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Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you #patent #b4ss #gef


Tom Miles
 

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.

Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

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Stephen Joseph
 

to all those companies in the US filing patents I think it is important to know that a lot of the work that has now been patented has been presented at the early conferences we had in Australia.

Robert Flanagan did a lot of work

Here is one of his presentations

Tom

We should try and retrieve all of the ppts that were given at IBI APBC and USBI before 2012 so this prior art is available to all.

I also suggest getting all of the documents from the Japan Biochar association as there is extensive literature
that would invalidate many of the patents that have been granted. especially on wood vinegar


On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 2:16 PM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.

Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser.
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Tom Miles
 

Good suggestions. Thanks

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 3:19 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you

 

to all those companies in the US filing patents I think it is important to know that a lot of the work that has now been patented has been presented at the early conferences we had in Australia.

 

Robert Flanagan did a lot of work

 

Here is one of his presentations

 

Tom

 

We should try and retrieve all of the ppts that were given at IBI APBC and USBI before 2012 so this prior art is available to all.

 

I also suggest getting all of the documents from the Japan Biochar association as there is extensive literature

that would invalidate many of the patents that have been granted. especially on wood vinegar

 

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 2:16 PM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.


Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser.

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Rick Wilson
 

Re patenting, The rule is first to file, not first to invent. This rule (changed from first to invent around 2013) gives advantage to someone with money, as it can be $20K USD or more to get a patent. Filing must occur within one year of public disclosure. To get a patent you have to enable it (show data).  

The argument for first to file, is that if you don't have the money to file a patent, you don't have money to commercialize the technology.  It's in the common good to commercialize technology. 

You can challenge a patent of course with prior disclosures as Stephen suggests. Which also costs a lot of money in legal fees.   

Note, It can be prohibitively expensive to monitor patent violations.  If someone in remote Bangladesh is using your patented technology, who is going to know?  Monitoring costs money.  

My advise. If you are using a patented biochar technology, worry when someone shows up at your door serving you cease and desist notice. If that happens, it's because you are successful and making a lot of money (or no one would care to spend the money going after you), and you can challenge the patent with prior disclosure data, or buy a license. 

Rick


On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 04:22:48 PM PST, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:


Good suggestions. Thanks

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 3:19 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you

 

to all those companies in the US filing patents I think it is important to know that a lot of the work that has now been patented has been presented at the early conferences we had in Australia.

 

Robert Flanagan did a lot of work

 

Here is one of his presentations

 

Tom

 

We should try and retrieve all of the ppts that were given at IBI APBC and USBI before 2012 so this prior art is available to all.

 

I also suggest getting all of the documents from the Japan Biochar association as there is extensive literature

that would invalidate many of the patents that have been granted. especially on wood vinegar

 

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 2:16 PM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.


Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser.

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp


Geoff Thomas
 

I sympathise with those wanting to earn money from their inventions, in the ideal society, those rare creative people who may even change society with their inventions, should be supported.
Unfortunately, modern society is mainly ruled by the super rich, whose only talent seems to be acquiring huge amounts of money, often without doing much, and who also believe in getting hold of other peopl’s inventions for as little as
I find that after a lifetime of experience in different fields that I am having many new ideas and being requested to share them in writing or speaking, but i can’t make any money on them as it would require as Rick mentions a huge amount to just patent an idea, let alone create an industry to bring it to the market, and besides, the ideas are to help society, so they need to be available to all, - indeed I don’t require attribution as the ideas have to get their own life and will only if they are seen to be helpful.
I do get some satisfaction seeing them enter various areas I have introduced them to, - often as someone else’s idea, either with my exact words, or  reinterpreted, - it doesn’t matter,  as I often say, Fame is Transitory, Service is Forever, and I don’t know where I stole that saying from:) 
However, my point is, that it is a very good idea to document when etc. you entered your idea into the public domain, so that at a later time if you are developing your idea or find a situation you can start producing etc, but someone says you can’t because they have patented the idea, you can prove you had already entered your idea into the public domain, so they should not have patented it.
Just how far you have to go I don’t know, I assume if you have incorporated your new idea into a submission to a Govt. department or major company, or entered it into a discussion group? that should be enough, but please tell me if I am wrong. 
Cheers, Geoff Thomas.

On 17 Jan 2020, at 9:18 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

to all those companies in the US filing patents I think it is important to know that a lot of the work that has now been patented has been presented at the early conferences we had in Australia.

Robert Flanagan did a lot of work

Here is one of his presentations

Tom

We should try and retrieve all of the ppts that were given at IBI APBC and USBI before 2012 so this prior art is available to all.

I also suggest getting all of the documents from the Japan Biochar association as there is extensive literature
that would invalidate many of the patents that have been granted. especially on wood vinegar

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 2:16 PM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion, 

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this: 
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a 

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you: 

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project. 

Did you find the link interesting? 

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a 

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603 

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser. 
Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp


<Robert Flanagan Biochar Workshop LR Oct2010.ppt>


Mark Ludlow
 

What a great project! Not just for content but for project design and management and unflagging idealism!

I hope the video comes out soon!

 


From: main@biochar.groups.io on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 7:16 PM
To: Biochar Discussion
Subject: [Biochar] Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you
 

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.

Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser.
Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp


Rick Wilson
 

Stephen, I agree with you. 

The capitalist in me also knows that having patent protection enables you to raise investment funds to commercialize your technology.  No patent. No money.  No industry. No solution. 

Rick

On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 07:30:19 PM PST, Mark Ludlow <mark@...> wrote:


What a great project! Not just for content but for project design and management and unflagging idealism!

I hope the video comes out soon!

 

From: main@biochar.groups.io on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 7:16 PM
To: Biochar Discussion
Subject: [Biochar] Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you
 

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.

Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser.
Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp


Laurent Chabanne
 

Geoff, any public release is enough to prevent a patent from being filed. If you wrote it in your blog, in the local South Malaysian journal or mentioned it in a conference, this is enough. To be honest, many biochar patents don't seem really solid in that regard...


Laurent Chabanne
 

Rick, I totally agree with you: patenting is important to raise money, even if the patent is not really easy to defend.

 

Patents are useful for a lot more things than just protecting IP.


Geoff Thomas
 

Thank you Laurent, I am glad to hear that.

On 17 Jan 2020, at 2:58 pm, Laurent Chabanne via Groups.Io <laurentbiochar@...> wrote:

Geoff, any public release is enough to prevent a patent from being filed. If you wrote it in your blog, in the local South Malaysian journal or mentioned it in a conference, this is enough. To be honest, many biochar patents don't seem really solid in that regard...


Frank Strie
 

RE: “No patent. No money.  No industry. No solution.”


Hello all,

This subject about the classic “Patent protection”(Cards to the Chest) touches on the very question of reason WHAT motivates us and WHY are we are even involved in the first instance in the whole Biochar, FiltrationChar, FeedChar, ConstructionChar, and specialised DesignerChars topic.
If it is about Carbon Climate Action = a race with time, if it is about assisting less fortunate people and communities in problematic situations to leap frog out of such misery, is it to have tools and methods that assist satiation and hygiene, hunger, food quality, air quality, water quality ,  hydrology, landscape restoration, pro-active flammability risk reduction upcycling of wastes, etc …, the open source information availability spreads very fast without delay, As a classic example we have seen it happen in the revolutionary spread and success of the Kon-Tiki style deep cone, flame curtain kilns, as it spread to,  was copied and modified in more than 70 countries in 3 years since 2014.
The way the Ithaka Institute and Associates (like myself) handled this urgent topic and the  way we shared and exchanged our findings and observations was due to our attitude and priority to make things open source so that carbon action happens in as many places and by as many people as possible. This has and is assisting industrial scale mobile and stationary plants become reality.
One fundamental ethical, cultural principles my close associates in Austria, Germany, Nepal, Norway, Spain, Switzerland and the USA …, have become to understand and support this guiding priciple:
“Knowledge is the treasure that keeps growing in value by sharing it” – everyone has the chance to contribute and take it further for everyone’s benefit it its. I get far more benefits (in most cases) from sharing, collaborating and assisting others than to have my pride and self interest in the foreground. What goes around, comes around as we have this one Earth, the time is ticking fore very single one of us. This is my 13th Year of full time Biochar action in some form and 16 years since Prof. Bruno Glaser in Germany  first responded to my questions from under Down Under in Tasmania.
Frank
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products


 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Laurent Chabanne via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, January 17, 2020 4:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you

 

Rick, I totally agree with you: patenting is important to raise money, even if the patent is not really easy to defend.

 

Patents are useful for a lot more things than just protecting IP.


Rick Wilson
 

Frank, 

(thanks for sharing your website and story, very impressive achievement!  We loved Tasmania visiting often when we lived in Melbourne, Freycinet Chardonnay from the East Coast is my favorite wine!)

I agree that open source information certainly can help those positioned to go off the grid and leverage and deploy these biochar and AG technologies at a localized scale. Assuming of course you can make sense of the thousands of academic papers on the subject, and have the time to do so.  If you can, you should do it. In your words, Climate Action = race with time. 

But I don't believe that self sufficiency, like you have achieved, as commendable as it is, is practical for most of the earth's population. 

The impact of Climate change will be too big and will happen fast, with most people living in cities (think, what happens to the 2.75M people in Miami as groundwater starts to flood the sewers from rising sea waters, probably before I retire).  These people can not start farming to feed themselves.  They will be displaced. Needing a big industrial AG complex, and innovations that do not exist today.  Relying on investors that require the guarantee of patent protection to justify their risk, in the end, preventing starvation.  

For instance, patents are why we have breakthrough drugs, so the companies can justify the financial risk of developing them. You would have have cholesterol medicine, antibiotics, chemotherapy drugs, etc, with open source.

Rick



On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 10:28:33 PM PST, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:


RE: “No patent. No money.  No industry. No solution.”


Hello all,

This subject about the classic “Patent protection”(Cards to the Chest) touches on the very question of reason WHAT motivates us and WHY are we are even involved in the first instance in the whole Biochar, FiltrationChar, FeedChar, ConstructionChar, and specialised DesignerChars topic.
If it is about Carbon Climate Action = a race with time, if it is about assisting less fortunate people and communities in problematic situations to leap frog out of such misery, is it to have tools and methods that assist satiation and hygiene, hunger, food quality, air quality, water quality ,  hydrology, landscape restoration, pro-active flammability risk reduction upcycling of wastes, etc …, the open source information availability spreads very fast without delay, As a classic example we have seen it happen in the revolutionary spread and success of the Kon-Tiki style deep cone, flame curtain kilns, as it spread to,  was copied and modified in more than 70 countries in 3 years since 2014.
The way the Ithaka Institute and Associates (like myself) handled this urgent topic and the  way we shared and exchanged our findings and observations was due to our attitude and priority to make things open source so that carbon action happens in as many places and by as many people as possible. This has and is assisting industrial scale mobile and stationary plants become reality.
One fundamental ethical, cultural principles my close associates in Austria, Germany, Nepal, Norway, Spain, Switzerland and the USA …, have become to understand and support this guiding priciple:
“Knowledge is the treasure that keeps growing in value by sharing it” – everyone has the chance to contribute and take it further for everyone’s benefit it its. I get far more benefits (in most cases) from sharing, collaborating and assisting others than to have my pride and self interest in the foreground. What goes around, comes around as we have this one Earth, the time is ticking fore very single one of us. This is my 13th Year of full time Biochar action in some form and 16 years since Prof. Bruno Glaser in Germany  first responded to my questions from under Down Under in Tasmania.
Frank
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products


 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Laurent Chabanne via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, January 17, 2020 4:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Tom Miles is forwarding an email to you

 

Rick, I totally agree with you: patenting is important to raise money, even if the patent is not really easy to defend.

 

Patents are useful for a lot more things than just protecting IP.


Laurent Chabanne
 

Rick, I'm with you on that: no big capital expense without some form of protection from competition.

And a big machine that can use the heat efficiently (for district water heating and electricity for example) will be more efficient for a kon tiki. There is a place for both.


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Tom,

This project has been on my radar for some time, although they apparently have been too busy to answer their email.

Reading this summary of their work is enlightening in good and bad ways. On the plus side, it is nice to know that the UN wallahs have found the biochar can help with a number of big problems. It is also good to hear that several scientific papers, reports and conferences were generated by this multi-year, costly effort.

On the other hand, what is really striking to me is that while the Ethiopian results are the same as those of the Warm Heart Ghana, plant-to-plant tests (40% yield increases), no attention seems to have been paid to extension. I have a younger brother and sister from Ethiopia, both of whom spend considerable time in-country, and neither were aware of this project. Likewise, in Kenya, we run 5 biochar training centers and collaborate with Kiisumu University. None of us have heard mention of this project from farmers.

Our concern is, or rather, continues to be, that the developed world scientific, funding and governing bodies are more interested in biochar as a technical "problem" than as a worldly solution (and, yes, I do understand that biochar is highly complex). But there is more at play here than just the continued ignoring of the global poor. My team members response to this summary sums up a feeling that is, I think, fairly wide spread in rural Africa, "They don't care about us. We are just here to do the digging for their research."

My team members and the farmers they work with are, of course, way too poor to speak up or to refuse the work when offered, but the bitterness is tangible, as is the talk about what the colonialists at least offered in return.

None of this will make any difference and I know that I am becoming a caricature grumpy old man on this theme, but really. The only good thing to say about the whole mess is that it makes my work so much easier!

M

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 10:16 AM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion,

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you:

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project.

Did you find the link interesting?

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser.
Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp


Geoff Thomas
 

Michael, that level of interest is from one who wants to write a paper and become widely known thereby.
Nothing else is relevant, - Sad.
How can one guide such a greedy soul to selfless research, - perhaps you can help, - you did it.
Cheers,
Geoff.

On 18 Jan 2020, at 5:31 pm, d.michael.shafer@... wrote:

Tom,

This project has been on my radar for some time, although they apparently have been too busy to answer their email.

Reading this summary of their work is enlightening in good and bad ways. On the plus side, it is nice to know that the UN wallahs have found the biochar can help with a number of big problems. It is also good to hear that several scientific papers, reports and conferences were generated by this multi-year, costly effort.

On the other hand, what is really striking to me is that while the Ethiopian results are the same as those of the Warm Heart Ghana, plant-to-plant tests (40% yield increases), no attention seems to have been paid to extension. I have a younger brother and sister from Ethiopia, both of whom spend considerable time in-country, and neither were aware of this project. Likewise, in Kenya, we run 5 biochar training centers and collaborate with Kiisumu University. None of us have heard mention of this project from farmers.

Our concern is, or rather, continues to be, that the developed world scientific, funding and governing bodies are more interested in biochar as a technical "problem" than as a worldly solution (and, yes, I do understand that biochar is highly complex). But there is more at play here than just the continued ignoring of the global poor. My team members response to this summary sums up a feeling that is, I think, fairly wide spread in rural Africa, "They don't care about us. We are just here to do the digging for their research."

My team members and the farmers they work with are, of course, way too poor to speak up or to refuse the work when offered, but the bitterness is tangible, as is the talk about what the colonialists at least offered in return.

None of this will make any difference and I know that I am becoming a caricature grumpy old man on this theme, but really. The only good thing to say about the whole mess is that it makes my work so much easier!

M

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 10:16 AM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion, 

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this: 
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a 

Tom Miles also included this personal message to you: 

All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project. 

Did you find the link interesting? 

You can forward it on to your friends, too:
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a 

You can subscribe for more emails at:
http://international.us11.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=15ecd95603 

* Note: if any of the URLs above are not clickable, you can copy/paste them into your web browser. 
Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp




d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Geoff, thanks, but no thanks. It is hard enough to lead my own life. I am not fit to lead or role model for others. I would just like some help.


On Sat, Jan 18, 2020, 2:42 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Michael, that level of interest is from one who wants to write a paper and become widely known thereby.
Nothing else is relevant, - Sad.
How can one guide such a greedy soul to selfless research, - perhaps you can help, - you did it.
Cheers,
Geoff.

On 18 Jan 2020, at 5:31 pm, d.michael.shafer@... wrote:

Tom,

This project has been on my radar for some time, although they apparently have been too busy to answer their email.

Reading this summary of their work is enlightening in good and bad ways. On the plus side, it is nice to know that the UN wallahs have found the biochar can help with a number of big problems. It is also good to hear that several scientific papers, reports and conferences were generated by this multi-year, costly effort.

On the other hand, what is really striking to me is that while the Ethiopian results are the same as those of the Warm Heart Ghana, plant-to-plant tests (40% yield increases), no attention seems to have been paid to extension. I have a younger brother and sister from Ethiopia, both of whom spend considerable time in-country, and neither were aware of this project. Likewise, in Kenya, we run 5 biochar training centers and collaborate with Kiisumu University. None of us have heard mention of this project from farmers.

Our concern is, or rather, continues to be, that the developed world scientific, funding and governing bodies are more interested in biochar as a technical "problem" than as a worldly solution (and, yes, I do understand that biochar is highly complex). But there is more at play here than just the continued ignoring of the global poor. My team members response to this summary sums up a feeling that is, I think, fairly wide spread in rural Africa, "They don't care about us. We are just here to do the digging for their research."

My team members and the farmers they work with are, of course, way too poor to speak up or to refuse the work when offered, but the bitterness is tangible, as is the talk about what the colonialists at least offered in return.

None of this will make any difference and I know that I am becoming a caricature grumpy old man on this theme, but really. The only good thing to say about the whole mess is that it makes my work so much easier!

M




photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart
www.warmheartworldwide.org  | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53
61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

Latest Tweet: Recent article published by Global Ground Media #airpollution#globalwarmingsolutions https://t.co/a2cdLpWF7h https://t.co/rwDykD7b9KRead More
    

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 10:16 AM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Hi Biochar Discussion, 

Tom Miles thought you'd be interested in this: 
http://us11.forward-to-friend.com/forward/show?u=8f144122b0cdec505ae434511&id=d5d614fd0a 

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All, please review the final reports from the highly productive Biochar for Sustainable Soils project, especially the Best Practice Guidelines. Let’s build on this successful project. 

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