Topics

FAQs, or Frequently Searched regarding Biochar #faq


Daniel Pidgeon
 

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon


Thomas Casten
 

Daniel Pidgeon: please call me at 630-321-1095 or cell 630-915-9215 to discuss the possibility of working on biochar for pay.
Thomas R Casten
Cell: 630-915-9215
Work: 630-321-1095



On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 7:59 AM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon


--
Thomas R Casten
tr9casten@...
630-915-9215


Daniel Pidgeon
 

Thomas,
I tried to call, left a message. I’m in Sydney, Australia. I don’t know how that works with what you are thinking... I’d be delighted to talk, or converse here, or direct email. Thank you.
Daniel


On 13 Apr 2020, at 3:07 am, Thomas Casten <tr9casten@...> wrote:

Daniel Pidgeon: please call me at 630-321-1095 or cell 630-915-9215 to discuss the possibility of working on biochar for pay.
Thomas R Casten
Cell: 630-915-9215
Work: 630-321-1095



On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 7:59 AM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon


--
Thomas R Casten
tr9casten@...
630-915-9215


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Daniel,

Please tell us more about your work in Africa. Where? When? What?

The need for anything, anything, to restore soils, mitigate the consequences of climate change and improve food security is desperate. Covid hasn't really hit yet, although it will catastrophically in a few weeks. But long after Covid is gone, Africa will be starving unless Covid reduces the population as much as the Black Death did that of medieval Europe.



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 7:59 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon


Daniel Pidgeon
 

Hi Michael,

I am glad to hear from you.

I am simply a man learning to fish, to teach others to fish on the other side of the world, who will then teach others. My 'work' over there is woefully small at the moment, but I hope for it to grow.

Ten years ago I volunteered in regional Zambia, at an orphan unit like non I had heard of. Instead of institutionalising orphans, they housed them with extended family, and provided assistance and training to the family and the orphan. I like the model. Maintain the family unit. Train up the children in necessary life skills. And the child has someone more likely to love and nurture them. At least that's the plan. It is often worked around subsistence farming, as that is the local way of life.

I sponsored and supported for many years, in particular one who I worked alongside, and supported when he left the organisation and started an orphan unit on his own.

Wanting to help more, but being unable to volunteer anymore thanks to my own family unit growing from just me, to a family of six within a couple of years, I started studying how to farm better, how to improve soils, how to improve crop yield and have less dependance on the expensive, chemical fertilisers and pesticides that they depend on, and transport from far, at great impact of profits and impact on soil health.

Biochar came to my knowledge for the first time about two years ago.

I've emailed my friend many times teaching and instructing with links to various things. The importance of minimal till, and ground cover. Manures, composts, mulches and worms. Chicken tractors, and other regenerative farming and permaculture concepts.

I have emailed him regarding biochar and it's benefits. I have looked into char producing stoves. I didn't have much success sourcing one over there to get to him. I built one here(to use and know before I recommend), and was a little disappointed with the outcome. I think the slightly larger ones like the Seachar Estufa Finca might be a little better at handling varied feedstock(though I have not tried that one yet, mine was smaller), but he has neither the tools or the knowhow to make one. 

I had been driven by the desire to make use of the heat, as well as produce char. But have come to realise that might be letting the perfect get in the way of the good. So I am coming back around to looking at flame cap methods like the Moxham kiln, Kelpie's Ring of Fire, and your trench kiln, a simple way of dealing with waste(which likely would have been burnt anyway) and producing beneficial char.

My next email will be coming back to that, and likely touch on the urine charging that is going on in Malawi and in current conversations here.

Growth. If I can get some basic, simple, cheap but reliable and repeatable methods in place with him, I will then approach Teen Missions and AIDS Orphans and Street Kids, the group I volunteered with in the first place, and work towards these principles becoming standard training procedures with their workers, and in their various orphan units.

My thoughts in possibly starting to produce and sell biochar here in Australia were obviously with the plan to support my family, but also to gain experience in the field, with the hope of being able to pour more funds into this field, and also maybe be able to create some hands on training videos for teaching over there, and any other place that might have some access to the internet. Aiming not strictly at biochar, but also some practices from Permaculture, Regenerative Farming, and even some Korean Natural Farming.

Thank you for your time. I would be delighted to hear any input, for either the home front or the battleground.

Kind regards,

Daniel Pidgeon


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...>
Sent: Sunday, 19 April 2020 5:00 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FAQs, or Frequently Searched regarding Biochar
 
Daniel,

Please tell us more about your work in Africa. Where? When? What?

The need for anything, anything, to restore soils, mitigate the consequences of climate change and improve food security is desperate. Covid hasn't really hit yet, although it will catastrophically in a few weeks. But long after Covid is gone, Africa will be starving unless Covid reduces the population as much as the Black Death did that of medieval Europe.



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

Latest Tweet: Recent article published by Global Ground Media #airpollution #globalwarmingsolutions https://t.co/a2cdLpWF7h https://t.co/rwDykD7b9K Read More
    

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 7:59 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon


Tom Stephan <tom@...>
 

Daniel,
 Thank for your work. You mentioned you are looking for better ways for subsistence farming. I like the idea of the sense of purpose, the learning of a trade and the nurturing of disadvantaged young persons. It is just this scenario I have in mind for a innovative regenerative agriculture idea I am working on called the "Food Forever Project".
 Meant as a humanitarian offering,  I took the basic "Main Street Project" model born of U. of MN. Prof. Reginaldo Haslett Maroquim and enhanced it comprehensively.  The idea involves bio char, mulch to grow earthworm beds in order to prepare the proper soil CEC and tilth first before the planting of vegetable crops and fruit and nut trees.
Once established, crops are planted in four paddocks with the coops in the center. Four doors on the coop with one door per paddock.
 Later the poultry are introduced, one paddock at a time. The birds control insects while lightly browsing the crops and feeding on the earthworms. The eggs produced are delicious.
 Then the birds are rotated from paddock to paddock allowing the crops to recover. The turkey, chicken and quail's manure keeps the soil fully charged for as long as the farm persists in a closed system. 
Irrigation is derived from the atmosphere using machines powered by solar units. Passive water generators and solar stills augment the atmospheric derived irrigation water and any rainfall is collected in catch pans with underground holding tanks which wildlife biologists build called "water guzzlers."
 This farm will produce an intense yield of organic food, vegetables, fruit, nuts, meat and eggs from a small acreage footprint, perfect for the family unit or communities that are without access to a water delivery system.
From small begginings come great things. If you know of an organization or individuals that may which to entertain the idea of underwriting the Food Forever Project, please contact me.


On Sun, Apr 19, 2020, 9:42 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Michael,

I am glad to hear from you.

I am simply a man learning to fish, to teach others to fish on the other side of the world, who will then teach others. My 'work' over there is woefully small at the moment, but I hope for it to grow.

Ten years ago I volunteered in regional Zambia, at an orphan unit like non I had heard of. Instead of institutionalising orphans, they housed them with extended family, and provided assistance and training to the family and the orphan. I like the model. Maintain the family unit. Train up the children in necessary life skills. And the child has someone more likely to love and nurture them. At least that's the plan. It is often worked around subsistence farming, as that is the local way of life.

I sponsored and supported for many years, in particular one who I worked alongside, and supported when he left the organisation and started an orphan unit on his own.

Wanting to help more, but being unable to volunteer anymore thanks to my own family unit growing from just me, to a family of six within a couple of years, I started studying how to farm better, how to improve soils, how to improve crop yield and have less dependance on the expensive, chemical fertilisers and pesticides that they depend on, and transport from far, at great impact of profits and impact on soil health.

Biochar came to my knowledge for the first time about two years ago.

I've emailed my friend many times teaching and instructing with links to various things. The importance of minimal till, and ground cover. Manures, composts, mulches and worms. Chicken tractors, and other regenerative farming and permaculture concepts.

I have emailed him regarding biochar and it's benefits. I have looked into char producing stoves. I didn't have much success sourcing one over there to get to him. I built one here(to use and know before I recommend), and was a little disappointed with the outcome. I think the slightly larger ones like the Seachar Estufa Finca might be a little better at handling varied feedstock(though I have not tried that one yet, mine was smaller), but he has neither the tools or the knowhow to make one. 

I had been driven by the desire to make use of the heat, as well as produce char. But have come to realise that might be letting the perfect get in the way of the good. So I am coming back around to looking at flame cap methods like the Moxham kiln, Kelpie's Ring of Fire, and your trench kiln, a simple way of dealing with waste(which likely would have been burnt anyway) and producing beneficial char.

My next email will be coming back to that, and likely touch on the urine charging that is going on in Malawi and in current conversations here.

Growth. If I can get some basic, simple, cheap but reliable and repeatable methods in place with him, I will then approach Teen Missions and AIDS Orphans and Street Kids, the group I volunteered with in the first place, and work towards these principles becoming standard training procedures with their workers, and in their various orphan units.

My thoughts in possibly starting to produce and sell biochar here in Australia were obviously with the plan to support my family, but also to gain experience in the field, with the hope of being able to pour more funds into this field, and also maybe be able to create some hands on training videos for teaching over there, and any other place that might have some access to the internet. Aiming not strictly at biochar, but also some practices from Permaculture, Regenerative Farming, and even some Korean Natural Farming.

Thank you for your time. I would be delighted to hear any input, for either the home front or the battleground.

Kind regards,

Daniel Pidgeon


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...>
Sent: Sunday, 19 April 2020 5:00 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FAQs, or Frequently Searched regarding Biochar
 
Daniel,

Please tell us more about your work in Africa. Where? When? What?

The need for anything, anything, to restore soils, mitigate the consequences of climate change and improve food security is desperate. Covid hasn't really hit yet, although it will catastrophically in a few weeks. But long after Covid is gone, Africa will be starving unless Covid reduces the population as much as the Black Death did that of medieval Europe.



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

Latest Tweet: Recent article published by Global Ground Media #airpollution #globalwarmingsolutions https://t.co/a2cdLpWF7h https://t.co/rwDykD7b9K Read More
    

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 7:59 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon


Daniel Pidgeon
 

Hi Tom,

I emailed you off discussion group as this conversation tends to wander from pure biochar.

Daniel


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Tom Stephan <tom@...>
Sent: Monday, 20 April 2020 4:23 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FAQs, or Frequently Searched regarding Biochar
 
Daniel,
 Thank for your work. You mentioned you are looking for better ways for subsistence farming. I like the idea of the sense of purpose, the learning of a trade and the nurturing of disadvantaged young persons. It is just this scenario I have in mind for a innovative regenerative agriculture idea I am working on called the "Food Forever Project".
 Meant as a humanitarian offering,  I took the basic "Main Street Project" model born of U. of MN. Prof. Reginaldo Haslett Maroquim and enhanced it comprehensively.  The idea involves bio char, mulch to grow earthworm beds in order to prepare the proper soil CEC and tilth first before the planting of vegetable crops and fruit and nut trees.
Once established, crops are planted in four paddocks with the coops in the center. Four doors on the coop with one door per paddock.
 Later the poultry are introduced, one paddock at a time. The birds control insects while lightly browsing the crops and feeding on the earthworms. The eggs produced are delicious.
 Then the birds are rotated from paddock to paddock allowing the crops to recover. The turkey, chicken and quail's manure keeps the soil fully charged for as long as the farm persists in a closed system. 
Irrigation is derived from the atmosphere using machines powered by solar units. Passive water generators and solar stills augment the atmospheric derived irrigation water and any rainfall is collected in catch pans with underground holding tanks which wildlife biologists build called "water guzzlers."
 This farm will produce an intense yield of organic food, vegetables, fruit, nuts, meat and eggs from a small acreage footprint, perfect for the family unit or communities that are without access to a water delivery system.
From small begginings come great things. If you know of an organization or individuals that may which to entertain the idea of underwriting the Food Forever Project, please contact me.


On Sun, Apr 19, 2020, 9:42 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Michael,

I am glad to hear from you.

I am simply a man learning to fish, to teach others to fish on the other side of the world, who will then teach others. My 'work' over there is woefully small at the moment, but I hope for it to grow.

Ten years ago I volunteered in regional Zambia, at an orphan unit like non I had heard of. Instead of institutionalising orphans, they housed them with extended family, and provided assistance and training to the family and the orphan. I like the model. Maintain the family unit. Train up the children in necessary life skills. And the child has someone more likely to love and nurture them. At least that's the plan. It is often worked around subsistence farming, as that is the local way of life.

I sponsored and supported for many years, in particular one who I worked alongside, and supported when he left the organisation and started an orphan unit on his own.

Wanting to help more, but being unable to volunteer anymore thanks to my own family unit growing from just me, to a family of six within a couple of years, I started studying how to farm better, how to improve soils, how to improve crop yield and have less dependance on the expensive, chemical fertilisers and pesticides that they depend on, and transport from far, at great impact of profits and impact on soil health.

Biochar came to my knowledge for the first time about two years ago.

I've emailed my friend many times teaching and instructing with links to various things. The importance of minimal till, and ground cover. Manures, composts, mulches and worms. Chicken tractors, and other regenerative farming and permaculture concepts.

I have emailed him regarding biochar and it's benefits. I have looked into char producing stoves. I didn't have much success sourcing one over there to get to him. I built one here(to use and know before I recommend), and was a little disappointed with the outcome. I think the slightly larger ones like the Seachar Estufa Finca might be a little better at handling varied feedstock(though I have not tried that one yet, mine was smaller), but he has neither the tools or the knowhow to make one. 

I had been driven by the desire to make use of the heat, as well as produce char. But have come to realise that might be letting the perfect get in the way of the good. So I am coming back around to looking at flame cap methods like the Moxham kiln, Kelpie's Ring of Fire, and your trench kiln, a simple way of dealing with waste(which likely would have been burnt anyway) and producing beneficial char.

My next email will be coming back to that, and likely touch on the urine charging that is going on in Malawi and in current conversations here.

Growth. If I can get some basic, simple, cheap but reliable and repeatable methods in place with him, I will then approach Teen Missions and AIDS Orphans and Street Kids, the group I volunteered with in the first place, and work towards these principles becoming standard training procedures with their workers, and in their various orphan units.

My thoughts in possibly starting to produce and sell biochar here in Australia were obviously with the plan to support my family, but also to gain experience in the field, with the hope of being able to pour more funds into this field, and also maybe be able to create some hands on training videos for teaching over there, and any other place that might have some access to the internet. Aiming not strictly at biochar, but also some practices from Permaculture, Regenerative Farming, and even some Korean Natural Farming.

Thank you for your time. I would be delighted to hear any input, for either the home front or the battleground.

Kind regards,

Daniel Pidgeon


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...>
Sent: Sunday, 19 April 2020 5:00 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FAQs, or Frequently Searched regarding Biochar
 
Daniel,

Please tell us more about your work in Africa. Where? When? What?

The need for anything, anything, to restore soils, mitigate the consequences of climate change and improve food security is desperate. Covid hasn't really hit yet, although it will catastrophically in a few weeks. But long after Covid is gone, Africa will be starving unless Covid reduces the population as much as the Black Death did that of medieval Europe.



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

Latest Tweet: Recent article published by Global Ground Media #airpollution #globalwarmingsolutions https://t.co/a2cdLpWF7h https://t.co/rwDykD7b9K Read More
    

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 7:59 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:

I've been composting for many years. After stumbling across biochar two years ago while searching for ways to help farmers in Africa do things a little better, I started reading and studying as much as I could about it.

Suddenly, with issues with the virus seemingly about to shut down my current business and put me on unemployment for the first time in my 25 workspan, my pipe dreams of maybe one day creating a side hustle in biochar/vermi-compost/compost/organic gardening have been given a shunt up the possibility and urgency scales! Between having more time and needing to spend it on something that supports my family, and the sudden societal consciousness of food security and resurgence in the home garden, it would seem that now might be the right time for action to take place.

I recall seeing someone post a round graph about all the frequent internet searches regarding biochar. They suggested that answering some of these would be a good start in a FAQ page on a website regarding biochar and it's uses. But now, for the life of me I cannot find it anywhere, even though I save and bookmark almost everything of note on the topic. Would someone be able to help?

Thank you,

Daniel Pidgeon