they got better. Now everyone is feeding their chickens biochar 

Needless to say, all this is not only anecdotal, but also second hand. It does suggest, however, that some applied, field research might be very valuable. If testing showed that basic, home made, crop waste biochar is as effective as reported, then it would make a huge difference for millions of poor families unlikely to have access to better any time soon. This is the sort of thing that traveling vets can teach and can be taught in basic vocational training programs for vets and ag extension agents.

Note, with all due respect, that what will matter to the millions is immediate applicability and the dissemination of the findings to the lowest ranks where face to face knowledge exchange takes place.

M


On Sun, Sep 8, 2019, 11:06 AM tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

We are hearing from Asia and Africa that biochars in bedding and feed improve the health of cattle, pigs, and chickens and are assumed to help reduce the incidence of disease. I haven’t seen papers or presentations on this topic since the Asian Pacific Biochar Conference in Kyoto, Japan, in 2011 where it was discussed in informal gatherings and a few formal presentations.  I would think this would be more likely to appear in observations of smallholder farm animals than in university studies where animals are more likely to have fewer health problems. Any information o these effects would be helpful and may direct future study.

 

Thanks

 

Tom

Tom Miles

Chair

International Biochar Initiative

Biochar-international.org

 


Tom Miles
 

Stephen,

 

Many thanks for the summary and citation. We look forward to Genxing’s paper

 

Broiler growers in the US are consumed with the feed/gain ratio and concerned that additives like biochar or minerals would reduce intake. Improvement in health and even a marginal improvement in feed conversion should be convincing. Many of the growers here follow the lead of the processors (integrators) they sell to which all have staff animal nutritionists who have to be convinced.

 

Tom

 

From: biochar@... Sent: Saturday, September 07, 2019 9:34 PM
To: biochar
Subject: Re: [biochar] Biochar and Animal Health

 

 

Hi Tom

Genxing has published the results in Chinese journal.

 

I have the paper somewhere and will send it through.  Here is a summary

 

There is good papers from the group at central Queensland University

 

Biochar, zeolite and bentonite feed supplements influence broiler growth and

meat yield and excreta properties

Die Futterzusatzstoffe Biochar, Zeolit und Bentonit beeinflussen das Wachstum, den

Fleischanteil und die Ausscheidungen von Broilern

T.P. Prasai, K.B. Walsh, D.J. Midmore and S.P. Bhattarai*

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 2:06 PM tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 

We are hearing from Asia and Africa that biochars in bedding and feed improve the health of cattle, pigs, and chickens and are assumed to help reduce the incidence of disease. I haven’t seen papers or presentations on this topic since the Asian Pacific Biochar Conference in Kyoto, Japan, in 2011 where it was discussed in informal gatherings and a few formal presentations.  I would think this would be more likely to appear in observations of smallholder farm animals than in university studies where animals are more likely to have fewer health problems. Any information o these effects would be helpful and may direct future study.

 

Thanks

 

Tom

Tom Miles

Chair

International Biochar Initiative

Biochar-international.org

 


Tom Miles
 

We understand that biochar meeting the European Biochar Feed standard is being fed to chickens in Europe. Feeding biochar reportedly reduces the veterinarian expenses by several thousand euros each year. This is likely occurring in Germany and Austria.

 

Tom

 

From: biochar@...
Sent: Saturday, September 07, 2019 10:18 PM
To: biochar
Subject: Re: [biochar] Biochar and Animal Health

 

 

Tom,

 

No scientific data to provide, but the veterinarian we are working with in Malawi reports that cows fed biochar regularly get sick less often and yield 15 liters of milk daily, up from 8 (a function, I suspect, of being healthier).

 

I have also been told on multiple occasions by Malawi team members that chickens, cows, goats, pigs, quails and rabbits all appear healthier with biochar feed supplements.

 

Recently, I received word from our project leader that an unknown, intestinal illness was killing chickens. Apparently, some woman fed her chickens biochar and they got better. Now everyone is feeding their chickens biochar 

 

Needless to say, all this is not only anecdotal, but also second hand. It does suggest, however, that some applied, field research might be very valuable. If testing showed that basic, home made, crop waste biochar is as effective as reported, then it would make a huge difference for millions of poor families unlikely to have access to better any time soon. This is the sort of thing that traveling vets can teach and can be taught in basic vocational training programs for vets and ag extension agents.

 

Note, with all due respect, that what will matter to the millions is immediate applicability and the dissemination of the findings to the lowest ranks where face to face knowledge exchange takes place.

 

M

 

 

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019, 11:06 AM tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 

We are hearing from Asia and Africa that biochars in bedding and feed improve the health of cattle, pigs, and chickens and are assumed to help reduce the incidence of disease. I haven’t seen papers or presentations on this topic since the Asian Pacific Biochar Conference in Kyoto, Japan, in 2011 where it was discussed in informal gatherings and a few formal presentations.  I would think this would be more likely to appear in observations of smallholder farm animals than in university studies where animals are more likely to have fewer health problems. Any information o these effects would be helpful and may direct future study.

 

Thanks

 

Tom

Tom Miles

Chair

International Biochar Initiative

Biochar-international.org