Topics

Biochar as phosphorus fertilizer #biochar #europe #microbes #nutrients #properties


CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Respected members,
As I currently working on the availability of phosphorus from biochar so, I am introducing a new topic about "Biochar as a phosphorus fertilizer". The main source of phosphorus is the rock phosphate which is depleting and the requirement increasing. On the other hand, biochar generally contains a large amount of phosphorus so, in this situation, it is necessary to find out a new strategy to increase the availability of the phosphorus from biochar for plant uptake. The soil microbial community also plays an important role to solubilize the phosphorus from biochar. Research in this field increasing during recent times. If anyone has suggestions/proposals or ideas on this topic please inform here in this group discussion.

Thank you very much to all of you and be careful during the viral outbreak.

Regards,
Paul


Frank Strie
 

Hello Paul and all,
Over the years lots of R&D work and experiences on this important topic was /is done, accumulated and shared  by people and  technology developers /providers such as PYREG and associated feedstock processors such as manure and sewage sludge providers …

Sewage sludge becomes a phosphorus fertilizer - pyreg

 

1.     In the PYREG process, the sewage sludge is completely recycled into a fertiliser substrate with plant-available phosphorus that is approved throughout Europe.


https://www.pyreg.de/sludge/?lang=en

Stricter limits, obligation to recycle phosphorus, rising waste disposal costs due to capacity bottlenecks: The recycling of sewage sludge is becoming increasingly sophisticated. We support you with our leading-edge carbonisation technology: With a PYREG system, the dried sewage sludge is carbonised, hygienised and completely recycled into a phosphorus fertiliser substrate approved throughout Europe. The technology has already proven at 3 wastewater treatment plants in Germany and the USA, and pays off from a size of 50,000 p.e. (population equivalent) ”…

You may like to study the information and references etc via this link.
It is great to deal with credible people who are outcome orientated rather than short term “egoistic winners”.
Best wishes
Frank
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 12:36 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Biochar as phosphorus fertilizer #europe #microbes #properties #nutrients #biochar

 

Respected members,
As I currently working on the availability of phosphorus from biochar so, I am introducing a new topic about "Biochar as a phosphorus fertilizer". The main source of phosphorus is the rock phosphate which is depleting and the requirement increasing. On the other hand, biochar generally contains a large amount of phosphorus so, in this situation, it is necessary to find out a new strategy to increase the availability of the phosphorus from biochar for plant uptake. The soil microbial community also plays an important role to solubilize the phosphorus from biochar. Research in this field increasing during recent times. If anyone has suggestions/proposals or ideas on this topic please inform here in this group discussion.

Thank you very much to all of you and be careful during the viral outbreak.

Regards,
Paul


Rick Wilson <rwilson@...>
 

I am surprised that you believe phosphorus levels in biochar are high.
I've tested every commercially available biochar that I could bring into California. Phosphorous concentrations are very low in all cases.  A few hundred ppm's on average.
Potassium, in some cases is at the thousands of ppm level.

I'm interested in how biochar impacts phosphorus in the soil.  Please see the attached graphic describing phosphorous states in soil. 

Rick


Barry Husk
 

Rick,

 

One of our recent studies on biochar and phosphorus retention in soil:

 

Biochar-induced soil stability influences phosphorus retention in a temperate agricultural soil

http://joann-whalen.research.mcgill.ca/publications/Geoderma%20351--71-75.pdf

 

Barry Husk

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson
Sent: March 20, 2020 10:08 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar as phosphorus fertilizer #europe #microbes #properties #nutrients #biochar

 

I am surprised that you believe phosphorus levels in biochar are high.
I've tested every commercially available biochar that I could bring into California. Phosphorous concentrations are very low in all cases.  A few hundred ppm's on average.
Potassium, in some cases is at the thousands of ppm level.

I'm interested in how biochar impacts phosphorus in the soil.  Please see the attached graphic describing phosphorous states in soil. 

Rick


Thomas Casten
 

Barry: Could you clarify the dates of biochar addition and the testing.  The description implies that the biochar was added in 2010, but could be read to say that the research plots were established ten years ago.  I could not determine when the tests took place, just the 2020 pub date.

It seems that biochar provides a safe haven for mycorrhizal fungi, but require a symbiotic relationship with the plant to receive hexose, but the plants do not send out signals or easily admit the penetration of the mycorrhizal hyphae unless the plant is short on phosphorous or nitrogen.  In that case, the plant provides up to 20% of its carbon from photosynthesis to the fungi,  which returns nutrients including phosphorous in a form the plant can use.

My read of soil runoff reduction seems to credit the glomalin exudate from the biochar-enhanced mycorrhizal fungi with gluing soil into larger particles.  Furthermore, tillage exposes this carbon to degradation.  Hence the question of how long after biochar addition were the tests run, and if more than one season, were the plots tilled? 

Thomas R Casten
Cell: 630-915-9215
Work: 630-321-1095



On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 7:48 AM Barry Husk <husk@...> wrote:

Rick,

 

One of our recent studies on biochar and phosphorus retention in soil:

 

Biochar-induced soil stability influences phosphorus retention in a temperate agricultural soil

http://joann-whalen.research.mcgill.ca/publications/Geoderma%20351--71-75.pdf

 

Barry Husk

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson
Sent: March 20, 2020 10:08 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar as phosphorus fertilizer #europe #microbes #properties #nutrients #biochar

 

I am surprised that you believe phosphorus levels in biochar are high.
I've tested every commercially available biochar that I could bring into California. Phosphorous concentrations are very low in all cases.  A few hundred ppm's on average.
Potassium, in some cases is at the thousands of ppm level.

I'm interested in how biochar impacts phosphorus in the soil.  Please see the attached graphic describing phosphorous states in soil. 

Rick


--
Thomas R Casten
tr9casten@...
630-915-9215


Rick Wilson
 

Thanks Barry, good article!  Rick

On Saturday, March 21, 2020, 05:34:09 PM PDT, Thomas Casten <tr9casten@...> wrote:


Barry: Could you clarify the dates of biochar addition and the testing.  The description implies that the biochar was added in 2010, but could be read to say that the research plots were established ten years ago.  I could not determine when the tests took place, just the 2020 pub date.

It seems that biochar provides a safe haven for mycorrhizal fungi, but require a symbiotic relationship with the plant to receive hexose, but the plants do not send out signals or easily admit the penetration of the mycorrhizal hyphae unless the plant is short on phosphorous or nitrogen.  In that case, the plant provides up to 20% of its carbon from photosynthesis to the fungi,  which returns nutrients including phosphorous in a form the plant can use.

My read of soil runoff reduction seems to credit the glomalin exudate from the biochar-enhanced mycorrhizal fungi with gluing soil into larger particles.  Furthermore, tillage exposes this carbon to degradation.  Hence the question of how long after biochar addition were the tests run, and if more than one season, were the plots tilled? 

Thomas R Casten
Cell: 630-915-9215
Work: 630-321-1095



On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 7:48 AM Barry Husk <husk@...> wrote:

Rick,

 

One of our recent studies on biochar and phosphorus retention in soil:

 

Biochar-induced soil stability influences phosphorus retention in a temperate agricultural soil

http://joann-whalen.research.mcgill.ca/publications/Geoderma%20351--71-75.pdf

 

Barry Husk

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson
Sent: March 20, 2020 10:08 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar as phosphorus fertilizer #europe #microbes #properties #nutrients #biochar

 

I am surprised that you believe phosphorus levels in biochar are high.
I've tested every commercially available biochar that I could bring into California. Phosphorous concentrations are very low in all cases.  A few hundred ppm's on average.
Potassium, in some cases is at the thousands of ppm level.

I'm interested in how biochar impacts phosphorus in the soil.  Please see the attached graphic describing phosphorous states in soil. 

Rick


--
Thomas R Casten
tr9casten@...
630-915-9215