Topics

BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA #cocoa #ghana


ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA
 

Hi folks,

 

I’m Adam from Ghana. I feel honored to be accepted into this august community. My company has recently commenced the production of biochar, Wood Vinegar and Charcoal briquettes near Kumasi using sawdust and rice husk (unlimited supplies available) as feedstock. In the face of limited marketing opportunities at this early stage, one of our prime targets is the cocoa sector (cocoa is the main forex earner for Ghana).

 

According to the Ghana Cocoa Board, studies have shown that soil acidity is one of the major constraints on cocoa cultivation as it limits the levels of key nutrients such as Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus in the soil. This leads to low cocoa yields, thereby affecting farmers’ income. The problem is prevalent especially in the Western Regions of Ghana where 70% of the cocoa is produced. To resolve the problem of soil acidity, the Ghana Cocobod has lately introduce a chemical soil conditioner (Omya Calciprill) to farmers in the cocoa sector. Omya Calciprill is imported using scarce forex.

 

Currently we are planning to introduce biochar to the Ghana Cocobod as a better, low cost alternative to chemical soil conditioners to address the problem of soil acidity. To this end, I’d be grateful to receive any info, data, studies, reports, etc. establishing the positive effects of biochar on acidic soils, particular in connection with tropical crops such as cocoa.

 

Warmest regards.


Paul S Anderson
 

What is the range (and average) of soil pH in the target areas?

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:09 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Hi folks,

I’m Adam from Ghana. I feel honored to be accepted into this august community. My company has recently commenced the production of biochar, Wood Vinegar and Charcoal briquettes near Kumasi using sawdust and rice husk (unlimited supplies available) as feedstock. In the face of limited marketing opportunities at this early stage, one of our prime targets is the cocoa sector (cocoa is the main forex earner for Ghana).

 

According to the Ghana Cocoa Board, studies have shown that soil acidity is one of the major constraints on cocoa cultivation as it limits the levels of key nutrients such as Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus in the soil. This leads to low cocoa yields, thereby affecting farmers’ income. The problem is prevalent especially in the Western Regions of Ghana where 70% of the cocoa is produced. To resolve the problem of soil acidity, the Ghana Cocobod has lately introduce a chemical soil conditioner (Omya Calciprill) to farmers in the cocoa sector. Omya Calciprill is imported using scarce forex.

 

Currently we are planning to introduce biochar to the Ghana Cocobod as a better, low cost alternative to chemical soil conditioners to address the problem of soil acidity. To this end, I’d be grateful to receive any info, data, studies, reports, etc. establishing the positive effects of biochar on acidic soils, particular in connection with tropical crops such as cocoa.

 

Warmest regards.


abraham abyslo
 

Welcome here,Alhaji. I am in Lagos State of Nigeria.


On Sun, Mar 15, 2020, 17:41 Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

What is the range (and average) of soil pH in the target areas?

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:09 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Hi folks,

I’m Adam from Ghana. I feel honored to be accepted into this august community. My company has recently commenced the production of biochar, Wood Vinegar and Charcoal briquettes near Kumasi using sawdust and rice husk (unlimited supplies available) as feedstock. In the face of limited marketing opportunities at this early stage, one of our prime targets is the cocoa sector (cocoa is the main forex earner for Ghana).

 

According to the Ghana Cocoa Board, studies have shown that soil acidity is one of the major constraints on cocoa cultivation as it limits the levels of key nutrients such as Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus in the soil. This leads to low cocoa yields, thereby affecting farmers’ income. The problem is prevalent especially in the Western Regions of Ghana where 70% of the cocoa is produced. To resolve the problem of soil acidity, the Ghana Cocobod has lately introduce a chemical soil conditioner (Omya Calciprill) to farmers in the cocoa sector. Omya Calciprill is imported using scarce forex.

 

Currently we are planning to introduce biochar to the Ghana Cocobod as a better, low cost alternative to chemical soil conditioners to address the problem of soil acidity. To this end, I’d be grateful to receive any info, data, studies, reports, etc. establishing the positive effects of biochar on acidic soils, particular in connection with tropical crops such as cocoa.

 

Warmest regards.


ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA
 

The range of the soil pH is from 4.57–5.12 in the top 0-15 cm ( falls below 5.7–7.2 reported to be normal for cocoa).


On Sun, 15 Mar 2020 at 4:41 pm, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@...> wrote:

What is the range (and average) of soil pH in the target areas?

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:09 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Hi folks,

I’m Adam from Ghana. I feel honored to be accepted into this august community. My company has recently commenced the production of biochar, Wood Vinegar and Charcoal briquettes near Kumasi using sawdust and rice husk (unlimited supplies available) as feedstock. In the face of limited marketing opportunities at this early stage, one of our prime targets is the cocoa sector (cocoa is the main forex earner for Ghana).

 

According to the Ghana Cocoa Board, studies have shown that soil acidity is one of the major constraints on cocoa cultivation as it limits the levels of key nutrients such as Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus in the soil. This leads to low cocoa yields, thereby affecting farmers’ income. The problem is prevalent especially in the Western Regions of Ghana where 70% of the cocoa is produced. To resolve the problem of soil acidity, the Ghana Cocobod has lately introduce a chemical soil conditioner (Omya Calciprill) to farmers in the cocoa sector. Omya Calciprill is imported using scarce forex.

 

Currently we are planning to introduce biochar to the Ghana Cocobod as a better, low cost alternative to chemical soil conditioners to address the problem of soil acidity. To this end, I’d be grateful to receive any info, data, studies, reports, etc. establishing the positive effects of biochar on acidic soils, particular in connection with tropical crops such as cocoa.

 

Warmest regards.


mikethewormguy
 

We are currently using a soil amendment that contains cocoa bean shell, enriched biochar, and other additives.

Cocoa bean shell is a great fungi stimulant, as well as, a fertilizer.  It complements our recipe well.

Contact us directly via email if you want further details......



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


John Hofmeyr
 

Greetings. I am new to the group.

Recently, the question of soil pH came up on the Izindaba Zokudla (Conversations about Food – South Africa) WhatsApp group. I posted the following although it is unrelated to biochar:

Some commentary about soil pH:

My soil biology guru is Dr Elaine Ingham. Many of her lectures are on the internet but, today, I refer you-all to "The Root of Your Profits" at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2H60ritjag .

It is an hour and a half long! So I'll refer to specific segments which I find to be important. If you view nothing else, I urge you to view the segment starting at 48'30" which refers to soil pH and the consequent plant-availability of nutrients.

32'35": Commentary on nutrient retention

35'0": Reference to lime and how most of artificially-added lime is lost to leaching if the soil and its biology isn't good. (Good soil structure = no plough-pan = no pooling of water = no anaerobic conditions. (Anaerobic conditions favour pathogenic microorganisms. Aerobic conditions favour the "good-guys".)

45'0" to 47'45": Dr Ingham argues that soil (chemical) tests are meaningless. More particularly, if you DO SEE a plant response to the addition of synthetic fertilizers, the message is : 'Your soil biology is deficient.' Conversely, if you soil biology is OK, then the addition of synthetic fertilizers will not make any difference to your plants whatsoever. But a soil analysis may indicate deficiencies. Ingham argues that a plant tissue analysis is a much better indicator of what your plant is getting and what it may need.

48'30" to 51'.00": Dr Ingham says "Agronomists love this (chart)" because it justifies them trying to sell you something which you don't need. Dr Ingham debunks the myth that soil analyses can tell you anything important. Barring extreme conditions of average pH, your plants will modify the pH in the root-zone to whatever is optimal from time to time during the growing season. The key take-away from this segment is: Put your plants to work; let them do what they do! That is achieved by ensuring the correct soil biology.

I hope that is helpful.

Some of you may recall that I have lectured on biochar as a soil amendment primarily to improve soil biology along with other benefits. (Biochar / VERMICHAR / BOKACHAR). And I've spoken about interventions to support the move from subsistence farming to commercial. ("7 Fat Cows"). I am awaiting a response from PEETS about repeating and extending those lectures. John Hofmeyr

 

 

Regards,
John Hofmeyr
Ph +27-(0)11-788-7040
Mob: +27-(0)83-956-0407

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: 15 March 2020 19:25
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

The range of the soil pH is from 4.57–5.12 in the top 0-15 cm ( falls below 5.7–7.2 reported to be normal for cocoa).

 

 

On Sun, 15 Mar 2020 at 4:41 pm, Paul S Anderson

<psanders@...> wrote:

What is the range (and average) of soil pH in the target areas?

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:09 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Hi folks,

I’m Adam from Ghana. I feel honored to be accepted into this august community. My company has recently commenced the production of biochar, Wood Vinegar and Charcoal briquettes near Kumasi using sawdust and rice husk (unlimited supplies available) as feedstock. In the face of limited marketing opportunities at this early stage, one of our prime targets is the cocoa sector (cocoa is the main forex earner for Ghana).

 

According to the Ghana Cocoa Board, studies have shown that soil acidity is one of the major constraints on cocoa cultivation as it limits the levels of key nutrients such as Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus in the soil. This leads to low cocoa yields, thereby affecting farmers’ income. The problem is prevalent especially in the Western Regions of Ghana where 70% of the cocoa is produced. To resolve the problem of soil acidity, the Ghana Cocobod has lately introduce a chemical soil conditioner (Omya Calciprill) to farmers in the cocoa sector. Omya Calciprill is imported using scarce forex.

 

Currently we are planning to introduce biochar to the Ghana Cocobod as a better, low cost alternative to chemical soil conditioners to address the problem of soil acidity. To this end, I’d be grateful to receive any info, data, studies, reports, etc. establishing the positive effects of biochar on acidic soils, particular in connection with tropical crops such as cocoa.

 

Warmest regards.


Paul S Anderson
 

Great.   The pH of the biochar will be above 7, so there are pH benefits as well as other biochar benefits.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 12:25 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

The range of the soil pH is from 4.57–5.12 in the top 0-15 cm ( falls below 5.7–7.2 reported to be normal for cocoa).

 

 

On Sun, 15 Mar 2020 at 4:41 pm, Paul S Anderson

<psanders@...> wrote:

What is the range (and average) of soil pH in the target areas?

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

     Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

     Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP

     Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  to support woodgas (TLUD) projects

     incl. purchase of Woodgas Emission Reduction (WER) carbon credits

     and please tell you friends about these distinctive service efforts.

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

     with pages 88 – 94 about  solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of ALHAJI ADAM ZACHARIAH SULEMANA via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 8:09 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] BIOCHAR-BASED SOLUTION FOR SOIL ACIDITY FOR THE COCOA SECTOR IN GHANA

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Hi folks,

I’m Adam from Ghana. I feel honored to be accepted into this august community. My company has recently commenced the production of biochar, Wood Vinegar and Charcoal briquettes near Kumasi using sawdust and rice husk (unlimited supplies available) as feedstock. In the face of limited marketing opportunities at this early stage, one of our prime targets is the cocoa sector (cocoa is the main forex earner for Ghana).

 

According to the Ghana Cocoa Board, studies have shown that soil acidity is one of the major constraints on cocoa cultivation as it limits the levels of key nutrients such as Nitrogen, Potassium and Phosphorus in the soil. This leads to low cocoa yields, thereby affecting farmers’ income. The problem is prevalent especially in the Western Regions of Ghana where 70% of the cocoa is produced. To resolve the problem of soil acidity, the Ghana Cocobod has lately introduce a chemical soil conditioner (Omya Calciprill) to farmers in the cocoa sector. Omya Calciprill is imported using scarce forex.

 

Currently we are planning to introduce biochar to the Ghana Cocobod as a better, low cost alternative to chemical soil conditioners to address the problem of soil acidity. To this end, I’d be grateful to receive any info, data, studies, reports, etc. establishing the positive effects of biochar on acidic soils, particular in connection with tropical crops such as cocoa.

 

Warmest regards.