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BIOmass CHAR...... #feedstock


mikethewormguy
 

curious to know how many folks are using wheat straw char, bone char, wood char, and other biomass chars....

wood char is only one type of char.......



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d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

At Warm Heart we use no forest wood.  Our primary feedstocks are corn stalk,  corncob and rice straw. We also char branches pruned by orchard owners that would otherwise be burned.  In Africa,  our feedstocks are millet and corn stalk,  and corncob. 

M


On Thu, Oct 24, 2019, 1:56 AM mikethewormguy mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:
 

curious to know how many folks are using wheat straw char, bone char, wood char, and other biomass chars....

wood char is only one type of char.......



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Gordon West
 

We are using pecan shells, wood chips, and most recently pelletized juniper slash. One of our main objectives is to utilize waste from thinning and fuels reduction projects - the kind of material that is burning in California right now, for instance.

Gordon West
The Trollworks
503 N. “E” Street
Silver City, NM 88061
575-537-3689

An entrepreneur sees problems as the seeds of opportunity.





On Oct 23, 2019, at 5:09 PM, mikethewormguy mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:


curious to know how many folks are using wheat straw char, bone char, wood char, and other biomass chars....

wood char is only one type of char.......



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mikethewormguy
 

gordon,

are you doing the pelleting.. ?

mike



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Gordon West
 

Mike,

Yes, we bought a 15HP Chinese pellet machine and are using a 3/8” die. The main objective was to pelletize thinning slash, which is otherwise of negative value, and create a densified storable, transportable feedstock for building heating and process heat (char making co-product). Normally slash is too low in bulk density and consistency to be worth messing with. The first run of juniper slash pellets are fairly low density (25#/cf) but they are holding together well. I think the moisture content was a bit high and we expect to get to 35# at lower MC, which will be fine. I’m told by a “real" pellet guy that we’ll save electricity and the dies will last longer at 35# rather than 40# (the normal pellet stove density). 

These pellets would not be good for ordinary pellet stoves because they are “dirty”. But we want them to be used to make char, so not a problem.

Gordon 




On Oct 31, 2019, at 7:13 AM, mikethewormguy mikethewormguy@... [biochar] <biochar@...> wrote:


gordon,

are you doing the pelleting.. ?

mike



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mikethewormguy
 

gordon,

some of the attributes that we like from charred hard wood pellets include the physical stability, microbial growth substrate, ease of spreading, and it's shape.

we have used a blend of microbially enriched (ME) charred wood pellets and pelleted chicken compost, as well as, a blend of ME charred wood pellets and pelletized spent mushroom substrate/char powder, as soil additives, for our veggee production which resulted in a statistically significant number of yums from those who ate the harvest......

let us know how we can be of service......

mike





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