Topics

Waste Transformation - Closed Loop Farming #closedloop


Tom Miles
 

From Paul Olivier:

 

I would like to share a presentation I gave last week at the University of Can Tho in the Mekong:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wagfgor7gmfgupl/Waste%20Transformation%20Closed%20Loop%20Farming.pdf?dl=0

 

Many thanks.

Paul


--

Paul A. Olivier PhD
27/2bis Phu Dong Thien Vuong
Dalat
Vietnam

Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
Mobile: 090-694-1573 (in Vietnam)
Skype address: Xpolivier
http://epwt.vn/en/home/

 


Kim Chaffee
 

Paul,

What a tour de force for waste management!  You have done an amazing job of analyzing the optimal ways to process so many kinds of wastes and transform them into useful products.  As you say, closed loop.  Plus your slides are so well designed. Congratulations and thanks for sharing them with us.  

Kim

  

On Sep 24, 2019, at 11:27 AM, tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:


From Paul Olivier: 

 

I would like to share a presentation I gave last week at the University of Can Tho in the Mekong:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wagfgor7gmfgupl/Waste%20Transformation%20Closed%20Loop%20Farming.pdf?dl=0

 

Many thanks.

Paul


-- 

Paul A. Olivier PhD
27/2bis Phu Dong Thien Vuong
Dalat
Vietnam

Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
Mobile: 090-694-1573 (in Vietnam)
Skype address: Xpolivier
http://epwt.vn/en/home/

 




winter.julien
 

Hi All;

As a soil scientist, I can say that Paul has done some excellent work toward closing the loop in plant nutrient recycling.

However, the loop is not necessarily closed in a broader sense, because of the metal and concrete involved.  This is a common problem with 'improved' technologies compared to traditional, low-technology methods.  There is similar problem with the Akha TLUD stove in Bangladesh.  The traditional stove is made of local materials and costs nothing to build.  The Akha is made of concrete and metal.  There are HUGE benefits to using the TLUD in terms of low smoke emissions, and biochar enhanced waste management and soil productivity (were land is being lost to rising seas).   When women accept a TLUD stove, there is much to be gained, but they also make a sacrifice: they give up self-reliance.

Unfortunately, the business model for selling improved stoves and spare parts is a bit like the 'razor blade' business model.  The razor blade handle commits its owner to buying new blades; similarly using an improved stove commits the owner to buying spare metal and concrete parts as they ware out.  It is important to try to minimize this dependency when designing technologies when one's potential market is 25 million households, and where metal is expensive, because it has to be imported into the country.  If the metal and concrete industries, and recycling, are contained within the country, and are self-sustaining, then this would not be as much a problem (because it creates more economic activity within the local economy.)  If for some reason, there was a disruption in the supply of metal, then the TLUD system in Bangladesh, as currently proposed, would cease, and people would be back to using their traditional stoves.  Sustainability in this case will depend on improved trade between the countryside and city, and on foreign trade being an important component of the national GDP.

So, when one talks of closing loops in a broad sense, it depends on the geographic scale being considered, goods and services crossing system boundaries, and the kind of energy and materials needed to keep the system going. 

Cheers,
Julien.


mikethewormguy
 

paul,

one of the values of your work is to adopt residue transformation as a way of life.

we accept that no loop is fully closed and that there is leakage.  in this way, close enough is good enough and does not need to be exactly right.

keep transforming residue into opportunities......

my 2cents,

mike






Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


Norm Baker
 

Paul;

Well done, Paul. Very well done. Pleased and impressed. Closed nutrient recycling loops for both plants and animals are critical to pollution solutions and real sustainability. And I really like the self-reliance of the system presented here.

From my research, the quality of food produced from such a system is astonishingly good. We have also been creating closed loop systems here at our home on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington. Eating at home is a joy. We trade eggs or vegies or meat with neighbors for a broader diet and we often share across the dinner table. Different cultivars of vegetables of the same vegetable from organic seed suppliers or local organic suppliers actually have a distinctly unique and different taste. If we travel and eat corporate produced food, we cannot believe how tasteless and bland it can be, not to mention loaded with salt, sugar, oil or spices just to give it some kind of flavor and taste. If traveling and we buy food, it is at a farmers market if at all possible.

Unfortunately, I feel it is not possible for mankind to be totally self-reliant and have the quality of life available to us all, and Paul, in the developed world. For the future, I tend to view the quality of life, after the kind of closed loop self-sufficiency Paul has developed for the home front, as medical care, some sort of medicare for all people, energy efficiency, efficient resource use by corporate entities, technological research and development, community involvement and cooperation and a whole host of other additional things I have not thought of yet. All of you feel free to add to the list of truly democratic and sustainable goals the developed world should attain. As it is, there is just so much inertia in the developed world "business as usual" scenario.

Clearly, individual households need to be as self-reliant and self sufficient as possible if for nothing else than making themselves sustainable and environmentally sensitive as well as keeping the cost of living affordable. I cannot agree enough with Paul's goals and vision here.

But we also need political leadership to set policies that truly reflect the needs of the people and not the profit motive so overwhelmingly prevalent in today's corporate culture and capitalist (and not quite truly democratic) societies. As long as corporate feels that buying a politician's election with money is the most cost effective way to influence almost all policy decisions governing nations, the developed world will continue doing "business as usual" and suffer the consequences.  And our environment and biodiversity and ecosystem function, and ultimately all people in the developed world will continue, not begin to have, but continue to have all the consequences we see happening now because of "business as usual". We, i.e. both the self-reliant homestead of the future and the people in the business world all have a stake in our future. We must create the kind of world that has a future worth living without all the constant ecological trade-offs and policy failures we see happening now.

Yes, I know this topic of off list. So what.

Norm


David Yarrow
 

nick, take a look at this 72-slide .pdf presentation (15mb):

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wagfgor7gmfgupl/Waste%20Transformation%20Closed%20Loop%20Farming.pdf?dl=0 

a few slides must be slowly read; most are quickly scanned large-size graphics
lots of advanced, innovative ideas & illustrations.
generally wholistic thinking, 
but targeted for southeast asia, not heartland america.
especially #16 on biochar 
#17-25: biomass gasifier advanced designs
(still designing single burners, not a full-function kitchen stove)
#48-53:  enlightened swine production
for a green & peaceful planet,
david yarrow


On Tue, Sep 24, 2019 at 10:34 AM tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

From Paul Olivier:

 

I would like to share a presentation I gave last week at the University of Can Tho in the Mekong:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wagfgor7gmfgupl/Waste%20Transformation%20Closed%20Loop%20Farming.pdf?dl=0

 

Many thanks.

Paul


--

Paul A. Olivier PhD
27/2bis Phu Dong Thien Vuong
Dalat
Vietnam

Louisiana telephone: 1-337-447-4124 (rings Vietnam)
Mobile: 090-694-1573 (in Vietnam)
Skype address: Xpolivier
http://epwt.vn/en/home/