Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the #feed


Paul S Anderson
 

Charles,

 

Can you or some other reader please succinctly categorize and explain those different purposes?   Or are several different purposes actually each on a continuum between  0% to 100%?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:56 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I agree. All depends on what one is trying to accomplish with your project.  Biochar with compost or compost with biochar.  Both have different purposes.

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Biochar amended composts appears to have improved water retention compared with compost alone, according to people who have been selling those combinations.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 2:41 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Chuck you are exactly correct, re infiltration, aggregation, and WHC. 

 

I’ve built a library of field and saturated water holding capacities, and porosity measurements, for just about every commercially-available biochar, and a wide range of composts.

With few exceptions, compost has higher water holding capacities than biochar. 

 

Biochar’s however have very high air-filled porosities (rather than water-filled porosities).

Rick

 



On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io <chegberg@...> wrote:

 

Actually, WHC of biochar for runoff is a very small part of biochar’s role in reducing runoff.  It actually has greater impact in infiltration modifications and jump starting soil aggregation once installed and compacted soils are broken up.  

Chuck

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "mikethewormguy via Groups.Io" <mikethewormguy@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 3:20 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Robert,

 

If memory serves,  1% Soil Organic Matter will hold a 1 inch rain.  Increasing the nutrient and water holding capacity of periurban/urban soils could have a direct impact on a cities stormwater runoff and its treatment.

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 


Charles Hegberg
 

Hi Paul – I look at what mix to use based on what I am trying to do.

 

For stormwater management and urban soil work with a focus on SWM, I generally use a Biochar + compost.  But this also depends on the pollutants I am trying to remove.  If there are some metals that need to be removed, I might add some manure char.  I would also use a blended mix such as this for green roof material.

 

For gardens, tree plantings and lawns top dressing, I would us a compost + biochar.

 

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 6:09 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Subject: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Charles,

 

Can you or some other reader please succinctly categorize and explain those different purposes?   Or are several different purposes actually each on a continuum between  0% to 100%?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:56 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I agree. All depends on what one is trying to accomplish with your project.  Biochar with compost or compost with biochar.  Both have different purposes.

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Biochar amended composts appears to have improved water retention compared with compost alone, according to people who have been selling those combinations.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 2:41 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Chuck you are exactly correct, re infiltration, aggregation, and WHC. 

 

I’ve built a library of field and saturated water holding capacities, and porosity measurements, for just about every commercially-available biochar, and a wide range of composts.

With few exceptions, compost has higher water holding capacities than biochar. 

 

Biochar’s however have very high air-filled porosities (rather than water-filled porosities).

Rick

 




On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io <chegberg@...> wrote:

 

Actually, WHC of biochar for runoff is a very small part of biochar’s role in reducing runoff.  It actually has greater impact in infiltration modifications and jump starting soil aggregation once installed and compacted soils are broken up.  

Chuck

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "mikethewormguy via Groups.Io" <mikethewormguy@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 3:20 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Robert,

 

If memory serves,  1% Soil Organic Matter will hold a 1 inch rain.  Increasing the nutrient and water holding capacity of periurban/urban soils could have a direct impact on a cities stormwater runoff and its treatment.

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 


Tom Miles
 

At Compost 2020 last month Chargrow, Symsoil, Rexius, Missouri Composting, Cool Planet all described how they modify biochar-compost blends and when and how they incorporate compost and other components. Their applications are for crops and growing media. I don’t think anyone described stormwater. You can buy the recordings for all the conference sessions at US Composting Council for $150. https://www.compostingcouncil.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=15060264

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:09 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Hi Paul – I look at what mix to use based on what I am trying to do.

 

For stormwater management and urban soil work with a focus on SWM, I generally use a Biochar + compost.  But this also depends on the pollutants I am trying to remove.  If there are some metals that need to be removed, I might add some manure char.  I would also use a blended mix such as this for green roof material.

 

For gardens, tree plantings and lawns top dressing, I would us a compost + biochar.

 

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 6:09 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Subject: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Charles,

 

Can you or some other reader please succinctly categorize and explain those different purposes?   Or are several different purposes actually each on a continuum between  0% to 100%?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:56 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I agree. All depends on what one is trying to accomplish with your project.  Biochar with compost or compost with biochar.  Both have different purposes.

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Biochar amended composts appears to have improved water retention compared with compost alone, according to people who have been selling those combinations.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 2:41 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Chuck you are exactly correct, re infiltration, aggregation, and WHC. 

 

I’ve built a library of field and saturated water holding capacities, and porosity measurements, for just about every commercially-available biochar, and a wide range of composts.

With few exceptions, compost has higher water holding capacities than biochar. 

 

Biochar’s however have very high air-filled porosities (rather than water-filled porosities).

Rick

 



On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io <chegberg@...> wrote:

 

Actually, WHC of biochar for runoff is a very small part of biochar’s role in reducing runoff.  It actually has greater impact in infiltration modifications and jump starting soil aggregation once installed and compacted soils are broken up.  

Chuck

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "mikethewormguy via Groups.Io" <mikethewormguy@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 3:20 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Robert,

 

If memory serves,  1% Soil Organic Matter will hold a 1 inch rain.  Increasing the nutrient and water holding capacity of periurban/urban soils could have a direct impact on a cities stormwater runoff and its treatment.

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 


Geoff Thomas
 

Has anyone had any experience with the biochar coming from feeding cows Charcoal? - as potentially a huge application, - in Australia and America much more potential than farming..
Does the Biochar emerging from the ruminant’s rear end still have a high air content? - what about after the Dung beetles have eaten and buried it?

Would the idea of exposing the char to a vacuum still leave a lot of air in the Biochar?

Has particle size a role in these assesments?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 23 Feb 2020, at 11:08 am, Charles Hegberg <chegberg@...> wrote:

Hi Paul – I look at what mix to use based on what I am trying to do.
 
For stormwater management and urban soil work with a focus on SWM, I generally use a Biochar + compost.  But this also depends on the pollutants I am trying to remove.  If there are some metals that need to be removed, I might add some manure char.  I would also use a blended mix such as this for green roof material.
 
For gardens, tree plantings and lawns top dressing, I would us a compost + biochar.
 
 
 
From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 6:09 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Subject: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the
 
Charles,
 
Can you or some other reader please succinctly categorize and explain those different purposes?   Or are several different purposes actually each on a continuum between  0% to 100%?
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP 
     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects
     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits
     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:56 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
I agree. All depends on what one is trying to accomplish with your project.  Biochar with compost or compost with biochar.  Both have different purposes.
 
From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
Biochar amended composts appears to have improved water retention compared with compost alone, according to people who have been selling those combinations.
 
Tom 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 2:41 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
Chuck you are exactly correct, re infiltration, aggregation, and WHC. 
 
I’ve built a library of field and saturated water holding capacities, and porosity measurements, for just about every commercially-available biochar, and a wide range of composts.
With few exceptions, compost has higher water holding capacities than biochar. 
 
Biochar’s however have very high air-filled porosities (rather than water-filled porosities).
Rick
 




On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io <chegberg@...> wrote:
 
Actually, WHC of biochar for runoff is a very small part of biochar’s role in reducing runoff.  It actually has greater impact in infiltration modifications and jump starting soil aggregation once installed and compacted soils are broken up.  
Chuck
 
From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "mikethewormguy via Groups.Io" <mikethewormguy@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 3:20 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
Robert,
 
If memory serves,  1% Soil Organic Matter will hold a 1 inch rain.  Increasing the nutrient and water holding capacity of periurban/urban soils could have a direct impact on a cities stormwater runoff and its treatment.
 
Mike
 
 
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 
 



Paul Belanger
 

AND here we are trying to promote biochar and we gotta pay $150?

besides I could not open until I rebooted https://www.compostingcouncil.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=15060264

 

 

The  other point of this email is about the email below – AND THE LIKE ACROSS THE COUNTRY:

WE ARE NOT GETTING THE WORD OUT ON BIOCHAR AND CCS aspects.

 

The word soil everywhere – 11 ; a few mentions of compost: ONCE

BIOCHAR – ZERO

WE ARE NOT DOING A GOOD JOB; I’m talking on Earth day, 3 to 5 in Coupeville – I welcome slides;

 

I’m in this because sequestration (I don’t care the means – all hands on deck) is MOST important – going EVs and all non-carbon sourced electric generation and manufacturing is NOT going to happen fast enough – besides people do NOT want to change their ways.

e.g. our parents or ourselves? https://grist.org/article/my-parents-love-to-travel-how-do-i-get-them-to-stop/

 

We need to sequester – and if BURN (biochar) is the pathway then there is NOTHING going on in ANY meaningful scale. Incentivize farmers/educate them etc. etc.

 

·        And in this 2 hours episode a VERY CURIOUS STATEMENT is made that maybe AI will come up with unforeseen solutions for addressing climate change: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dZ_lvDgevk&feature=youtu.be – that would be nice.

·        Can we survive the revolution? The loss of jobs – the benefits for industry but not the individual?

  • like in China people pay by facial recognition – and driverless autos too. And public shaming of jaywalkers by facial recognition, ID and posting public messages – talk to your friends on FB about government in their lives!
  • And driverless trucks in the US – CA to AZ – but also how it’s led to the wealth discrepancy and loss of blue collar jobs and decent pay (not just jobs going overseas.
  • Google searching you vs you searching google etc.

·         

 

 

Paul

 

Paul Belanger, Geologist/Paleoclimatologist, Ph.D.

http://denverclimatestudygroup.com/ and on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/denverclimatestudygroup/

pebelanger@...

2276 Mariner Beach Dr., Oak Harbor, WA 98277

c. 303-249-7966; h 303-526-7996

“People who say in cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it!”

George Bernard Shaw

 

 

 


From: Transition Fidalgo and Friends <info@...>
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 11:02:01 AM
To: Paul Belanger <PEBELANGER@...>
Subject: The Pathfinder - February 2020

 

Your February 2020 Pathfinder Newsletter
 

 

View this email in your browser

Reflection

      Years ago I read about workers at a factory in Ballard who tossed hundreds of glass hearts into the surf on Valentine’s Day. They hoped that now and then a heart would be found by someone in need of such a gift.
      Thinking of that now, I’m reminded how gifts from the natural world are constantly washing up at our feet, especially at winter’s end, when needed most.
      “Saw one pink salmonberry bloom,” a friend once emailed in early spring, “ringing its dinner bell for hummers.” That was all, and really, what more was needed? It was one of those lines, along with “the frog chorus started tonight,” or “the swallows are back,” that serves as shorthand for “a heart washed up today.”

Image courtesy of Jack Hartt
      A few heart-gifts, like the first blooms of the salmonberry and the red-flowering currant, are cast in shades of red, igniting the island with the promise of returning warmth.
     Flame-throated hummingbirds wing in from over 2000 miles away, and the red-winged blackbird flashes another seasonal heart. For at least one veteran birder, “spring arrives the day the epaulets flare.” The males’ scarlet shoulder patches, often concealed by dark plumage, show boldly when the birds stake out breeding territories. Check out any island marsh in early spring and you’ll find it lit by wing-fire.
     While deeply grateful for such gifts, I can't help but despair at how regularly these days joy in the natural world is partnered with heart-rending loss. I'm thinking now about one of our local seabirds, the lovely common murre. Last month, a study shared the devastating news that nearly a
million murres died in 2015-2016 due to overheated waters in the North Pacific. Thousands of bodies washed up on beaches along the west coast and on to Alaska.  
     One of the tasks of these times, it seems, is to learn how to live in the space between unimaginable beauty and unbearable sorrow. To live without losing heart.
     Which takes me back to those Ballard folks standing on a beach and flinging their ruby gifts into the water.
   “We do it,” said the factory owner, “because sometimes people need to be reminded of all the love in the world.”

Read on for some Good News; The Way of Why Not: World's First Mobile Library of Things;   How to Help: Carbon Gardening and more;  and Climate Updates.


 

 

Note: as you read the sections below, you will find embedded hyperlinks that are blue and underlined.

 

Yes, there’s good news

Nudges could drive rapid decarbonization: Sweeping change can happen fast, in areas both practical (e.g the spread of smartphones in the last decade) and profound (e.g. the rise of abolitionism in Britain). But can it happen with decarbonization? An analysis published Jan. 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the answer is yes. Seemingly small "tipping points" can trigger large, rapid change. “It is increasingly recognized that business-as-usual technological progress and carbon pricing alone are not likely to lead to rapid and deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.” Instead, decarbonization is more likely to come from six relatively small interventions that could help shove the whole global system onto a more sustainable track.   Read more here


Image courtesy of Anthropocene Magazine

Simple trick could cut climate impact of flying: Changing the flight paths of just a few planes could slash the contribution of contrails to global warming by three-fifths, according to a new study in Environmental Science and Technology. Contrails contribute roughly as much to global warming as planes’ carbon emissions do, though just 2% of flights are responsible for 80% of the impact. If these planes changed their flight paths slightly, this could reduce the warming effect of contrails by 59%. Cleaner engines alone could reduce the climate impact of contrails by nearly 69%. And the combination of cleaner engines and tweaking flight paths could cut the overall climate impact of aviation by more than half.  Read more here

Many support climate activism: A new report – Climate Activism: Beliefs, Attitudes, and Behaviors – shows that 51% of Americans would vote for candidates because of their position on global warming; 31% would support a group engaging in non-violent civil disobedience against corporate or government activities that worsen global warming; and 20% would personally engage in non-violent civil disobedience. These and other findings are reported by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication.  Read more here

NYC will ban all new fossil-fuel projects: Mayor Bill de Blasio announced New York City’s intention to stop all new fossil-fuel projects within and serving the city. This is the largest municipal ban announcement of its kind globally.  Read more here

Solar device makes seawater drinkable: Scientists report in Energy and Environmental Science that they can make seawater drinkable without using electricity. So long as the sun is shining, their device will produce enough high-quality potable water to cover a family's needs, at a cost of around $100. Testing their prototype on a roof at MIT, they produced more than 1.5 gallons of fresh drinking water every hour for every square meter of solar-collecting area.  Read more here

Lawmakers vote to block drilling: On Feb. 4, Democratic lawmakers in Virginia passed a bill to block future oil and gas development off the state’s coastline, opposing the Trump administration’s efforts to open Atlantic waters to fossil-fuel exploration. California has also banned new oil and gas infrastructure in state waters since the administration proposed in 2018 to open up the Atlantic, Pacific and new parts of the Arctic oceans to offshore drilling.  Read more here

Farmers tackle climate change: A major contributor to Canada’s greenhouse-gas emissions is agriculture. At the same time, farmers are being hit by some of the worst effects of climate change. Now, a coalition of farming groups says they can be a part of the solution. "Farmers for Climate Solutions" is calling for agricultural policy to be redesigned with a climate-change lens placed over the entire framework. That means boosting the efforts of farmers to reduce emissions, enhance soil health, and increase resilience to extreme weather.  Read more here

Biofabrication works with nature: Thanks to a reader for sending in two brief, fascinating talks by experts in the field of bio-fabrication. The first is by a clothing designer, the second by a scientist. The idea of working with nature instead of against it may be a world-saving idea, and the technology is here right now.  Read more here   and read more here
 

 

The Way of Why Not:
World's first mobile library of things
   
    Here's where we ask "What if?" and "Why Not?" We highlight "new-world-building" projects happening elsewhere, in hopes of stirring the imagination and prompting action in our own community.

    This time we look at how a town in England is cutting consumption and reducing waste by giving people the chance to "borrow, not buy."


Image courtesy of Resilience.org

    The Share Shed is a "library of things" in Totnes, England, where over 350 items are available for members of the project to borrow at a nominal fee. Share Shed’s collection includes camping and gardening equipment, tools, musical instruments, household appliances, bicycles, sewing machines, and baby items, to name just a few.
    After watching people come in from nearby towns to borrow equipment they didn’t require regularly, Share Shed coordinators began to think about putting their library on the road to make borrowing easier and more accessible for all.
    Share Shed's manager says, “Everybody we meet seems to understand the concept of ‘borrow, don’t buy’, and it’s a great feeling when we can help somebody out with the things they need to complete a task, be it putting up a shelf, or getting a house ready for a sale. Expanding this possibility to other villages, and facilitating even more sharing seems like a great and exciting next step for us.”
    Share Shed eventually came up with a proposal to serve not just Totnes, but three neighboring towns. The Mayor of one of those towns was delighted. "We’re a small town and lack many facilities. Our inhabitants are often isolated or on low incomes. Sharing tools and other equipment is a natural response to empower people and to build connections, and I’m keen to support the Share Shed in any way I can.”
    Currently, the Share Shed team is working to convert a vehicle to start supporting nearby areas beginning in April 2020. There 's already a great amount of interest focused on how the venture is evolving, and hopes are this new model will be replicated globally, fulfilling the needs of those who would rather share than own.
   Read more here


 

 


How to Help:
"Carbon Gardening" and more

Carbon Gardening: Scientists calculate that methods such as managing land for carbon sequestration by restoring ecosystems, and changing agricultural and gardening practices, could draw down over a third of global carbon emissions by 2030, while also strengthening biodiversity, managing water, and mitigating pollution.
    We can help further those goals in our own yards and gardens. It all starts with the soil—almost anything done to improve soil health and structure will also increase carbon retention. Adding compost, mulching appropriately in beds and around trees, and reducing digging and tilling are fundamental to building soil that has good texture and can store carbon both short and long-term.
    But wait, there's more. Carbon gardeners should also focus on letting plants and the soil form a thriving community. Maximum carbon storage occurs when multiple plant species with similar needs interact with each other, other organisms, and the denizens of the living soil in which they grow. The relationships among these community members create and maintain the conditions they need in order to flourish, and to enable carbon sequestration.
    Learn to think like a butterfly or bird or oak and assess your garden with an eye to what these beings might need to thrive, then make needed changes. Make ecological functionality the premise from which all other decisions flow.
    Strategies for community-building in the garden include choosing plants with similar requirements that suit the site and soil, and won't require high-carbon inputs such as synthetic fertilizer and mowing. Nor would a carbon-storing design call for weekly watering, leaving soil bare through the winter, or growing water-dependent ornamentals. Any plant mix should aim for at least 80% native plants.
    If you have an established garden, there's no need to rip everything out and start over. Careful assessment and changes such as adding native trees and bushes and surrounding them with a living mulch of low-growing perennials so they can form a community will help carbon storage. Soil will start improving rapidly near the surface, while the downward percolation of soluble organic matter and its conversion to stable soil carbon will take longer.  Read more here
    



Image courtesy of Toni Genberg/ Yes Magazine

Save the insects: Roughly 90% of plant-eating insects will eat and reproduce only on certain native plant species, specifically those with whom they share an evolutionary history. Without these carefully-tuned adaptations of specific plants, insect populations suffer. And that has consequences on up the food chain, because insects are a key food source for birds, rodents, amphibians, and others. To support them and other wildlife with a yard teeming with native plants, we'll need to stop swooning over large swaths of low-cut grass, a preference known as “savanna syndrome.” Open grasslands allowed our ancestors to spy predators, so even today, on a deep level, we feel safer when we can see unobstructed. But those lawns require huge quantities of water and often chemical treatments—not to mention the emissions from two-cycle lawnmowers. (EPA: running a mower for one hour emits as much pollution as driving a typical car 100 miles.) But it doesn't need to be all or nothing to make a difference—if you need some grass and non-natives, just try for about three-quarters native plants. The National Wildlife Federation can help with a native plant finder web tool that allows users to plug in a ZIP code to find trees, shrubs, and plants native to their region.   Read more here

Support bumblebees: As you'll see in the Climate Updates, bumblebees are now on the decline due to extreme temperatures. To help them out, leave fallen logs or leaf piles on the ground, which can create shelter and shade during extreme heat events. They may reward you by pollinating crops other bees often can't. Bumbles "buzz-pollinate," which means when they land on a bloom, they vibrate the entire flower. “Think of it like the pollen is stuck in a little salt shaker, and the bees need to shake the pollen at a certain frequency to get the pollen out of the salt shaker.” Unlike most plants, crops such as tomatoes and blueberries keep their pollen tucked away, and need a little shaking up to produce.  Read more here

Send in the mason bees: A reader who "rents" bees writes that "I’ve been 'hiring' these mason and leafcutter bees for a number of years now. It makes me feel good to know I’m helping to enlarge their numbers. And the whole pickup/drop off can be done by mail." Mason bees are solitary bees that fly during springtime, pollinating early bloomers such as fruit trees, some berry bushes, and many native plants. Instead of living in a hive, they use small cavities such as woodpecker holes, tree stumps, and rockeries to lay their eggs in.  For more info on renting the bees' services, go to https://www.rentmasonbees.com/

 

Climate Updates: ...because we need to know

How the world warmed in 2019: A number of records for the Earth’s climate were set in 2019, including: the second or third warmest year on record for surface temperature – and the warmest year without a major El Niño event; warmest year on record for ocean heat content; record lows in sea ice extent and volume in the Arctic and Antarctic for much of the time between April and August; minimum Arctic sea ice extent reached in September tied for the second lowest on record; global sea levels and atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations reached new record highs.  Read more here

Emissions flat in 2019: Global energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide remained steady last year, with declines in rich countries balancing out a rise in poor nations, according to data published Feb. 11 by the International Energy Agency. “This was primarily due to declining emissions from electricity generation in advanced economies, thanks to the expanding role of renewable sources (mainly wind and solar), fuel switching from coal to natural gas, and higher nuclear power generation. Other factors included milder weather in several countries, and slower economic growth in some emerging markets.”  Read more here

Ocean currents speeding up: New research in Science Advances found that 76% of the top 2,000 meters of the ocean appears to have sped up since the 1990s, largely because of wind speeds. This speedup is more than can be explained by natural variability. Between 1990-2013, the energy of these currents increased by 15% per decade, "a really huge increase." A faster, more turbulent ocean could absorb more heat from the atmosphere, and change how and where heat is circulated. "Perhaps the most important consequence is the increased redistribution of heat around the planet that stronger circulation would bring. This would affect temperature distributions and could affect weather patterns — but more work would be needed to make these links."   Read more here

Rivers in the sky: Climate change is spurring a new, deep dive into a complex weather system blamed for extreme flood damage across the western U.S. Atmospheric rivers are narrow ribbons of concentrated moisture that originate in the Pacific and can flow thousands of miles before dropping rain and snow on land.  “Hurricane hunter” planes are set to fly at least 12 missions directly into the systems to gather a wide range of meteorological data. At the same time, 100 new ocean buoys will monitor how the systems form. The goal: Better warning processes to stave off flooding. “If you’re ever wondering how six feet of snow can fall in the Cascades in one day, this is exactly how all that moisture is transported.”   Read more here

Huge iceberg breaks off glacier: Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier are the gateway to a massive cache of frozen water, one that would raise global sea levels by four feet if it were all to spill into the sea. That gateway is shattering. In February, satellites spotted a significant breakup underway on Pine Island Glacier’s floating ice shelf, the latest in a string of calving events that scientists fear may lead to an even larger disintegration. With temperatures on the Antarctic Peninsula recently spiking, signs of rapid transformation are becoming difficult to ignore. Since 2012, the Pine Island glacier has shed 58 billion tons of ice a year, making the biggest single contribution to global sea-level rise of any ice stream on the planet. The latest breakup is the seventh of the past century for Pine Island. The intervals between  events seem to be getting shorter, another symptom of the glacier’s unhealthy state.   Read more here

Temperature in Antarctica nears 70: A weather research station in the Antarctic Peninsula registered a temperature of 69.3 degrees on Feb. 9. The World Meteorological Organization is reviewing that reading to see whether it qualifies as the continent’s hottest temperature on record. Many questions must be answered before the reading is considered the hottest temperature yet recorded on the coldest continent.  Read more here

CO2 concentration hits record high: The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere hit a record high of 416.08 on Feb. 10. The U.K's Met Office warned in January that "a forecast of the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide shows that 2020 will witness one of the largest annual rises in concentration since measurements began at Mauna Loa, in Hawaii, 1958." Further, it said "the atmospheric concentration of CO2 is expected to peak above 417 parts per million in May," noting that the anticipated increase is due in part to emissions from the Australian bushfires.   Read more here

Sea-level rise speeding up along most of U.S. coast: That's the conclusion of William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science latest annual sea-level "report card" that measures tide gauges at 32 locations along the U.S. coast. At 25 of the 32 sites, sea-level rise accelerated at higher rates in 2019 than it did in 2018. NOAA has said that if greenhouse emissions are not reduced, sea levels could rise 8.2 feet from 2000 levels by 2100.   Read more here

Climate change linked to locust invasion: Climate change may be powering the swarms of desert locusts that have invaded eastern Africa, ravaging crops, decimating pastures and deepening a hunger crisis. Hundreds of millions of the insects have swept over the Horn of Africa in the worst outbreak in a quarter of a century. The hungry swarms threaten to exacerbate food insecurity in a region where up to 25 million people are reeling from three consecutive years of droughts and floods. Swarms formed after cyclones dumped vast amounts of rain in the deserts of Oman - creating perfect breeding conditions. “We know that cyclones are the originators of swarms - and in the past 10 years, there’s been an increase in the frequency of cyclones in the Indian Ocean.”   Read more here


Image courtesy of Louis Lliboutry [top]; Alex Cattan and Marc Turrel

Andes meltdown: Across the Andes, glaciers have lost nearly 3 feet in thickness annually since 2000, according to recent research in Nature Geoscience. 98% of Andean glaciers have shrunk this century, a loss with global repercussions. Nearly all the world’s ice is locked up in the vast ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland, with lower-latitude mountain glaciers and ice caps making up only 4% of the world’s land ice area. But because the world’s mountain glaciers — including in the Andes, the Himalayas, and others— are melting so rapidly, they've been responsible for a disproportionate share of global sea-level rise in recent decades. No mountain region has lost more ice, relative to its size, than the Andes.   Read more here

UW summarizes climate impact on state's water: A new summary published by the UW’s Climate Impacts Group consolidated a September report from the IPCC and localized it for the state, showing how the state could be swept up in global changes to both oceans and the cryosphere (Earth’s frozen regions). In Washington, nearly 70% of the population lives along the coast. As the planet’s average temperature has risen by about 1.8C since pre-industrial times, the oceans have absorbed much of the heat, raising sea levels roughly 6 inches between 1902-2015. Ice sheets at the poles have also retreated quickly, and nearly half of all coastal wetlands have been destroyed over the last 100 years. Between 2014-2016, a “blob” of unusually warm water off the West Coast resulted in seabird and marine mammal die-offs. Also in 2015, a drought led to 17 major crops experiencing reduced yields from limited water. By 2040, it’s expected that sea-surface temperature off Washington’s coasts will increase by about 2.2F compared to the 1970-1999 average, making  dangerous algae blooms more likely. North Cascade glaciers also decreased by more than half between 1900-2009, which could increase water scarcity for crops. Average statewide snowpack is projected to decline under current emissions projections by up to 70% by the 2080s. More winter precipitation will likely fall as rain, increasing winter flood risks.   Read more here

Climate refugees cannot be sent back home: A UN panel has ruled that refugees fleeing the effects of the climate crisis cannot be forced to return home by their adoptive countries, a landmark decision that could open the door to a flood of legal claims by displaced people around the world.   Read more here

Climate crisis could cause a third of species to disappear within 50 years: According to a study published mid-February in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the climate crisis could cause the extinction of 30% of the world's plant and animal species by 2070, even accounting for species' abilities to disperse and shift their niches to tolerate hotter temperatures.   Read more here

Bumblebees disappearing due to heat: Extreme temps are driving a dramatic decline in bumblebees across North America and Europe, according to a new study in Science. Researchers looked at half a million records showing where the bees have been found since 1901, across 66 different species. They found that in places where bumblebees have lived in North America, you’re about half as likely to see one today. The decline is especially pronounced in Mexico, where bumblebees once lived in abundance.   Read more here

Researchers tackle acidification with new seaweeds: Seaweeds growing in the ocean pull CO2 from the water for photosynthesis, much as trees pull CO2 from the air. There's an opportunity in that. Shellfish growers in Washington state have struggled with ocean acidification, which can prevent baby oysters from forming shells. One company on Hood Canal has devoted five acres to an experiment that's now a commercial operation, growing kelp along with oysters on lines to see if that co-culture can benefit both.    Read more here


Image courtesy of State of Mato Grosso, Brazil
Amazon deforestation hits record: Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon rainforest more than doubled in January compared with the previous year, according to official data published Feb. 7. More than 110 square miles were cleared, an increase of 108%. It was the largest area cleared in the month of January since 2015, when such data started being collected. The sharp increase overlapped the first year in office of President  Bolsonaro, a climate-change skeptic who has eased restrictions on exploiting the Amazon's riches, and who recently unveiled a plan for the rainforest that would open indigenous lands to mining, farming and hydroelectric power projects.   Read more here

Planting trees won’t save us: The trillion-tree idea to fight climate change won wide attention last summer after a study in Science concluded that planting so many trees was “the most effective climate change solution to date.” In a sharp rebuttal to the paper, five scientists wrote that the study’s findings were inconsistent with the dynamics of the global carbon cycle. "The claim that global tree restoration is our most effective climate solution is simply incorrect scientifically and dangerously misleading.” When it comes to reducing emissions fast, the group said, focus on regulating carbon pollution to net zero by 2050 and making clean energy available to everyone.   Read more here

 

The Pathfinder is compiled and edited by Evelyn Adams.


 

 

 

Copyright © 2020 by Transition Fidalgo and Friends
All rights reserved.



Our mailing address is:
Transition Fidalgo and Friends
PO Box 62
Anacortes, WA 98221

 

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:55 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: 'Anderson, Paul' <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

At Compost 2020 last month Chargrow, Symsoil, Rexius, Missouri Composting, Cool Planet all described how they modify biochar-compost blends and when and how they incorporate compost and other components. Their applications are for crops and growing media. I don’t think anyone described stormwater. You can buy the recordings for all the conference sessions at US Composting Council for $150. https://www.compostingcouncil.org/store/ViewProduct.aspx?id=15060264

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg
Sent: Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:09 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Hi Paul – I look at what mix to use based on what I am trying to do.

 

For stormwater management and urban soil work with a focus on SWM, I generally use a Biochar + compost.  But this also depends on the pollutants I am trying to remove.  If there are some metals that need to be removed, I might add some manure char.  I would also use a blended mix such as this for green roof material.

 

For gardens, tree plantings and lawns top dressing, I would us a compost + biochar.

 

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Reply-To: "
main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 6:09 PM
To: "
main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Paul Anderson <
psanders@...>
Subject: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Charles,

 

Can you or some other reader please succinctly categorize and explain those different purposes?   Or are several different purposes actually each on a continuum between  0% to 100%?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:56 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I agree. All depends on what one is trying to accomplish with your project.  Biochar with compost or compost with biochar.  Both have different purposes.

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Reply-To: "
main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM
To: "
main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Biochar amended composts appears to have improved water retention compared with compost alone, according to people who have been selling those combinations.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 2:41 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Chuck you are exactly correct, re infiltration, aggregation, and WHC. 

 

I’ve built a library of field and saturated water holding capacities, and porosity measurements, for just about every commercially-available biochar, and a wide range of composts.

With few exceptions, compost has higher water holding capacities than biochar. 

 

Biochar’s however have very high air-filled porosities (rather than water-filled porosities).

Rick

 

 

On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io <chegberg@...> wrote:

 

Actually, WHC of biochar for runoff is a very small part of biochar’s role in reducing runoff.  It actually has greater impact in infiltration modifications and jump starting soil aggregation once installed and compacted soils are broken up.  

Chuck

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "mikethewormguy via Groups.Io" <mikethewormguy@...>
Reply-To: "
main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 3:20 PM
To: Biochar Group <
main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %

 

Robert,

 

If memory serves,  1% Soil Organic Matter will hold a 1 inch rain.  Increasing the nutrient and water holding capacity of periurban/urban soils could have a direct impact on a cities stormwater runoff and its treatment.

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

 


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi geoff


Doug Pow has been doing it for nearly 7 years now.  We did an analysis of the dung.

Also just finished a studiy with melissa Rebbeck  (go to her web site)

Regards
Stephen

On Sun, Feb 23, 2020 at 3:08 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Has anyone had any experience with the biochar coming from feeding cows Charcoal? - as potentially a huge application, - in Australia and America much more potential than farming..
Does the Biochar emerging from the ruminant’s rear end still have a high air content? - what about after the Dung beetles have eaten and buried it?

Would the idea of exposing the char to a vacuum still leave a lot of air in the Biochar?

Has particle size a role in these assesments?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 23 Feb 2020, at 11:08 am, Charles Hegberg <chegberg@...> wrote:

Hi Paul – I look at what mix to use based on what I am trying to do.
 
For stormwater management and urban soil work with a focus on SWM, I generally use a Biochar + compost.  But this also depends on the pollutants I am trying to remove.  If there are some metals that need to be removed, I might add some manure char.  I would also use a blended mix such as this for green roof material.
 
For gardens, tree plantings and lawns top dressing, I would us a compost + biochar.
 
 
 
From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 6:09 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Cc: Paul Anderson <psanders@...>
Subject: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the
 
Charles,
 
Can you or some other reader please succinctly categorize and explain those different purposes?   Or are several different purposes actually each on a continuum between  0% to 100%?
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP 
     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects
     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits
     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:56 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
I agree. All depends on what one is trying to accomplish with your project.  Biochar with compost or compost with biochar.  Both have different purposes.
 
From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Miles <tmiles@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
Biochar amended composts appears to have improved water retention compared with compost alone, according to people who have been selling those combinations.
 
Tom 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2020 2:41 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
Chuck you are exactly correct, re infiltration, aggregation, and WHC. 
 
I’ve built a library of field and saturated water holding capacities, and porosity measurements, for just about every commercially-available biochar, and a wide range of composts.
With few exceptions, compost has higher water holding capacities than biochar. 
 
Biochar’s however have very high air-filled porosities (rather than water-filled porosities).
Rick
 




On Feb 20, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Charles Hegberg via Groups.Io <chegberg@...> wrote:
 
Actually, WHC of biochar for runoff is a very small part of biochar’s role in reducing runoff.  It actually has greater impact in infiltration modifications and jump starting soil aggregation once installed and compacted soils are broken up.  
Chuck
 
From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "mikethewormguy via Groups.Io" <mikethewormguy@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 3:20 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] How to Calculate the Amount of biochar needed to raise soil carbon %
 
Robert,
 
If memory serves,  1% Soil Organic Matter will hold a 1 inch rain.  Increasing the nutrient and water holding capacity of periurban/urban soils could have a direct impact on a cities stormwater runoff and its treatment.
 
Mike
 
 
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 
 



Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Stephen, I always had problems with the "Biochar was mixed with molasses and fed directly to cows. The dung-biochar mixture was incorporated into the soil profile by dung beetles. We studied the changes in soil properties over 3 years. Biochar extracted from fresh dung and from the soil to a depth of 40 cm was characterised. A preliminary financial analysis of the costs and benefits of this integrated approach was also undertaken. The preliminary investigation results suggested that this strategy was effective in improving soil properties and increasing returns to the farmer. It was also concluded that the biochar adsorbed nutrients from the cow's gut and from the dung. Dung beetles could transport this nutrient-rich biochar into the soil profile. There was little evidence that the recalcitrant component of the biochar was reduced through reactions inside the gut or on/in the soil. Further research is required to quantify the long-term impact of integrating biochar and dung beetles into the rearing of cows.

I looked up the Melissa Redbank person, - looked nice but no easily acessible material, - perhaps you could suggest a web address rather than lotsa newshounds?

Doug Pow’s work is incredibly important, imho, you may recall my analysis suggesting 12% of Australian green house gasses, - very conservative given Methane = 70 to 90% more destructive than C02, could be saved. 
Should i go for extremist statements? or should I go for a conservative number, - damned if you do, damned if you don’t, - have you any answers to my questions please?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 23 Feb 2020, at 3:02 pm, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

Rebbeck


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Geoff

We didnt measure methane emissions so you can't make any statements from Dougs work.  Yes if we ad funding there are many measurements we could take and look at emissions and carbon build up.

Melissa has a web site with her presentations


Regards
Stephen





On Sun, Feb 23, 2020 at 6:16 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Stephen, I always had problems with the "Biochar was mixed with molasses and fed directly to cows. The dung-biochar mixture was incorporated into the soil profile by dung beetles. We studied the changes in soil properties over 3 years. Biochar extracted from fresh dung and from the soil to a depth of 40 cm was characterised. A preliminary financial analysis of the costs and benefits of this integrated approach was also undertaken. The preliminary investigation results suggested that this strategy was effective in improving soil properties and increasing returns to the farmer. It was also concluded that the biochar adsorbed nutrients from the cow's gut and from the dung. Dung beetles could transport this nutrient-rich biochar into the soil profile. There was little evidence that the recalcitrant component of the biochar was reduced through reactions inside the gut or on/in the soil. Further research is required to quantify the long-term impact of integrating biochar and dung beetles into the rearing of cows.

I looked up the Melissa Redbank person, - looked nice but no easily acessible material, - perhaps you could suggest a web address rather than lotsa newshounds?

Doug Pow’s work is incredibly important, imho, you may recall my analysis suggesting 12% of Australian green house gasses, - very conservative given Methane = 70 to 90% more destructive than C02, could be saved. 
Should i go for extremist statements? or should I go for a conservative number, - damned if you do, damned if you don’t, - have you any answers to my questions please?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 23 Feb 2020, at 3:02 pm, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

Rebbeck


mikethewormguy
 

Tom,

Did you find that there any consistency among the composting companies regarding when during composting process that the biochar was added....?

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Tom Miles
 

Each has a different strategy of blending, preprocessing, or additives (e.g. minerals, biologicals)  depending on the product, the blend, and whether they want a bacteria rich or fungi rich soil amendment. It’s pretty clear in their presentations. It ranges from simple to more complex as they develop products for higher end markets. Of course they don’t tell all. : - )

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of mikethewormguy via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 12:22 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Tom,

 

Did you find that there any consistency among the composting companies regarding when during composting process that the biochar was added....?

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 


mikethewormguy
 

Tom,

There are a myriad ways that biochar can potentiate compost.....

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Tom Miles
 

At Compost 2020 it was impressive to hear five commercial producers talk about how they successfully use biochar as a principal component (85% biochar), equal blend (50% biochar), or enhancement (5%-20% Biochar) to compost. (Success is measured in repeat sales over several years.) In addition we heard four principal investigators describe laboratory and field research with combinations for specific applications such as ammonia capture from composting, or mine soil remediation.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of mikethewormguy via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, February 23, 2020 4:33 PM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Different purposes. RE: [Biochar] How to Calculate the

 

Tom,

 

There are a myriad ways that biochar can potentiate compost.....

 

Mike

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 


Rick Wilson
 

In a Gore, or CASP composting system, which are the technologies being deployed in California to address SB 1383 (to make sure odors are addressed),
The organic waste feedstock is installed at the beginning of a 30-day step.  So the only option would be to put the material into the pile at the end of the process.

Rick



On Feb 23, 2020, at 12:22 PM, mikethewormguy via Groups.Io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:

Tom,

Did you find that there any consistency among the composting companies regarding when during composting process that the biochar was added....?

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



mikethewormguy
 

Rick,

It all starts with WHY is the composter using biochar.  If the case for the biochar answers a pivotal issue for a composter than they will figure our where, when, and how much to add.   

Mike



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Rick Wilson
 

Mike, the composter actually has no interest in biochar.  They are not in the business. 
I have remit to conduct experiments to enhance the efficiency of the process (as a consultant)  I am trying to confirm what many people have told me.

"Adding biochar increase maturity (time to completion is reduced)"

Reducing time to maturity has value to a compost operator if it works (read they may pay something for the biochar to increase the throughput of their facilities)

I am also going to test the hypothesis that the microbial population will be move developed by adding compost. 

These experiments will be repeated 6X (as in science, it needs to be measured and repeated).  Statistics will enable us to make definitive claims, one way or the other. 

Rick

On Feb 24, 2020, at 1:50 PM, mikethewormguy via Groups.Io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:

Rick,

It all starts with WHY is the composter using biochar.  If the case for the biochar answers a pivotal issue for a composter than they will figure our where, when, and how much to add.   

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Jim Bartlett
 

Rick,
Just curious, what parameter(s) is used to determine compost completion?
Volatile solids reduction?
Pathogen reduction?
Visual characteristics?

Thanks, 
jb

Sent from my mobile

On Feb 24, 2020, at 4:24 PM, Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012@...> wrote:

Mike, the composter actually has no interest in biochar.  They are not in the business. 
I have remit to conduct experiments to enhance the efficiency of the process (as a consultant)  I am trying to confirm what many people have told me.

"Adding biochar increase maturity (time to completion is reduced)"

Reducing time to maturity has value to a compost operator if it works (read they may pay something for the biochar to increase the throughput of their facilities)

I am also going to test the hypothesis that the microbial population will be move developed by adding compost. 

These experiments will be repeated 6X (as in science, it needs to be measured and repeated).  Statistics will enable us to make definitive claims, one way or the other. 

Rick

On Feb 24, 2020, at 1:50 PM, mikethewormguy via Groups.Io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:

Rick,

It all starts with WHY is the composter using biochar.  If the case for the biochar answers a pivotal issue for a composter than they will figure our where, when, and how much to add.   

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



mikethewormguy
 

Rick,

You may want to consider.........

1. Coating you biochar in molasses before adding it to the compost pile.

2. Measure the volume reduction in the pile as your proof of concept parameter ...


How are you assuring uniform mixing of the biochar in the pile when first added....?

Have you considered adding biochar to the curing phase of the composting cycle in addition to at the start....?


my 2 cents.....

Mike




Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Rick Wilson
 

Solvita maturity index. 

On Monday, February 24, 2020, 08:32:13 PM PST, mikethewormguy via Groups.Io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:


Rick,

You may want to consider.........

1. Coating you biochar in molasses before adding it to the compost pile.

2. Measure the volume reduction in the pile as your proof of concept parameter ...


How are you assuring uniform mixing of the biochar in the pile when first added....?

Have you considered adding biochar to the curing phase of the composting cycle in addition to at the start....?


my 2 cents.....

Mike




Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


mikethewormguy
 

Joseph,

Has David Pow done any work with kelp coated biochar, as a feed supplement.

Kelp is a fine prebiotic.......... 

Mike



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mikethewormguy
 

Rick,

Two simple tests for compost maturity are using earthworms and planting grass seed.  These are "go / no-go" tests that can provide actionable data at an affordable cost.....

They can be done prior to doing a Solvay test.....

my 2 cents......

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone