Powbrook Avocado tallies 35% Increase in Fruit from Biochar Amended Orchard #compost #avocado #application #patent


Tom Miles
 

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia:

 

Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.

https://www.biocharwa.org.au/

https://www.facebook.com/bnwainc/

Tom Miles

International Biochar Initiative

Biochar-international.org

Logo160.

 

 


Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...>
 

humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Rick Wilson
 

Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Rick

Whats the biochar made of at what temperature and residence time.  Did you fully characterise it?

What is the soil type and what is the mulching practice?

We have just submitted a paper for review on 4 years of data from Dougs farmer trial that has a lot of information but until reviewed cant release it.  The Simcoa biochar comes from hardwood with a nice coating of water soluble organic molecules that really help microbe grow.   The kiln runs at 600C but the residence time for the small particles is short and NMR XPS of the biochar indicates a temperature of somewhere between 480 and 520C.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 8:50 AM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Hugh McLaughlin
 

Dr. Joseph,

I have noticed a pattern of describing HUGE breakthroughs and insights, only compromised by a lack of detail on how to reproduce the results and commercial constraints preventing disclosure, so I request you provide a list of publication that are available for us mortals to learn from, unconstrained by the petty issues of obstructed disclosure.

Always a fan,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
CTO - NextChar.com

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 8:52:09 PM EST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Rick

Whats the biochar made of at what temperature and residence time.  Did you fully characterise it?

What is the soil type and what is the mulching practice?

We have just submitted a paper for review on 4 years of data from Dougs farmer trial that has a lot of information but until reviewed cant release it.  The Simcoa biochar comes from hardwood with a nice coating of water soluble organic molecules that really help microbe grow.   The kiln runs at 600C but the residence time for the small particles is short and NMR XPS of the biochar indicates a temperature of somewhere between 480 and 520C.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 8:50 AM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Hugh

Kathy's results that she posted are real. I just cant give you a copy of the paper that looks at the characterisation work we did.  The actual data on the year on year results are published in the white paper that Sam Robb and I wrote that is on both the IBI and ANZBI web site.  Suggest you read this.

Please be patient.   I always give the scientific justification to work we do 

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 1:30 PM Hugh McLaughlin via Groups.Io <wastemin1=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Dr. Joseph,

I have noticed a pattern of describing HUGE breakthroughs and insights, only compromised by a lack of detail on how to reproduce the results and commercial constraints preventing disclosure, so I request you provide a list of publication that are available for us mortals to learn from, unconstrained by the petty issues of obstructed disclosure.

Always a fan,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
CTO - NextChar.com

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 8:52:09 PM EST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Rick

Whats the biochar made of at what temperature and residence time.  Did you fully characterise it?

What is the soil type and what is the mulching practice?

We have just submitted a paper for review on 4 years of data from Dougs farmer trial that has a lot of information but until reviewed cant release it.  The Simcoa biochar comes from hardwood with a nice coating of water soluble organic molecules that really help microbe grow.   The kiln runs at 600C but the residence time for the small particles is short and NMR XPS of the biochar indicates a temperature of somewhere between 480 and 520C.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 8:50 AM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Hugh McLaughlin
 

Stephan,

I would read it if I could find it. Science is not a scavenger hunt. Stop alluding to disclosure - provide links or stop pretending.

Looking forward to total disclosure. The world is watching and waiting. They deserve better.


Also, are your results replicated? - by you or anyone? That the difference between science and a one-off sound bite.

- Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE, CTO - NextChar.com

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:29:44 PM EST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Hugh

Kathy's results that she posted are real. I just cant give you a copy of the paper that looks at the characterisation work we did.  The actual data on the year on year results are published in the white paper that Sam Robb and I wrote that is on both the IBI and ANZBI web site.  Suggest you read this.

Please be patient.   I always give the scientific justification to work we do 

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 1:30 PM Hugh McLaughlin via Groups.Io <wastemin1=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Dr. Joseph,

I have noticed a pattern of describing HUGE breakthroughs and insights, only compromised by a lack of detail on how to reproduce the results and commercial constraints preventing disclosure, so I request you provide a list of publication that are available for us mortals to learn from, unconstrained by the petty issues of obstructed disclosure.

Always a fan,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
CTO - NextChar.com

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 8:52:09 PM EST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Rick

Whats the biochar made of at what temperature and residence time.  Did you fully characterise it?

What is the soil type and what is the mulching practice?

We have just submitted a paper for review on 4 years of data from Dougs farmer trial that has a lot of information but until reviewed cant release it.  The Simcoa biochar comes from hardwood with a nice coating of water soluble organic molecules that really help microbe grow.   The kiln runs at 600C but the residence time for the small particles is short and NMR XPS of the biochar indicates a temperature of somewhere between 480 and 520C.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 8:50 AM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Tom Miles
 

Repetitio est mater studiorum, repetition is the mother of study, as they taught us in elementary Latin. I will repeat what I described earlier as the system that Doug Pow created which uses biochar as an important component. He described the system during our study tour at the Australia New Zealand Biochar Conference.  Kathy and Stephen can correct me If I have missed important details.

 

Doug grows avocados on his farm in Western Australia. He has a clayey soil and wanted to modify the soil to be more like the volcanic soils where the variety of avocado that he grows comes from. So he created a system in which he uses biochar to increase the porosity; chicken manure to provide nutrients; wood chips to compost the chicken manure; and a watering system that provides small amounts of water frequently instead of large amounts less frequently. He uses a commercial grade road grader to remove and set aside 300-600 mm of soil. He then uses a dump truck with a vibrator, normally used for spreading salt on roads, to lay down a uniform layer of biochar. He then uses the road grader to replace the removed soil. He uses a roto hoe to blend the biochar into the soil. Then he lays down the wood chips, chicken manure and  the irrigation system. Trees are spaced 4.5 meters apart in rows spaced 9 meters apart.  

 

The composting chicken manure charges the biochar amended soils which feeds the roots of the avocado trees. By watering less, more frequently he charges the soil with enough water for the trees without saturating them or letting a lot of water pond and evaporate. The result is shorter trees that are more full, with abundant roots and have twice the number of fruit compared with the control. From the sampling of 36 (of 1000 ) trees that have been amended with biochar the yield improvement is 35% by weight. There are 1000 trees in the control

 

He intends to amend another 1000 trees. For existing trees he uses the same road grader (which he rents because it is fast and efficient) and cuts a wedge in below the drip line of the trees. He fills the wedge with biochar and uses the roto hoe to blend the biochar in with the soil. Then he applies the chicken manure and wood chips and irrigation system. He gets similar growth results.

 

Between the rows wander his 100 cows which he maintains to keep the rows clean between the avocado trees. He buys glycerin from a local biodiesel plant (because it is cheaper than molasses) as a sweetener and mixes it with biochar. The cows eat the biochar free choice. As they eat the grass between the rows of avocado trees they drop their manure. The manure is consumed buy dung beetles which drag the biochar enhanced manure down into the soil. His dung beetles are another story that you will find on the web. He showed us an amazing video on 5,000 dung beetles working on one cow pat.

 

He has shown his system to countless farmers in the region. Now all the stone fruit farmers are using biochar in a similar fashion. The 4,000 tons per year of biochar available from the silicon plant is exhausted, although they will be increasing their charcoal production next year by 50%.

 

The lesson is that the biochar has been incorporated as one component into an agronomic system that works with Doug’s soils and avocados. It also works for may other orchard growers in the area. Healthier soil, less watering, more fruit. The healthier trees resist disease. He uses no pesticides or herbicides on a regular basis, only small amounts strategically.

 

Tom

            

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Thursday, January 09, 2020 7:30 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Powbrook Avocado tallies 35% Increase in Fruit from Biochar Amended Orchard

 

Hi Hugh

 

Kathy's results that she posted are real. I just cant give you a copy of the paper that looks at the characterisation work we did.  The actual data on the year on year results are published in the white paper that Sam Robb and I wrote that is on both the IBI and ANZBI web site.  Suggest you read this.

 

Please be patient.   I always give the scientific justification to work we do 

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 1:30 PM Hugh McLaughlin via Groups.Io <wastemin1=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Dr. Joseph,

 

I have noticed a pattern of describing HUGE breakthroughs and insights, only compromised by a lack of detail on how to reproduce the results and commercial constraints preventing disclosure, so I request you provide a list of publication that are available for us mortals to learn from, unconstrained by the petty issues of obstructed disclosure.

 

Always a fan,

 

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

CTO - NextChar.com

 

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 8:52:09 PM EST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Rick

 

Whats the biochar made of at what temperature and residence time.  Did you fully characterise it?

 

What is the soil type and what is the mulching practice?

 

We have just submitted a paper for review on 4 years of data from Dougs farmer trial that has a lot of information but until reviewed cant release it.  The Simcoa biochar comes from hardwood with a nice coating of water soluble organic molecules that really help microbe grow.   The kiln runs at 600C but the residence time for the small particles is short and NMR XPS of the biochar indicates a temperature of somewhere between 480 and 520C.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 8:50 AM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

 

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

 

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

 

Rick Wilson

 

 

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:

 

 

humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 

Regards, Benoit in Québec 



Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

 

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 

 

Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.

Tom Miles

International Biochar Initiative

<image003.jpg>

 

 

<Powbrookavocados.jpg>

 


Rick Wilson
 

Stephen, yes the biochar that was used is commercial, and fully analyzed. Softwood, gasification. We are also using Cool Planet's on new plantings of tango adjacently, and the caliper measurements show the control is doing better there also.  

The control, standard practice, is there is no mulching. The trees are cropped yearly, and the trimmings, and any leaves fall. Soil is sandy-clay loam.  The belief-experience is that mulching reduces pathogens (which show up under stress), and water use, but not growth. Our mulching studies with lemons in the 3-year Healthy Soils Grant with Limoneira and the UC Extension may confirm this statistically.

I am not using a specially coated biochar.Can I get some?  What should I try it on?  Could we get a container into LA at some point?

I have not seen biochar outgrow a system using precision fertigation like in our Avocado trial. Growers here are very good at it, precisely, meaning adding liquid fertilizers through the irrigation system, controlling timing and quantity, tracking leaf nutrients, its a hydroponics system in the outdoors.  Ground and tree fruits.  

I am looking forward to reviewing your paper when available! 

I need help developing a guide, a decision tree, to help guide matching biochar (and other amendments) to agronomic challenge.  Matching biochar type, properties, soil characteristics, crop type. to the diagnosed soil or crop limitation. 

My contribution would include, I've seen biochar help where sodium is high in high clay soils, assuming you leach the soil. I have seen biochar help where infiltration is low in multiple crop and soil types.  I have seen biochar with high soluble potassium levels help with Alfalfa (which demands potassium early in its growth, saturation extract test, its very important). I have seen biochar help in Turf where organic levels were low (and water holding capacity low).  Accelerating accumulation of soil organic matter over the long haul in many soils.... 

But my experiences are very limited compared to the broader group.  

Rick





On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 07:29:44 PM PST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Hugh

Kathy's results that she posted are real. I just cant give you a copy of the paper that looks at the characterisation work we did.  The actual data on the year on year results are published in the white paper that Sam Robb and I wrote that is on both the IBI and ANZBI web site.  Suggest you read this.

Please be patient.   I always give the scientific justification to work we do 

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 1:30 PM Hugh McLaughlin via Groups.Io <wastemin1=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Dr. Joseph,

I have noticed a pattern of describing HUGE breakthroughs and insights, only compromised by a lack of detail on how to reproduce the results and commercial constraints preventing disclosure, so I request you provide a list of publication that are available for us mortals to learn from, unconstrained by the petty issues of obstructed disclosure.

Always a fan,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
CTO - NextChar.com

On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 8:52:09 PM EST, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Rick

Whats the biochar made of at what temperature and residence time.  Did you fully characterise it?

What is the soil type and what is the mulching practice?

We have just submitted a paper for review on 4 years of data from Dougs farmer trial that has a lot of information but until reviewed cant release it.  The Simcoa biochar comes from hardwood with a nice coating of water soluble organic molecules that really help microbe grow.   The kiln runs at 600C but the residence time for the small particles is short and NMR XPS of the biochar indicates a temperature of somewhere between 480 and 520C.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Jan 10, 2020 at 8:50 AM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


ROBERT W GILLETT
 

Hugh,

For you and everyone else having difficulty finding the article that Stephen suggested, I believe this is it: https://www.anzbi.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/ANZBI-2019-_-A-Report-on-the-Value-of-Biochar-and-Wood-Vinegar-v-1.1.pdf

G'day,
Robert Gillett


mikethewormguy
 

Rick

In regard to creating a who, what, where, why, and how decision tree for biochar it maybe helpful to keep in mind that biochar is but one tool in the agronomic challenge mitigation tool kit.....

So it is really more about developing the tool kit and understanding biochar's place in this system approach.....

my 2 cents,

Mike






Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Rick Wilson
 

Mike, I completely agree with you.  Rick

On Friday, January 10, 2020, 08:54:39 AM PST, mikethewormguy via Groups.Io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:


Rick

In regard to creating a who, what, where, why, and how decision tree for biochar it maybe helpful to keep in mind that biochar is but one tool in the agronomic challenge mitigation tool kit.....

So it is really more about developing the tool kit and understanding biochar's place in this system approach.....

my 2 cents,

Mike






Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


mikethewormguy
 

Rick,

I think it would useful for this group to have an expanded tool kit discussion......

There is only so much biochar can do as a "stand alone" material, in my humble opinion.

my 2 cents

Mike.









Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Francesco Tortorici
 

Rick,
You said ".....fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old"  What do you mean by fully wetted?  Was it "charged" in any way or only wetted with water.  If only wetted with water, it may be that the biochar is capturing nutrients.  Perhaps I am misunderstanding what you did.

Thanks,
Francesco

We know more about the stars overhead than the soil underfoot.
Leonardo Da Vinci


On Thu, Jan 9, 2020 at 1:50 PM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


Rick Wilson
 

Francesco, the biochar had a high density indicative of being filled with water.  It was not charged.  
No one is charging biochar and making biochar available at commercial scale. My role is demonstration at commercial scale. 

I do not believe that charging a biochar with a "new" microbe, one that the soil has not ever seen before, and having that microbe prevail in an established soil with an existing microbiome, is possible with today's technology.  I am not aware of anyone that has shown they can do it (show the new microbe remains in the soil through DNA analysis).

If someone has, I would love to see that paper!

Instead, I believe proponents of charging biochar with microbes are being confused by the fact that microbial soups are acidic, and that charging the biochar with microbes is really adding acid - neutralizing the biochar. Additionally, microbial soups are wetting the internal surface of biochar amplifying beneficial properties like water holding capacity.

I do believe inoculating soil and changing its microbiome has great potential, as does changing - engineering the human microbiome (for instance heavy people have a different gut microbiome than skinny people, imagine treating obesity in humans!), I am not aware of anyone doing that yet either. 

Rick



On Friday, January 10, 2020, 11:57:50 AM PST, Francesco Tortorici <francesco@...> wrote:


Rick,
You said ".....fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old"  What do you mean by fully wetted?  Was it "charged" in any way or only wetted with water.  If only wetted with water, it may be that the biochar is capturing nutrients.  Perhaps I am misunderstanding what you did.

Thanks,
Francesco

We know more about the stars overhead than the soil underfoot.
Leonardo Da Vinci


On Thu, Jan 9, 2020 at 1:50 PM Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do we why the WA team believed they saw positive results?  Is there a particular soil deficiency that the biochar addressed?

I have been running an avocado trial (established) for three years with biochar in Santa Paula, CA, 12 CY per acre, three acres treated, applied in the root zones under the tree line, after we cleared out some of the soil, and then put the soil back. (Avocado roots grow out, about 9 inches deep).  Fertilization is professionally managed and drop irrigation is used "fertigation".  So the grove started out in good shape. 

The control is giving slightly better yields. The trunks measured with calipers after three years are larger for the control.  The soil is about 2% organic matter, and it is calcareous.  This biochar was from a major producer, fully wetted upon receipt, about six months old.  Perhaps the biochar is imparting time release on the fertigation, slowing nutrient release to the plant (which I have seen in greenhouse studies), reducing yield.

I did not have a particular problem I was trying to fix with the biochar, tried it because I had some biochar. There are also treatments with top dressed compost at 20 tons per acre, and the compost seems to be reducing the soil pH over time.

Rick Wilson


On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:44:20 AM PST, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:


humm Thank you Kathy and Tom! So nice to read about such spectacular results, especially on avocado, a product with such strong and rising demand. I read similar results for blueberries, tomatoes, hemp. Of course biochar will not work with everything, but all we need is a few crops to get going. Biochar reduces water and fertilizers needs, while trapping GHG — indeed win-win-win. And the effect is permanent in most cases. 
Regards, Benoit in Québec 

Le 9 janv. 2020 à 13:18, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> a écrit :

From Kathy Dawson, Biochar Network of Western Australia: 
 
Many thanks to Vic Grozotis for enabling a special run of Doug Pow's avocados at his Manjimup packhouse yesterday. All avocados were stripped from both the biochar trial row (about 4 and a third bins) and the control row (3 bins) and were run separately through the grading process. Final figures indicate there was 35% more marketable fruit from the 36 biochar treated trees. We need to play around with the figures to see where real differences lie. Unfortunately the funded project concluded two years ago so the continuation of assessing and record keeping is a great voluntary effort that will benefit more than the avocado industry.
Tom Miles
International Biochar Initiative
<image003.jpg>
 
 
<Powbrookavocados.jpg>


mikethewormguy
 

Rick,

Typically the purpose of adding a community of microbes to the soil is to augment the soil community already in residence. 

Part of the reason behind crafting a disease suppressive soil is having a larger community of beneficial microbes in residence.

Compost, vermicompost and garden soil additions to soil do just that. The use of biochar to do the same thing is just an additional substrate choice.  

Also microbial soups can be acidic, basic, or neutral in pH.  Mother Nature is pretty flexible, in this context.

From our own experience, the most effective place to augment the soil microbial community is in the rhizospere.  This can be done via seed, transplant, and/or soil drench.  All of these approaches use only a small amount of biochar.

It is also best to bio- charge  the char material with a fresh sample of wee beasties.

At the end of the day, it is optimal to bio-charge the char material onsite or near site and in real time.  These conditions and use amounts do not lend themselves to creating an off the shelf one size fits all char product.

my 2 cents,

Mike









Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Rick Wilson
 

Mike,

The camp I am in believes when you add soil amendments, you are changing (improving) the soils physical and chemical properties, Making the soil more habitable to the microbial populations.  

By feeding the existing microbiome with carbon and nutrients, and improving the properties of the soil such as through aeration supplying oxygen for respiration,, the microbes that are there they thrive, and you get all the benefits of greater microbe populations, disease suppression, etc.  New microbe species look like food to the microbiome that has been there for thousands of years and adapted to the conditions and each other. 

Is it possible to change out a microbiome in the soil?  If it is possible, I have to believe it's a numbers game, you have to overwhelm the one that is there (perhaps this is your experience with vermicompost?).  Otherwise I believe you would have to design or culture a super dominant microbial population, and doing would be the remit of a well funded biotech startup with army's of Ph.D.s.

I would love to see a paper where a new microbe was introduced to the soil and it prevails. If anyone knows of such papers please send me the coordinates, I would be highly appreciative!

Why would a microbial soup be alkaline on its own?  What is the metabolic process?  It's acidic because microbial metabolisms produce low molecular weight organic acids.

Rick




On Saturday, January 11, 2020, 07:51:22 AM PST, mikethewormguy via Groups.Io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:


Rick,

Typically the purpose of adding a community of microbes to the soil is to augment the soil community already in residence. 

Part of the reason behind crafting a disease suppressive soil is having a larger community of beneficial microbes in residence.

Compost, vermicompost and garden soil additions to soil do just that. The use of biochar to do the same thing is just an additional substrate choice.  

Also microbial soups can be acidic, basic, or neutral in pH.  Mother Nature is pretty flexible, in this context.

From our own experience, the most effective place to augment the soil microbial community is in the rhizospere.  This can be done via seed, transplant, and/or soil drench.  All of these approaches use only a small amount of biochar.

It is also best to bio- charge  the char material with a fresh sample of wee beasties.

At the end of the day, it is optimal to bio-charge the char material onsite or near site and in real time.  These conditions and use amounts do not lend themselves to creating an off the shelf one size fits all char product.

my 2 cents,

Mike









Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Laurent Chabanne
 

Rick, I believe that by "charged", Francesco meant charged with nutrients. If you put raw biochar in soil, it may draw nutrients to an extent that they are not readily available to the plants.

Hugh, no need to be aggressive, Stephen is a university researcher; he publishes peer-review papers and cannot publish his data before it appears in the journal, otherwise the journal will refuse publication. (https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=es&as_sdt=0,5&q=author:joseph-stephen+biochar&scisbd=1)


Rick Wilson
 

Hi Laurent, certainly charging biochar with nutrients no question can be a value added approach. Rick



On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, 06:24:00 PM PST, Laurent Chabanne via Groups.Io <laurentbiochar@...> wrote:


Rick, I believe that by "charged", Francesco meant charged with nutrients. If you put raw biochar in soil, it may draw nutrients to an extent that they are not readily available to the plants.

Hugh, no need to be aggressive, Stephen is a university researcher; he publishes peer-review papers and cannot publish his data before it appears in the journal, otherwise the journal will refuse publication. (https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=es&as_sdt=0,5&q=author:joseph-stephen+biochar&scisbd=1)


Rick Wilson
 

Tom, this is fascinating work.  It would be great if there was a 1-page graphic of the process, a model of sustainable farming. I would start one if I was convinced it could make money.  I did not see cover crops in the mix, which from what I've seen is very helpful.  
Rick

On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, 07:03:39 PM PST, Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012@...> wrote:


Hi Laurent, certainly charging biochar with nutrients no question can be a value added approach. Rick



On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, 06:24:00 PM PST, Laurent Chabanne via Groups.Io <laurentbiochar@...> wrote:


Rick, I believe that by "charged", Francesco meant charged with nutrients. If you put raw biochar in soil, it may draw nutrients to an extent that they are not readily available to the plants.

Hugh, no need to be aggressive, Stephen is a university researcher; he publishes peer-review papers and cannot publish his data before it appears in the journal, otherwise the journal will refuse publication. (https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=es&as_sdt=0,5&q=author:joseph-stephen+biochar&scisbd=1)