Topics

How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times #wine


Kim Chaffee
 

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?
Kim


From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


Tom Miles
 

We are on it!

Several vineyards started using biochar amended compost during drought years. They continue to top dress biochar and new vineyards inquire about biochar all the time. 

There is ongoing research with biochar. Good results with biochar and cover crops are reported in California. 

Tom

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

On Oct 17, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@... [biochar] wrote:

  

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?
Kim

>From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


Rick Wilson
 

Kim,
I'm not so sure that biochar is suitable for wine grapes, certainly at least premium grapes.  Or any fruiting plant for that matter. 

Consider what biochar does in the soil.  It facilitates nitrogen cycling. That means it produces nitrates, continuously, which stimulates plant growth.  Stimulating vine growth is not how you produce premium wines, that is why you prune, to avoid the plant from taking nutrients from the fruit.  You want fruit, not vines.  Biochar is indiscriminate producer of nitrates, you can't turn it off or on. 

To get the best performance from a fruiting plant you "juice" it with nitrogen during flowering and fruit production, and starve it otherwise.  Common practice.

Rick Wilson



On Thursday, October 17, 2019, 04:16:23 PM PDT, Tom Miles tmiles@... [biochar] wrote:


 

We are on it!

Several vineyards started using biochar amended compost during drought years. They continue to top dress biochar and new vineyards inquire about biochar all the time. 

There is ongoing research with biochar. Good results with biochar and cover crops are reported in California. 

Tom

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

On Oct 17, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@... [biochar] wrote:

  

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?
Kim

>From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

There a several published studies on grapes

 

Here in Italy a long term study, application in 2009, on a difficult soil

 

After 10 years they (CNR Italian National Research Council) still record double digit positive results

 

Tomaso

 

Da: biochar@...
Inviato: venerdì 18 ottobre 2019 06:21
A: biochar@...
Cc: Michael Maguire ; Martin Twer ; Rock Dust Local ; rob@...; Carille Ribley
Oggetto: Re: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

 

Kim,

I'm not so sure that biochar is suitable for wine grapes, certainly at least premium grapes.  Or any fruiting plant for that matter. 

 

Consider what biochar does in the soil.  It facilitates nitrogen cycling. That means it produces nitrates, continuously, which stimulates plant growth.  Stimulating vine growth is not how you produce premium wines, that is why you prune, to avoid the plant from taking nutrients from the fruit.  You want fruit, not vines.  Biochar is indiscriminate producer of nitrates, you can't turn it off or on. 

 

To get the best performance from a fruiting plant you "juice" it with nitrogen during flowering and fruit production, and starve it otherwise.  Common practice..

 

Rick Wilson

 

 

 

On Thursday, October 17, 2019, 04:16:23 PM PDT, Tom Miles tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 

 

 

We are on it!

 

Several vineyards started using biochar amended compost during drought years. They continue to top dress biochar and new vineyards inquire about biochar all the time. 

 

There is ongoing research with biochar. Good results with biochar and cover crops are reported in California. 

 

Tom

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.

Sent from mobile. 



On Oct 17, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

  

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?
Kim

>From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


Paul S Anderson
 

Rick,

 

I do not know any of this, but I can ask a question:

 

Instead of:  ….you "juice" it with nitrogen during flowering and fruit production, and starve it otherwise.  

 

What about:   ….  The plant gets the extra nitrogen in all the months from the benefits of the biochar (and the vines grow more.)    And maybe there would be a few extra inches of vine to cut (or maybe do two cuttings which would add some expense.)   But that would be without the expense of “juicing it” which be the cost of adding nitrogen fertilizer that does not have the multi-decade advantages of biochar.   

 

I will never know unless someone tells me, and they will not know until someone has done it scientifically.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile: 309-531-4434

Website:   www.drtlud.com

 

From: biochar@... <biochar@...>
Sent: Thursday, October 17, 2019 11:21 PM
To: biochar@...
Cc: Michael Maguire <Michael.Maguire@...>; Martin Twer <martin@...>; Rock Dust Local <stones32@...>; rob@...; Carille Ribley <carillegr@...>
Subject: Re: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Kim,

I'm not so sure that biochar is suitable for wine grapes, certainly at least premium grapes.  Or any fruiting plant for that matter. 

 

Consider what biochar does in the soil.  It facilitates nitrogen cycling. That means it produces nitrates, continuously, which stimulates plant growth.  Stimulating vine growth is not how you produce premium wines, that is why you prune, to avoid the plant from taking nutrients from the fruit.  You want fruit, not vines.  Biochar is indiscriminate producer of nitrates, you can't turn it off or on. 

 

To get the best performance from a fruiting plant you "juice" it with nitrogen during flowering and fruit production, and starve it otherwise.  Common practice..

 

Rick Wilson

 

 

 

On Thursday, October 17, 2019, 04:16:23 PM PDT, Tom Miles tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 

 

 

We are on it!

 

Several vineyards started using biochar amended compost during drought years. They continue to top dress biochar and new vineyards inquire about biochar all the time. 

 

There is ongoing research with biochar. Good results with biochar and cover crops are reported in California. 

 

Tom

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.

Sent from mobile. 



On Oct 17, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

  

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?
Kim

>From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


mikethewormguy
 

kim,

from my own viticulture experience, I could see biomass char being used in planting out the vines, growing them out, and tucking them in for the winter sleep...

my 2 cents....

mike..





Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


Kevin Chisholm
 

Hi Kim

 

From: biochar@... [mailto:biochar@...]
Sent: October 17, 2019 7:30 PM
To: Biochar@...
Cc: Michael Maguire ; Martin Twer ; Rock Dust Local ; rob@...; Carille Ribley
Subject: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

 

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

# Agreed!! “High Value Crops” have the greatest potential to yield larger savings, to pay for the cost of biochar additions.


Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?

# Biochar is not a panacea. However, it can indeed yield a benefit if it amelioriates or improves upon a “Soil System Deficiency”. I would suggest a “Three Step Process”, to maximize the benefits of biochar additions, as follows:

#1: Analyse the soil system in relation to the crop being grown, and determine which factors are “sub-optimal”.

#2: Search for, and find, a biochar, or a mixture of biochars, that address the identified “soil system deficiencies”, without “de-optomising” other soil system properties. (eg, One would not want to add a biochar with “high liming properties” to a soil system that was already optomised in this regard.)

#3: Apply the biochar, or biochar mix.

# Basically, “Biochar additions will give the greatest benefit, when they brings to the soil system that which it needs most.”

Best wishes,

Kevin


Kim

From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Wine makers will want to add a final step.  They will want to check how biochar might affect taste.  A few years ago when trying to reduce fertilizer consumption in Thailand 's large tobacco industry,  we came acropper when the head agronomist declared that flavor would go to hell. As a nonsmoker,  I didn't have a qualified opinion on the subject,  but the experience has made me extremely careful when dealing with the producers of crops valued/priced by professionals. 

M


On Sun, Oct 20, 2019, 11:39 AM 'kchisholm' kchisholm@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

Hi Kim

 

From: biochar@... [mailto:biochar@...]
Sent: October 17, 2019 7:30 PM
To: Biochar@Yahoogroups..com
Cc: Michael Maguire <Michael.Maguire@...>; Martin Twer <martin@...>; Rock Dust Local <stones32@...>; rob@...; Carille Ribley <carillegr@...>
Subject: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

 

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

# Agreed!! “High Value Crops” have the greatest potential to yield larger savings, to pay for the cost of biochar additions.


Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?

# Biochar is not a panacea. However, it can indeed yield a benefit if it amelioriates or improves upon a “Soil System Deficiency”. I would suggest a “Three Step Process”, to maximize the benefits of biochar additions, as follows:

#1: Analyse the soil system in relation to the crop being grown, and determine which factors are “sub-optimal”.

#2: Search for, and find, a biochar, or a mixture of biochars, that address the identified “soil system deficiencies”, without “de-optomising” other soil system properties. (eg, One would not want to add a biochar with “high liming properties” to a soil system that was already optomised in this regard.)

#3: Apply the biochar, or biochar mix.

# Basically, “Biochar additions will give the greatest benefit, when they brings to the soil system that which it needs most.”

Best wishes,

Kevin


Kim

From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes..com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


Rick Wilson
 

In wine making the quality of grapes is everything to the economics of the process. Stressing vines is known to produce higher quality grapes and more valuable wine, drought for instance. So adding biochar to thwart off the effects of drought may not be the right thing to do if you are in business to make money. 

I agree that adding biochar probably helps develop the soil microbiome, which enables antagonistic elements to fight back pathogens. If that is a problem for you. 

The nutrient dynamics are complex.  My point (as widely accepted by fruit growers in California) is that adding more nutrients all the time the way biochar can may not be the best thing for the economic outcome, which includes quality.

And if you add biochar to the soil in a vineyard, it is going to take you a long time, many years, before you even begin to get an idea what the impact was.  

It's not clear to me that wine making is where you want to put your commercial efforts to develop a market for your biochar.

Canning tomatoes yes.  

Salad tomatoes, possibly, possibly not.  Premium value is paid for the right size and shape. Taste, Brix, acidity, mostly not important (although they should be).  What is the impact of biochar added to the soil?  At least you can find out what happens quickly, unlike wine making.  

There is a reason biochar has not taken off.  Commercial high-value agriculture is much more complex that just yields.  

Rick Wilson


On Friday, October 18, 2019, 01:48:00 AM EDT, tomaso.bertoli@... [biochar] wrote:


 

There a several published studies on grapes

 

Here in Italy a long term study, application in 2009, on a difficult soil

 

After 10 years they (CNR Italian National Research Council) still record double digit positive results

 

Tomaso

 

Da: biochar@...
Inviato: venerdì 18 ottobre 2019 06:21
A: biochar@...
Cc: Michael Maguire ; Rock Dust Local <stones32@...>; rob@...; Carille Ribley
Oggetto: Re: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

 

Kim,

I'm not so sure that biochar is suitable for wine grapes, certainly at least premium grapes.  Or any fruiting plant for that matter. 

 

Consider what biochar does in the soil.  It facilitates nitrogen cycling. That means it produces nitrates, continuously, which stimulates plant growth.  Stimulating vine growth is not how you produce premium wines, that is why you prune, to avoid the plant from taking nutrients from the fruit.  You want fruit, not vines.  Biochar is indiscriminate producer of nitrates, you can't turn it off or on. 

 

To get the best performance from a fruiting plant you "juice" it with nitrogen during flowering and fruit production, and starve it otherwise.  Common practice..

 

Rick Wilson

 

 

 

On Thursday, October 17, 2019, 04:16:23 PM PDT, Tom Miles tmiles@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

 

 

 

We are on it!

 

Several vineyards started using biochar amended compost during drought years. They continue to top dress biochar and new vineyards inquire about biochar all the time. 

 

There is ongoing research with biochar. Good results with biochar and cover crops are reported in California. 

 

Tom

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.

Sent from mobile. 



On Oct 17, 2019, at 3:29 PM, Kim Chaffee kim.chaffee2@gmail..com [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:

  

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?
Kim

>From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

correct observation

I have read two studies 


wine quality improves 

10 year CNR Ibimet study on the Antinori Braccesca vineyard

wine quality unaffected while quantity improves double digit

you might want to read also


Il Mer 23 Ott 2019, 03:47 'd.michael.shafer@...' d.michael.shafer@... [biochar] <biochar@...> ha scritto:
 

Wine makers will want to add a final step.  They will want to check how biochar might affect taste.  A few years ago when trying to reduce fertilizer consumption in Thailand 's large tobacco industry,  we came acropper when the head agronomist declared that flavor would go to hell. As a nonsmoker,  I didn't have a qualified opinion on the subject,  but the experience has made me extremely careful when dealing with the producers of crops valued/priced by professionals. 

M


On Sun, Oct 20, 2019, 11:39 AM 'kchisholm' kchisholm@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

Hi Kim

 

From: biochar@... [mailto:biochar@...]
Sent: October 17, 2019 7:30 PM
To: Biochar@Yahoogroups...com
Cc: Michael Maguire <Michael.Maguire@...>; Martin Twer <martin@...>; Rock Dust Local <stones32@...>; rob@...; Carille Ribley <carillegr@...>
Subject: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

 

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

# Agreed!! “High Value Crops” have the greatest potential to yield larger savings, to pay for the cost of biochar additions.


Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?

# Biochar is not a panacea. However, it can indeed yield a benefit if it amelioriates or improves upon a “Soil System Deficiency”. I would suggest a “Three Step Process”, to maximize the benefits of biochar additions, as follows:

#1: Analyse the soil system in relation to the crop being grown, and determine which factors are “sub-optimal”.

#2: Search for, and find, a biochar, or a mixture of biochars, that address the identified “soil system deficiencies”, without “de-optomising” other soil system properties. (eg, One would not want to add a biochar with “high liming properties” to a soil system that was already optomised in this regard.)

#3: Apply the biochar, or biochar mix.

# Basically, “Biochar additions will give the greatest benefit, when they brings to the soil system that which it needs most.”

Best wishes,

Kevin


Kim

From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes..com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html


roland@...
 

Please ask in Europe, where you will find decades of experience
(about a wine maker, who is using biochar, in a fictional movie in TV)

Es ergab sich ein Kontakt zum Ithaka-Institut in der Schweiz, das ja seine Wurzeln im Weinbau hat.

Das Material für die Biokohle kommt aus dem eigenen Betrieb, denn es fallen jedes Jahr genügen alte Rebstöcke an.



---In biochar@..., <d.michael.shafer@...> wrote :

Wine makers will want to add a final step.  They will want to check how biochar might affect taste. 




Rick Wilson
 

Thanks Tomaso, Roland.  Rick

On Wednesday, October 23, 2019, 10:53:05 AM EDT, roland@... [biochar] wrote:


 

Please ask in Europe, where you will find decades of experience
(about a wine maker, who is using biochar, in a fictional movie in TV)

Es ergab sich ein Kontakt zum Ithaka-Institut in der Schweiz, das ja seine Wurzeln im Weinbau hat.

Das Material für die Biokohle kommt aus dem eigenen Betrieb, denn es fallen jedes Jahr genügen alte Rebstöcke an.



---In biochar@..., wrote :

Wine makers will want to add a final step.  They will want to check how biochar might affect taste. 




Rick Wilson
 

Paul, I am representing widely held beliefs and practices for what  is considered high performance farming using fertilizers.  This would include crops like bell peppers.  

On Sunday, October 20, 2019, 11:39:47 AM EDT, 'kchisholm' kchisholm@... [biochar] wrote:


 

Hi Kim

 

From: biochar@... [mailto:biochar@...]
Sent: October 17, 2019 7:30 PM
To: Biochar@Yahoogroups..com
Cc: Michael Maguire ; Martin Twer ; Rock Dust Local ; rob@...; Carille Ribley
Subject: [biochar] How Climate Change Impacts Wine: NY Times

 

 

My feeling is that biochar’s best chance to make inroads into the agricultural sector is with high value crops like wine grapes.

# Agreed!! “High Value Crops” have the greatest potential to yield larger savings, to pay for the cost of biochar additions.


Climate change, as this article shows, is resulting in several factors that should promote biochar’s use in the the wine industry: improved resistance to drought and deluge, pests and diseases. Plus, improvement of poor soils in new locations where the warming climate is causing vineyards to move to. Your thoughts?

# Biochar is not a panacea. However, it can indeed yield a benefit if it amelioriates or improves upon a “Soil System Deficiency”. I would suggest a “Three Step Process”, to maximize the benefits of biochar additions, as follows:

#1: Analyse the soil system in relation to the crop being grown, and determine which factors are “sub-optimal”.

#2: Search for, and find, a biochar, or a mixture of biochars, that address the identified “soil system deficiencies”, without “de-optomising” other soil system properties. (eg, One would not want to add a biochar with “high liming properties” to a soil system that was already optomised in this regard.)

#3: Apply the biochar, or biochar mix.

# Basically, “Biochar additions will give the greatest benefit, when they brings to the soil system that which it needs most.”

Best wishes,

Kevin


Kim

From The New York Times:

How Climate Change Impacts Wine

The accelerating effects of climate change have forced the wine industry to take decisive steps to counter or adapt to the shifts.

https://www.nytimes..com/interactive/2019/10/14/dining/drinks/climate-change-wine.html