Bio-char stoves #stoves


Tom Miles
 

Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves



Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,

Kevin

Head Gardener

Inverewe

Poolwew

Achnasheen

Ross-shire

IV22 2LD

 

 




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Hugh McLaughlin
 

I expect that contacting the UK Biochar Research Center in Edinburgh https://www.biochar.ac.uk/ would be the logical next step. Probably a bus ride away to interface with Europe's leading scientists would be worth it.

- Hugh

On Monday, November 25, 2019, 11:58:59 AM EST, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:


Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves



Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,

Kevin

Head Gardener

Inverewe

Poolwew

Achnasheen

Ross-shire

IV22 2LD

 

 


----------
Central Office in Edinburgh 

Hermiston Quay
5 Cultins Road
Edinburgh
EH11 4DF

The National Trust for Scotland for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty is a charity registered in Scotland, Charity Number SC007410

The contents of this e-mail are confidential to the intended recipient at the e-mail address to which it has been addressed. It may not be disclosed to or used by anyone other than this addressee nor may it be copied in any way. If received in error please notify us immediately by telephone and delete the e-mail. Neither The National Trust for Scotland nor the sender accepts any liability or responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan attachments (if any). Any views or other information in this e-mail which do not relate to our business are not authorised by us.  This e-mail does not form part of any contract unless so stated.

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Paul S Anderson
 

I will write to Kevin about the 4C kilns.  The best released info about 4C kilns is at   www.woodgas.com/resources  (see presentation on   “Farm-scale Char Production”.   I am improving it, but that info is still largely private, and I am working with some private test sites.   Scotland would be a good addition.

 

Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?

 

Paul   

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 10:59 AM
To: biochar@groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.

Sent from mobile. 


Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves



Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,

Kevin

Head Gardener

Inverewe

Poolwew

Achnasheen

Ross-shire

IV22 2LD

 

 

 
 
 
 
----------
Central Office in Edinburgh 
 
Hermiston Quay
5 Cultins Road
Edinburgh
EH11 4DF
 
The National Trust for Scotland for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty is a charity registered in Scotland, Charity Number SC007410
 
The contents of this e-mail are confidential to the intended recipient at the e-mail address to which it has been addressed. It may not be disclosed to or used by anyone other than this addressee nor may it be copied in any way. If received in error please notify us immediately by telephone and delete the e-mail. Neither The National Trust for Scotland nor the sender accepts any liability or responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan attachments (if any). Any views or other information in this e-mail which do not relate to our business are not authorised by us.  This e-mail does not form part of any contract unless so stated.
 
----------


Kim LaDuke
 

Kevin:
Years ago I read about Carbon Gold, it seemed they were developing the burners in Edinburgh.
It seems that company moved to Bristol, England and they are selling inoculated biochar.
Kim


From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 11:58 AM
To: biochar@groups.io <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves
 
Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
tmiles@...
Sent from mobile. 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves



Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,

Kevin

Head Gardener

Inverewe

Poolwew

Achnasheen

Ross-shire

IV22 2LD

 

 


----------
Central Office in Edinburgh 

Hermiston Quay
5 Cultins Road
Edinburgh
EH11 4DF

The National Trust for Scotland for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty is a charity registered in Scotland, Charity Number SC007410

The contents of this e-mail are confidential to the intended recipient at the e-mail address to which it has been addressed. It may not be disclosed to or used by anyone other than this addressee nor may it be copied in any way. If received in error please notify us immediately by telephone and delete the e-mail. Neither The National Trust for Scotland nor the sender accepts any liability or responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan attachments (if any). Any views or other information in this e-mail which do not relate to our business are not authorised by us.  This e-mail does not form part of any contract unless so stated.

----------


Nadav Ziv
 

Dear Paul,
You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.
And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...
Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.
Nadav.


Kevin Chisholm
 

Hi Nadav

 

Very interesting! Should one consider that there might be “2 kinds of pH”, as follows:

1: “Temporary pH change”: This is a temporary pH lowering effect caused by pyroligneous acids that are dissipated by oxidation or biological soil activity.

and:

2: “Permanent pH change”: This is the pH raising effect caused by the alkaline materials in the ash components of the biochar.

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: Biochar@groups.io [mailto:Biochar@groups.io] On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv
Sent: November 25, 2019 11:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.


Geoff Thomas
 

One can reduce acidity, for example by applying lime, etc, or increase acidity with Ferrous sulphide, etc, but the real clue is in increasing the Biology under the soil, eg this talk from Dr Elaine Ingham ends up talking about different PH in different parts of the garden, - perhaps implying that the soil biology changes the PH to suit a particular spot.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2H60ritjag  
As Biochar is a superior innoculant, - if done properly, it seems that once you build up the Biology enough, you don’t need to worry  about PH so much, although, as the Gardener, you can always help.

Geoff.

On 26 Nov 2019, at 4:31 am, Kim LaDuke <kim_laduke@...> wrote:

Kevin:
Years ago I read about Carbon Gold, it seemed they were developing the burners in Edinburgh.
It seems that company moved to Bristol, England and they are selling inoculated biochar.
Kim

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 11:58 AM
To: biochar@groups.io <biochar@groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves
 
Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves


Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,
Kevin
Head Gardener
Inverewe
Poolwew
Achnasheen
Ross-shire
IV22 2LD

 

 

----------
Central Office in Edinburgh 

Hermiston Quay
5 Cultins Road
Edinburgh
EH11 4DF

The National Trust for Scotland for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty is a charity registered in Scotland, Charity Number SC007410

The contents of this e-mail are confidential to the intended recipient at the e-mail address to which it has been addressed. It may not be disclosed to or used by anyone other than this addressee nor may it be copied in any way. If received in error please notify us immediately by telephone and delete the e-mail. Neither The National Trust for Scotland nor the sender accepts any liability or responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan attachments (if any). Any views or other information in this e-mail which do not relate to our business are not authorised by us.  This e-mail does not form part of any contract unless so stated.

----------


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

All great solutions, but for what it's worth, i am a do-it-yourself guy.

Kevin, if you have an operation of this size, you almost certainly have the hand tools to make your own biochar burners from 55 gallon/200 litre drums. If you go to https://warmheartworldwide.org/biochar-training-videos/  you will find that the first video is a five minute quicky that will tell you everything you need and need to know to make one. If your prefer to view the video on Youtube, the link is https://youtu.be/YIbGkmt1VdE .

For feedstock, I would use any of the dead branches you collect around the place. The only drawback to using a TLUD of this type is that the branches will not necessarily fit in easily. I would bust them up as much as possible. Because different diameters take different times to char, I would try to use sticks of approximately the same size.

If you have grander desires, such as to manage dead trees and trees culled from your forest stand, you will want to switch technology to a big trench. That's another thing, although a lot easier. Just ask.

If you have any questions about this machine or any of the others, please just ask. Never to busy to share experience gained the hard way.

M

On Mon, Nov 25, 2019 at 11:58 PM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:
Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves



Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,

Kevin

Head Gardener

Inverewe

Poolwew

Achnasheen

Ross-shire

IV22 2LD

 

 

----------
Central Office in Edinburgh 

Hermiston Quay
5 Cultins Road
Edinburgh
EH11 4DF

The National Trust for Scotland for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty is a charity registered in Scotland, Charity Number SC007410

The contents of this e-mail are confidential to the intended recipient at the e-mail address to which it has been addressed. It may not be disclosed to or used by anyone other than this addressee nor may it be copied in any way. If received in error please notify us immediately by telephone and delete the e-mail. Neither The National Trust for Scotland nor the sender accepts any liability or responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan attachments (if any). Any views or other information in this e-mail which do not relate to our business are not authorised by us.  This e-mail does not form part of any contract unless so stated.

----------


Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

Hello Nadav Ziv

you should also try to recover the smoke … google Mokusaku for the Asian traditional practice or wood vinegar for the western style research

 

Mokusaku, also known as “wood vinegar”, is pyroligneous acid, a pesticide and insect repellant from the liquid that comes from water- cooling wood smoke. The equipment used is simple and the technology, ingenious. The smoke comes from making charcoal out of wood waste, for inserting into soil.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> Per conto di Nadav Ziv
Inviato: martedì 26 novembre 2019 04:26
A: Biochar@groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.


Don Coyne <don@...>
 

IMO the worldwide biochar industry needs to aim for negative emissions, I.e. capturing gas, liquids and solids. Anything else is a bit better than burning off. Making biochar in baths, drums or pits in the ground doesn’t cut it anymore I’m modern society. We drive cars and turn coal fuelled lights on for most part. Let’s got a little bit more sophisticated hey? 

My two cents and Chars! 

Don




On 26 Nov 2019, at 6:34 pm, "d.michael.shafer@..." <d.michael.shafer@...> wrote:


All great solutions, but for what it's worth, i am a do-it-yourself guy.

Kevin, if you have an operation of this size, you almost certainly have the hand tools to make your own biochar burners from 55 gallon/200 litre drums. If you go to https://warmheartworldwide.org/biochar-training-videos/  you will find that the first video is a five minute quicky that will tell you everything you need and need to know to make one. If your prefer to view the video on Youtube, the link is https://youtu.be/YIbGkmt1VdE .

For feedstock, I would use any of the dead branches you collect around the place. The only drawback to using a TLUD of this type is that the branches will not necessarily fit in easily. I would bust them up as much as possible. Because different diameters take different times to char, I would try to use sticks of approximately the same size.

If you have grander desires, such as to manage dead trees and trees culled from your forest stand, you will want to switch technology to a big trench. That's another thing, although a lot easier. Just ask.

If you have any questions about this machine or any of the others, please just ask. Never to busy to share experience gained the hard way.

M

On Mon, Nov 25, 2019 at 11:58 PM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:
Any advice for Kevin?

T R Miles Technical Consultants Inc.
Sent from mobile. 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Kevin Ball <kball@...>
Date: November 25, 2019 at 11:49:21 AM EST
To: "info@..." <info@...>
Subject: Bio-char stoves



Hello,

 

I work at Inverewe Garden in the North West Highlands of Scotland.

 

The Garden is 54 acres woodland Garden and the estate is 2000 acres.

 

We have been successfully making our own compost within three months and would like to start to inoculate the compost with biochar to increase the nutrient and soil life capacity of our naturally poor acidic soils in the garden – we have a very high rain fall, 2.5m per year and so our soil suffers from leaching of nutrients.

 

The reason for contacting you is to ask for advice on biochar stoves which our garden team could load to produce regular amounts of char to add to our compost? Are there bio-char stoves available commercially to purchase which could make more char than the ones seen on the internet using a 55litre tin drum?

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards,

Kevin

Head Gardener

Inverewe

Poolwew

Achnasheen

Ross-shire

IV22 2LD

 

 

----------
Central Office in Edinburgh 

Hermiston Quay
5 Cultins Road
Edinburgh
EH11 4DF

The National Trust for Scotland for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty is a charity registered in Scotland, Charity Number SC007410

The contents of this e-mail are confidential to the intended recipient at the e-mail address to which it has been addressed. It may not be disclosed to or used by anyone other than this addressee nor may it be copied in any way. If received in error please notify us immediately by telephone and delete the e-mail. Neither The National Trust for Scotland nor the sender accepts any liability or responsibility for viruses and it is your responsibility to scan attachments (if any). Any views or other information in this e-mail which do not relate to our business are not authorised by us.  This e-mail does not form part of any contract unless so stated.

----------


Nadav Ziv
 

Kevin,
It is indeed very interesting what is the resone for the char ph difference in accordance to pyrolysis production temperature.
Do you suggest that it is all matter of the balance between pyroligneous acids vs ash content inside the solid char? And as long as we increase temp the char will loose the acids and its ph will go up because of relatively more ash?
I like this explanation.
Nadav. 
 

בתאריך יום ג׳, 26 בנוב׳ 2019, 06:20, מאת Kevin Chisholm ‏<kchisholm@...>:

Hi Nadav

 

Very interesting! Should one consider that there might be “2 kinds of pH”, as follows:

1: “Temporary pH change”: This is a temporary pH lowering effect caused by pyroligneous acids that are dissipated by oxidation or biological soil activity.

and:

2: “Permanent pH change”: This is the pH raising effect caused by the alkaline materials in the ash components of the biochar.

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: Biochar@groups.io [mailto:Biochar@groups.io] On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv
Sent: November 25, 2019 11:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.


Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Don, this is an article I wrote and put into a small local paper, it is little bit different in terms of the charcoal came from an industrial process, - although that would be similiar to pyrolising city waste streams, - potentially a far greater volume than farm waste pyrolisis as the cities eat everything.
Whatever, Make of it what you will, hope it helps.

Cheers,
Geoff.

In reply to an earlier letter about some people eating meat substitute, I believe it is extremely unlikely that many people will give up eating meat, - particularly in emerging countries that have decades of poverty which significantly included not having enough money to buy any meat, - the which they now can do.. !  However, Animal farming does not have to remain harmful for the emvironment,   -  2% of Australians are farmers, half are cattle farmers, - they say, - but if you feed every cow in Australia, (app. 28 million, although that was before the drought, but no doubt will be again), app. 300mg of Charcoal/day, - eg in their molasses, that would alone sequester 2% of Australia's Greenhouse gasses, and at a very conservative estimate 6% more through methane reduction, as charcoal reduces, - or can eliminate, methane.
  Methane from cows and indeed almost all animals, including that pesky 7 billion animals with an ego, - Humanity. -  but wait, the good news does not stop there, those animals, - not just cows, - but any with a Rumen, and others though less, produce from any ordinary charcoal, High Quality Biochar, - which, buried by the ubiquitous Dung Beetle, deep in the ground, starts a tremendous renewal of the soil, - see,

So the cows, reducing Australia’s greenhouse gases by 8% and the other farm animals, app. half that again so a total of 12%, reduction by farming, and turning back the desertification started by our forbears, could make Australian Farming, Carbon neutral or better!! 
And considering the drought, the charcoal in the soil increases it’s water holding capacity four times.
(PS, better to not kill the soil biology with round-up, - that defeats the point of the exercise.)
There is now Govt. funding coming on line for increasing carbon in the soil.


On 26 Nov 2019, at 6:28 pm, Don Coyne <don@...> wrote:

IMO the worldwide biochar industry needs to aim for negative emissions, I.e. capturing gas, liquids and solids. Anything else is a bit better than burning off. Making biochar in baths, drums or pits in the ground doesn’t cut it anymore I’m modern society. We drive cars and turn coal fuelled lights on for most part. Let’s got a little bit more sophisticated hey? 

My two cents and Chars! 

Don


Don Coyne <don@...>
 

Hi Geoff,

 

Wow, someone responded! 😊 Yes, I’ve been an advocate of Doug Pow and his biochar method since 2014 when he attended our little gathering @ Biocharfest Mullumbimby and met Prof. Stephen Joseph, Dr Lukas Van Zwieten and they went on the to write the paper “Feeding Biochar to Cows: An Innovative Solution for Improving Soil Fertility and Farm Productivity” as a result. This paper now has 1K+ citations and the method is travelling all around the world. It’s a pity in some respects that the charcoal is made by Simcoa Operations who smelter silica dioxide to make silicon for solar panels, a very carbon intensive process but I’m sure there are worse operators around https://www.simcoa.com.au/

 

What I’d like to see when it comes to the production of biochar is a concerted & unified focus on best practice or PyCCS as stated in the 2018 IPCC special report. Biochar systems that create bioenergy, abating fossil fuel energy and or permanent pyrogas that can be stored in geological deposits. The liquids (wood vinegar, bio-oil) & high carbon content solid char in a zero or very limited oxygen environment.  Assessing the LCA of each biochar system including the mean distances feedstock travels to get to the location and product transported to end user. Might be a hard task but possible & necessary to measure total emissions of each project. I know European Biochar Certificate aka Hans Peter Schmidt is moving towards certifying Biochar Projects themselves. The scientific community are now screaming out to say we’ve got to take drastic measures to stop reaching 1.5 degrees by 2030! Is biochar truly carbon negative? Was this not the attraction for a lot of us when we got into this game? Perhaps advanced technology, localised and incorporated into Agroforestry whereby we grow trees for shade, biodiversity & profit, interspersed grazing using Doug’s method to reduce burping and build soil carbon and PyCCS/biochar that provides energy and carbon based profits further building soil carbon or sold at a profit for high end users elsewhere and we might have a chance of turning this ship around? Someone is also going to start a bush fire in Australia or California soon with an open style burn and it’s going to bring us all down IMO.

 

Chars,

 

Don Coyne

First Public Officer

Australia New Zealand Biochar Initiative Inc. (ANZBI)

1 Old Brunswick Rd,

Tyagarah, N.S.W. 2481

P: +61459175729

W: https://www.anzbi.org  

S: https://www.facebook.com/ANZBiochar/

biochar Logo-Initiative- Inc-OL 2018

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas
Sent: Wednesday, 27 November 2019 3:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Hi Don, this is an article I wrote and put into a small local paper, it is little bit different in terms of the charcoal came from an industrial process, - although that would be similiar to pyrolising city waste streams, - potentially a far greater volume than farm waste pyrolisis as the cities eat everything.

Whatever, Make of it what you will, hope it helps.

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

 

In reply to an earlier letter about some people eating meat substitute, I believe it is extremely unlikely that many people will give up eating meat, - particularly in emerging countries that have decades of poverty which significantly included not having enough money to buy any meat, - the which they now can do.. !  However, Animal farming does not have to remain harmful for the emvironment,   -  2% of Australians are farmers, half are cattle farmers, - they say, - but if you feed every cow in Australia, (app. 28 million, although that was before the drought, but no doubt will be again), app. 300mg of Charcoal/day, - eg in their molasses, that would alone sequester 2% of Australia's Greenhouse gasses, and at a very conservative estimate 6% more through methane reduction, as charcoal reduces, - or can eliminate, methane.

  Methane from cows and indeed almost all animals, including that pesky 7 billion animals with an ego, - Humanity. -  but wait, the good news does not stop there, those animals, - not just cows, - but any with a Rumen, and others though less, produce from any ordinary charcoal, High Quality Biochar, - which, buried by the ubiquitous Dung Beetle, deep in the ground, starts a tremendous renewal of the soil, - see,

 

So the cows, reducing Australia’s greenhouse gases by 8% and the other farm animals, app. half that again so a total of 12%, reduction by farming, and turning back the desertification started by our forbears, could make Australian Farming, Carbon neutral or better!! 

And considering the drought, the charcoal in the soil increases it’s water holding capacity four times.

(PS, better to not kill the soil biology with round-up, - that defeats the point of the exercise.)

There is now Govt. funding coming on line for increasing carbon in the soil.

 

 

On 26 Nov 2019, at 6:28 pm, Don Coyne <don@...> wrote:

 

IMO the worldwide biochar industry needs to aim for negative emissions, I.e. capturing gas, liquids and solids. Anything else is a bit better than burning off. Making biochar in baths, drums or pits in the ground doesn’t cut it anymore I’m modern society. We drive cars and turn coal fuelled lights on for most part. Let’s got a little bit more sophisticated hey? 

 

My two cents and Chars! 

 

Don

 


Paul S Anderson
 

Sorry, my error.   I should have said “tends to be alkaline.”       I got my Hp backwards 😊

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 9:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.


Don Coyne <don@...>
 

Hi Geoff,

Here is my email. 

Chars,

Don 


Paul Belanger
 

So how does one control the pyrolysis temperatures?

Paul

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 6:58 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Sorry, my error.   I should have said “tends to be alkaline.”       I got my Hp backwards 😊

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 9:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.


Nadav Ziv
 

Ohh Ok... Thanks for the correction Paul!
Nadav.


בתאריך יום ה׳, 28 בנוב׳ 2019, 04:58, מאת Paul S Anderson ‏<psanders@...>:

Sorry, my error.   I should have said “tends to be alkaline.”       I got my Hp backwards 😊

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 9:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.


winter.julien
 

The pyrolysis temperature in a TLUD is controlled by regulating the primary air.  The lowest temperature you can get without the flaming pyrolysis failing is about 550 °C.  The highest temperature you can get with natural draft is about 1200 °C when burning thicker fuel (e.g. 3 cm wide) as opposed to pellets (6 mm wide).  That is because more char burns on the surface of thicker fuel during the time it takes for the centre of the fuel to reach pyrolysis temperatures. 

To estimate the temperature of your TLUD reactor, you can compare your the amount of residual char and ash with the values on the graph on the second page of the following document:
http://www.biochar-bangladesh.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/TLUD_BasicParameters.pdf

The residual char and ash is what is left over when the primary pyrolysis of biomass is completed, but not what is left over if you don't quench the reaction and allow a gasification of charcoal to continue.   The graph is for woody biomass, but not for biomass containing a high amount of ash such as rice hulls.

Cheers,
Julien.


Ron Larson
 

Paul et al:

With TLUDs, there can be a significant temperature change (and pH change) with the amount of primary air being supplied. But there many ways to produce char with zero oxygen - only external high  temperature  (electricity, natural gas,  pyrolysis gases…).

Ron

On Dec 2, 2019, at 11:11 AM, Paul Belanger <pebelanger@...> wrote:

So how does one control the pyrolysis temperatures?
Paul
 
From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 6:58 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves
 
Sorry, my error.   I should have said “tends to be alkaline.”       I got my Hp backwards 😊
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP 
     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects
     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits
     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 9:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report toabuse@...]
Dear Paul, 
You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"
 
My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.
And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...
Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.
Nadav.



Gustavo Peña
 

a couple of stoves are going to have forced air and some natural draft.
I just got the materials today to start to work 

best regards.

Gustavo Peña
Inversiones Falcon
El Salvador, Centro América
Tel: (503) 2451 9605



El lun., 2 de dic. de 2019 a la(s) 12:11, Paul Belanger (pebelanger@...) escribió:

So how does one control the pyrolysis temperatures?

Paul

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, November 27, 2019 6:58 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

Sorry, my error.   I should have said “tends to be alkaline.”       I got my Hp backwards 😊

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Biochar@groups.io <Biochar@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nadav Ziv via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, November 25, 2019 9:26 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Bio-char stoves

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Dear Paul,

You wrote "Because biochar tends to be acidic, what would be good advice to Kevin about pH of his soils, his compost, and his biochar?"

 

My char is allways between ph=8 to ph=9.

And it is problemafic with our alkaline soils in Israel. Maybe we should switch chars...

Only recently I learned that I can produce acidic sludge char by lowering the pyrolysis temp.

Nadav.