assistance with field experiments #fieldtrials


Marcelo Alves
 


Dear colleagues
I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.
I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.
How could I solve this?
I count on your help, thank you.

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves


Charles Hegberg
 

Where are you located?  Short of a commercial gasifier with capabilities to handle manures, not sure about small scale production.  You might be better to produce wood char and compost the poultry litter with the biochar which also makes a great product.  Most manure char production is used as a waste reduction strategy. 

Chuck Hegberg

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Marcelo Alves <marceloalves@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 11:34 AM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] assistance with field experiments

 

 

Dear colleagues

I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.

I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.

How could I solve this?

I count on your help, thank you.

 

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves

 


Claudia Kammann
 

I second Chuck’s advice for composting the manure with woody biochar

 

Motto: „compost the (nutrient-rich) best and pyrolyze the (woody) rest”

 

For producing a good quality biochar you can do it via the Kon-Tiki kiln technique (as long as you don’t have a larger machine). There are a lot of online tutorials and it’s easy to learn. If you can’t built a cheap Kon-Tiki, you can also use a large, cone shaped pit in the ground as long as you use the principle of flame curtain pyrolysis. I’ll send two papers that may help and make the method citable for you.

 

cheers, Claudia

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Charles Hegberg
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 8. April 2020 18:08
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] assistance with field experiments

 

Where are you located?  Short of a commercial gasifier with capabilities to handle manures, not sure about small scale production.  You might be better to produce wood char and compost the poultry litter with the biochar which also makes a great product.  Most manure char production is used as a waste reduction strategy. 

Chuck Hegberg

 

 

From: <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Marcelo Alves <marceloalves@...>
Reply-To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 at 11:34 AM
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: [Biochar] assistance with field experiments

 

 

Dear colleagues

I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.

I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.

How could I solve this?

I count on your help, thank you.

 

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves

 


Thomas Casten
 

Focus on your sugar mills efficiency.  I spent 40 years building combined heat and power plants, always seeking to profitably improve the efficiency of converting the energy in input fuel to useful thermal and electrical energy.  The cane sugar mills all burn bagasse to produce required thermal and electric energy for the mill, but have not had any reason to invest in more efficient conversion.  These mills have to get rid of the bagasse, so never improved their cycle post initial construction.  One plant I visited in Indonesia continued to use a 1908 steam-piston engine to turn an 8-meter diameter flywheel connected to the electric generator.

There are good investment opportunities to replace these ancient plants with modern plants that Tom Miles could design to process all of the bagasse, use higher steam pressures and backpressure turbines to produce the plant's requirements for thermal and electric energy, and convert the rest of the bagasse to biochar.  I do not have exact figures, but think that a modernized plant, which had also reduced the wasted thermal energy, could derive most of its energy from the pyrolyzed gases and convert a high percentage of the biomass carbon to fixed carbon in biochar.
The best part of this story is the incredible gain in sugar production over 5 years achieved by Isabel Lima with the USDA in a Louisiana test.  The sugar production in the 4th production year was 42% above the first-year production of the control field without biochar.  The farmers could probably have delayed the fallow year by 2 to 4 years, but the research plot was already scheduled for another trial.
Thomas R Casten
Cell: 630-915-9215
Work: 630-321-1095



On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 10:35 AM Marcelo Alves <marceloalves@...> wrote:

Dear colleagues
I would like to share with colleagues certain difficulties that we have faced.
I am from a region that has sandy and poor soils and at the same time generates a lot of waste (chicken manure, bio manure, cane bagasse, cotton cake, etc.) and I am convinced that biochar can bring many benefits to these soils. However, whenever I think about research and field experiments, the problem arises of how to produce enough biochar? We even managed to produce something in the laboratory using muffle furnaces, but on a field scale it is difficult.
How could I solve this?
I count on your help, thank you.

Prof. Dr. Marcelo R. Alves


--
Thomas R Casten
tr9casten@...
630-915-9215


cavm@...
 

Tom, we designed a stratified downdraft gasification system for Indonesia to supplement and replace between 50% and 90% of the diesel fuel going into the diesel generators now in use on the islands. While our systems were designed to use empty palm fruit bunches as fuel they can use bagasse just as well or better. 

The units paid for themselves in about 6 months on the fuel savings.

They can be programmed to produce biochar as a residual.

Neal Van Milligen
cavm@...


Stephen Joseph
 

Dear Neil

Do you have detailed information about the design that you can share please.  Also how long have they been running for and what issues did you find with the palm bunches.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 1:23 PM cavm via groups.io <cavm=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Tom, we designed a stratified downdraft gasification system for Indonesia to supplement and replace between 50% and 90% of the diesel fuel going into the diesel generators now in use on the islands. While our systems were designed to use empty palm fruit bunches as fuel they can use bagasse just as well or better. 

The units paid for themselves in about 6 months on the fuel savings.

They can be programmed to produce biochar as a residual.

Neal Van Milligen