[New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers! #organic


Ron Larson
 

List,  cc 2 in California

At first this announcement didn’t seem to include biochar.



We find that compost information says on page 5 of this publication:  https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/oefi/healthysoils/docs/CompostApplicationRate_WhitePaper.pdf



Begin forwarded message:

From: CalCAN <donotreply@...>
Subject: [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!
Date: March 26, 2020 at 12:20:08 PM MDT




Ron Larson
 

List, cc Josiah and Rick;

Apologies.  I didn’t mean to have this sent.  

Below,  I’ve inserted my intended two questions - in hope that we can get other states to follow suit.

Ron



On Mar 26, 2020, at 5:49 PM, Ronal Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

List,  cc 2 in California

At first this announcement didn’t seem to include biochar.



We find that compost information says on page 5 of this publication:  https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/oefi/healthysoils/docs/CompostApplicationRate_WhitePaper.pdf

"Composts to which biochar was added during the composting process as a process amendment are also eligible for the program as long as they meet all of the requirements above. Biochar materials alone or biochar materials that have been added to compost in contexts other than as an amendment to facilitate the composting process are not eligible for this incentives program. The reason for excluding biochar in the CDFA Incentive Program at this time is because regulatory standards are in the process of being developed and there are few experimental field trials that examine the application rate of biochar along with evaluating its benefits and limitations. "

So, because California is so important for biochar activity,  can anyone give a little more on 
a.   the likelihood of California biochar applicants for these funds being successful, and
b.  what is happening to remove this exclusion.

Ron




Begin forwarded message:

From: CalCAN <donotreply@...>
Subject: [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!
Date: March 26, 2020 at 12:20:08 PM MDT





Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...>
 

Ron, 

I did attend this webinar below on Tuesday and ask why biochar was not mentioned. The speaker was very good but his answer on biochar had to do with the difficulty to measure benefits for soils’ health, something of the sort. I join a print screen of croplands eligible practices. Despite IPCC recognition, biochar is still not recognized as it should, at least for now.

"The Climate Group cordially invites you to join our upcoming webinar delivered in partnership with the Government of California.​

Tune in to learn about state and regional strategies to improve soil health and carbon sequestration in farmlands and ranchlands, based on the experience of California’s Healthy Soils Program.​

As soil health deteriorates globally, programs promoting healthy soils become imperative. Practices that support healthy soils offer many co-benefits, including agricultural sustainability, climate change adaptation, emissions reductions and increased yields and farm income.
 
In this webinar, California presents its innovative approach to improving soil health, the Healthy Soils Program, and breaks down the program’s key components and mechanisms. ​

Speakers: Amrith Gunasekara, Science Advisor to the Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture​" 


Le 26 mars 2020 à 19:49, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> a écrit :


List,  cc 2 in California

At first this announcement didn’t seem to include biochar.




We find that compost information says on page 5 of this publication:  https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/oefi/healthysoils/docs/CompostApplicationRate_WhitePaper.pdf



Begin forwarded message:

From: CalCAN <donotreply@...>
Subject: [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!
Date: March 26, 2020 at 12:20:08 PM MDT





Ron Larson
 

Benoit and ccs:

Thanks for the added information on the California webinar and biochar.  Sounds like I didn’t miss much.  (Kelpie Wilson gave a great biochar webinar that day.)

Your screen shot is in one of the cites below - plus many similar.  There are an amazing number of practices that do count fully even while biochar is only MAYBE OK..

Perhaps soon we will have enough data from the thousands of biochar tests going on, that we can answer how to “measure benefits for soil health”.   For sure there will have to be consideration of more than the first year changes.

Ron



On Mar 26, 2020, at 6:16 PM, Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...> wrote:

Ron, 

I did attend this webinar below on Tuesday and ask why biochar was not mentioned. The speaker was very good but his answer on biochar had to do with the difficulty to measure benefits for soils’ health, something of the sort. I join a print screen of croplands eligible practices. Despite IPCC recognition, biochar is still not recognized as it should, at least for now.

"The Climate Group cordially invites you to join our upcoming webinar delivered in partnership with the Government of California.​

Tune in to learn about state and regional strategies to improve soil health and carbon sequestration in farmlands and ranchlands, based on the experience of California’s Healthy Soils Program.​

As soil health deteriorates globally, programs promoting healthy soils become imperative. Practices that support healthy soils offer many co-benefits, including agricultural sustainability, climate change adaptation, emissions reductions and increased yields and farm income.
 
In this webinar, California presents its innovative approach to improving soil health, the Healthy Soils Program, and breaks down the program’s key components and mechanisms. ​

Speakers: Amrith Gunasekara, Science Advisor to the Secretary, California Department of Food and Agriculture​" 

<Capture d’écran 2020-03-24 à 11.29.44.png>

Le 26 mars 2020 à 19:49, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> a écrit :


List,  cc 2 in California

At first this announcement didn’t seem to include biochar.




We find that compost information says on page 5 of this publication:  https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/oefi/healthysoils/docs/CompostApplicationRate_WhitePaper.pdf



Begin forwarded message:

From: CalCAN <donotreply@...>
Subject: [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!
Date: March 26, 2020 at 12:20:08 PM MDT






Rick Wilson
 

Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick


Rick Wilson
 

Ron, apologies I made a mistake in my calculations. $50 per ton of biochar on a cubic yard basis is a small number.
$50/7.4 cubic yard = $6.75 per cubic yard.


Teel, Wayne
 

Rick and all,

 

I like your images.  As a professor/teacher I love to use things like this in classes, so consider this my asking permission to do so.  I won’t use them this year.  Classes are only on line now and we are not even allowed to meet with students because of Covid-19.  Even though $50 is not that much, when you add in the tipping fees saved from both the woody biomass and kitchen/grocery waste (just coffee grounds alone in a city) the dollars add up even before you sell the product.  I have a student working at a local farm associated with a retirement community, and that community sends all their organic waste to the farm.  We are charring the woody biomass using a flame-cap device like the ones Kelpie Wilson describes and then they compost it.  This season it will be the source of nutrient for the farm, whose produce all goes back to the kitchens of the retirement community.  Same kind of cycle you are describing, just that the scale is much smaller and the product is not for sale at the end.  Unfortunately the student is not able to complete the study because of the virus.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:50 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!

 

Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick


Charles Hegberg
 

Very nice graphics. 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of "Rick Wilson via Groups.Io" <rick012@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, March 26, 2020 at 10:50 PM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!

 

Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick


Valentine Nzengung
 

Your graphics are very good for lectures.
Thank you for the informative work.

Valentine


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io <rick012@...>
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:50 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!
 
[EXTERNAL SENDER - PROCEED CAUTIOUSLY]

Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick


Rick Wilson
 

Wayne of course you can use these files.  I don’t need any credit. 

I agree that tipping fees can pay for producing biochar. This is my game plan. 
But any scale is a good scale, small, local, over time, perhaps is better. 

Could be this virus changes the way we think about our role in the environment, and how we impact it.  
You would not believe how clear the air is, and how blue the ocean is right now in Southern California. Astonishing. 
Nature is telling is something. 

Rick


On Mar 27, 2020, at 3:00 AM, Teel, Wayne <teelws@...> wrote:

Rick and all,
 
I like your images.  As a professor/teacher I love to use things like this in classes, so consider this my asking permission to do so.  I won’t use them this year.  Classes are only on line now and we are not even allowed to meet with students because of Covid-19.  Even though $50 is not that much, when you add in the tipping fees saved from both the woody biomass and kitchen/grocery waste (just coffee grounds alone in a city) the dollars add up even before you sell the product.  I have a student working at a local farm associated with a retirement community, and that community sends all their organic waste to the farm.  We are charring the woody biomass using a flame-cap device like the ones Kelpie Wilson describes and then they compost it.  This season it will be the source of nutrient for the farm, whose produce all goes back to the kitchens of the retirement community.  Same kind of cycle you are describing, just that the scale is much smaller and the product is not for sale at the end.  Unfortunately the student is not able to complete the study because of the virus.
 
Wayne
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:50 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!
 
Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick 



Teel, Wayne
 

Rick,

 

Yes, nature is telling us something.  It’s been telling us a long time, but the economy has dominated the conversation so much it is hard to hear the message.  Now we can see the message clearly (pun intended) but can we keep it that way?  And when the EPA decides to relax pollution regulations to help companies survive the economic issues of the virus, will the air come back even worse?

 

I don’t know if you saw Kelpie Wilson’s webinar on Tuesday.  It was well worth the time and what she is talking about is highly scalable.  I have looked at our waste disposal site and they are getting lots of organic material from around the city and county all the time and it is just rotting into the air without doing much good for anyone.  I don’t have a number on tons or kg per day, but it is likely enough to support a biochar operation, and a lot of food waste comes there too.  I think it is time to do an investigation about implementing your type of system locally, whether a large batch operation or a continuous feed system.  I will use your graphics and see if I get any nibbles from the local waste management people.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2020 12:22 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!

 

Wayne of course you can use these files.  I don’t need any credit. 

 

I agree that tipping fees can pay for producing biochar. This is my game plan. 

But any scale is a good scale, small, local, over time, perhaps is better. 

 

Could be this virus changes the way we think about our role in the environment, and how we impact it.  

You would not believe how clear the air is, and how blue the ocean is right now in Southern California. Astonishing. 

Nature is telling is something. 

 

Rick

 



On Mar 27, 2020, at 3:00 AM, Teel, Wayne <teelws@...> wrote:

 

Rick and all,

 

I like your images.  As a professor/teacher I love to use things like this in classes, so consider this my asking permission to do so.  I won’t use them this year.  Classes are only on line now and we are not even allowed to meet with students because of Covid-19.  Even though $50 is not that much, when you add in the tipping fees saved from both the woody biomass and kitchen/grocery waste (just coffee grounds alone in a city) the dollars add up even before you sell the product.  I have a student working at a local farm associated with a retirement community, and that community sends all their organic waste to the farm.  We are charring the woody biomass using a flame-cap device like the ones Kelpie Wilson describes and then they compost it.  This season it will be the source of nutrient for the farm, whose produce all goes back to the kitchens of the retirement community.  Same kind of cycle you are describing, just that the scale is much smaller and the product is not for sale at the end.  Unfortunately the student is not able to complete the study because of the virus.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:50 PM
To: 
main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!

 

Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick 

 


Kwame Frimpong
 

Wayne
Clearly your post  could not have come at a better time and particularly, for those of us living and working in Africa. For most parts of sub Saharan Africa the soils are highly weathered and mostly deficient in soil nutrients. Consequently, our already low yields are fast declining. In the face of burgeoning African population and the urgent need to adopt sustainable agricultural intensification, soil fertility management and soil conservation as well as climate change adaptation and mitigation are of very critical concern. In our countries, also, waste disposal is a huge challenge but given that our countries are less industrialized our domestic wastes, which contain in excess of 60% of organic components,  are important sources of plant nutrients if they are recycled.  However, these are often indiscriminately  disposed of resulting in soil, air and water pollution. Now that Covid-19 has shown that there is only ONE world, it is about time that we saw our biochar and compost research from a global perspective. The Africa Soil Initiative being championed by Tom Miles and colleagues from IBI is struggling to secure research funding support to initiate biochar-focused research activities in Africa. I hope we can now see the urgent need to support this worthy cause.
Kwame
Prof. Kwame Agyei Frimpong
(Associate professor in Soil Science & Soil Fertility)
Department of Soil Science, 
School of Agriculture,
School of Agriculture and Natural Sciences
University of Cape Coast
Ghana
+233268690780



On Sat, Mar 28, 2020 at 9:51 AM Teel, Wayne <teelws@...> wrote:

Rick,

 

Yes, nature is telling us something.  It’s been telling us a long time, but the economy has dominated the conversation so much it is hard to hear the message.  Now we can see the message clearly (pun intended) but can we keep it that way?  And when the EPA decides to relax pollution regulations to help companies survive the economic issues of the virus, will the air come back even worse?

 

I don’t know if you saw Kelpie Wilson’s webinar on Tuesday.  It was well worth the time and what she is talking about is highly scalable.  I have looked at our waste disposal site and they are getting lots of organic material from around the city and county all the time and it is just rotting into the air without doing much good for anyone.  I don’t have a number on tons or kg per day, but it is likely enough to support a biochar operation, and a lot of food waste comes there too.  I think it is time to do an investigation about implementing your type of system locally, whether a large batch operation or a continuous feed system.  I will use your graphics and see if I get any nibbles from the local waste management people.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, March 28, 2020 12:22 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!

 

Wayne of course you can use these files.  I don’t need any credit. 

 

I agree that tipping fees can pay for producing biochar. This is my game plan. 

But any scale is a good scale, small, local, over time, perhaps is better. 

 

Could be this virus changes the way we think about our role in the environment, and how we impact it.  

You would not believe how clear the air is, and how blue the ocean is right now in Southern California. Astonishing. 

Nature is telling is something. 

 

Rick

 



On Mar 27, 2020, at 3:00 AM, Teel, Wayne <teelws@...> wrote:

 

Rick and all,

 

I like your images.  As a professor/teacher I love to use things like this in classes, so consider this my asking permission to do so.  I won’t use them this year.  Classes are only on line now and we are not even allowed to meet with students because of Covid-19.  Even though $50 is not that much, when you add in the tipping fees saved from both the woody biomass and kitchen/grocery waste (just coffee grounds alone in a city) the dollars add up even before you sell the product.  I have a student working at a local farm associated with a retirement community, and that community sends all their organic waste to the farm.  We are charring the woody biomass using a flame-cap device like the ones Kelpie Wilson describes and then they compost it.  This season it will be the source of nutrient for the farm, whose produce all goes back to the kitchens of the retirement community.  Same kind of cycle you are describing, just that the scale is much smaller and the product is not for sale at the end.  Unfortunately the student is not able to complete the study because of the virus.

 

Wayne

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 10:50 PM
To: 
main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] [New post] The Healthy Soils Program benefits organic producers!

 

Hi Ron,
California moves at its own pace.  But once it's in, it goes all in. 

Currently you can get paid $50 per DRY ton for co-composted biochar with the CDFA grants. 
A gasifier char, which is dry, will have a density of #10 per cubic foot, which is 270# per cubic yard. 
So one ton (2000#) of biochar is 7.4 cubic yards. 7.4 cubic yards/ton x $50 = $370 per cubic yard, that's a lot of money for biochar!

My understanding is that the CDFA is coming the the conclusion that biochar stabilizes organic matter.
I am told there is a Lawrence Livermore study but I have not seen it.   And there are others of course. 

I can tell you that biochar is making it into the research programs of the largest compost operators in the state. 
(And they are calling me to help them)

Please see the attached drawings, which is how I am telling them the story of biochar and compost, and where the waste companies fit in. 
These are copyright protected, but I am happy to grant access as long as I know where they are being used (not to compete against me, but with me).

Rick