Topics

Need Help - Model for Urine/Biochar Fertilizer for Training Throughout Africa #urine #africa


Kevin McLean
 

Please help quickly create a formula.  A colleague/farmer in Uganda is planting maize next week and can test for us.

In partnership with the Catholic and Anglican churches in many African countries, we can train many millions of farmers if we keep the formula extremely simple.  (We have trained tens of millions of women to cook with rock beds in their traditional cookstoves.)

We know that urine works well as fertilizer.  We can train with urine alone.  But, it seems that adding biochar and maybe ash could substantially improve the fertilizer (Hans Peter Schmidt article)

Simplicity is more important than perfection.

Can this be done:
1.  Crush charcoal.
2.  Put the charcoal in a container.
3.  Collect urine in the container and occasionally shake.
4.  Pour the urine/biochar in the hole with the maize kernels when planting and broadcast on the ground after emergence.

If this method will work, it has several advantages:
1.  Simple and easy to train.
2.  Uses available materials.
3.  May keep the urine from smelling during collection.

My colleague has already planted most of his corn.  He has just over a week left in the planting season for this test.

I've been communicating with Mike Flynn offlist whom I expect will respond.  I also hope to tap into broader expertise of this group.

Please help.
Kevin


Environmental Industries <licusociety@...>
 

Dear all,

Combining urine fertilizer and Biochar is a new thing to me. I have worked with urine for fertilizer since 2007. On collection I don't find it necessary to shake the collection container. What matters is to leave the urine to age in airtight container after collection in order to curb the bad smell.

On application, yes you apply Biochar at planting as basal dressing but I don't apply urine as well at that stage until the crop is well established for top dressing with urine fertilizer. That way the urine will sink down the soil to mix with Biochar.

However, I wonder if we could mix urine fertilizer and Biochar prior to planting. And in what ratio.

Regards,

Goodfellow Phiri.


mikethewormguy
 

Kevin and Goodfellow,

You all have peaked my curiosity enough that I am going to do a Urine/Biochar/Wood Ash experiment using corn seed once the soil warms up a bit.  We are getting snow tommorrow.

We will need to know the nutrient composition of urine and wood ash, as well as, the volume of urine that Goodfellow applies to each corn plant along with the dilution factor.  With this info we can calculate how many grams of NPK plus is going into the soil via each application.

We also need to know at what leaf stage is the 1st urine applied, as well as, how often during the grow cycle and how many days between each....

In the coming days, I will be setting up an experimental plan on our Green Quest website. (  www.onagreenquest.net)....

I am planning on using very dilute urine soaked by char in the planting hole.

I will top dress the diluted urine and wood ash around the corn plant during the growing season.

I am also planning on priming the corn seed using a range of diluted urine concentrations.  The priming will improve germination and plant establishment. It will also assist with only using 1-2 seeds per hole.

I will also do some paper towel germination test to determine rootlet pushing time.

We will plan on documenting our work  on our website......

We are happy to work with folks and share information on this Amazing Gee Whiz project......


Mike

...."Do what you can with what you have right where you are at"....t.roosevelt.....














Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Tony Vovers
 

There is a cute little book- Liquid Gold. quite non-technical but covering the major points of recycling and reusing urine.
The standard recommendation is to extend the aging time for publicly sourced urine due to pharmaceuticals.

In a similar style, the Humanure Handbook will give a view of life from the other side
 
There is so much potential in separating and harvesting urine and humanure close to source, instead of dumping it into water, but in the western world will probably never be realized at the residential side.
Some studies claim if we could recycle "all" the urine there would be no need for any chemical fertilisers for agriculture at all. Unfortunately, the forever chemicals and the pharmaceuticals seem to be the fly in the ointment in both cases.



Tony Vovers
+62 (813) 3888 9062 (HP)


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 4:30 AM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Kevin and Goodfellow,

You all have peaked my curiosity enough that I am going to do a Urine/Biochar/Wood Ash experiment using corn seed once the soil warms up a bit.  We are getting snow tommorrow.

We will need to know the nutrient composition of urine and wood ash, as well as, the volume of urine that Goodfellow applies to each corn plant along with the dilution factor.  With this info we can calculate how many grams of NPK plus is going into the soil via each application.

We also need to know at what leaf stage is the 1st urine applied, as well as, how often during the grow cycle and how many days between each....

In the coming days, I will be setting up an experimental plan on our Green Quest website. (  www.onagreenquest.net)....

I am planning on using very dilute urine soaked by char in the planting hole.

I will top dress the diluted urine and wood ash around the corn plant during the growing season.

I am also planning on priming the corn seed using a range of diluted urine concentrations.  The priming will improve germination and plant establishment. It will also assist with only using 1-2 seeds per hole.

I will also do some paper towel germination test to determine rootlet pushing time.

We will plan on documenting our work  on our website......

We are happy to work with folks and share information on this Amazing Gee Whiz project......


Mike

...."Do what you can with what you have right where you are at"....t.roosevelt.....














Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Norm Baker
 

Kevin;

Crush the biochar. 
Fill a 5 gallon bucket with biochar.
Pee directly into it. Storing the urine does not help in any way.
No need to shake or stir. The nutrients will be completely adsorbed in a couple of hours.
When the bucket is full of both biochar and pee, pour off the water. The water will not smell of urine.
I would recommend not putting it the hole with seed. Broadcast only about 1 foot wide. Work it into the soil.
The biochar will keep the urine from smelling as long as it is used 1:1 with pee.

Norm


Anand Karve
 

Dear Kevin, 
Among its solid contents, urine contains about 56% urea. Urea is an organic compound. So it serves the soil bacteria not only as a source of C but also as a source of energy, when they oxidise NH2 to NO3. So all the urea that you apply to your soil gets consumed by soil bacteria. The NO3  is absorbed by plants. There are many farmers in India who apply only urea to their crop. This is because on per kg basis, urea is much cheaper than the phosphatic and potassic fertilizers. Applying urea alone to the field is frowned upon by the agronomists, but I have seen the fields of these farmers and saw for myself that the crops did not show any symptoms of mineral deficiency. This supports my hypothesis that the plants kill and eat the soil bacteria. Since all living being have more or less the same minerals in their cells, it does not matter to the plants as to which bacteria they are consuming.
Yours
A.D.Karve 
***
Dr. A.D. Karve

Trustee & Founder President, Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI)


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 12:10 AM Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:
Please help quickly create a formula.  A colleague/farmer in Uganda is planting maize next week and can test for us.

In partnership with the Catholic and Anglican churches in many African countries, we can train many millions of farmers if we keep the formula extremely simple.  (We have trained tens of millions of women to cook with rock beds in their traditional cookstoves.)

We know that urine works well as fertilizer.  We can train with urine alone.  But, it seems that adding biochar and maybe ash could substantially improve the fertilizer (Hans Peter Schmidt article)

Simplicity is more important than perfection.

Can this be done:
1.  Crush charcoal.
2.  Put the charcoal in a container.
3.  Collect urine in the container and occasionally shake.
4.  Pour the urine/biochar in the hole with the maize kernels when planting and broadcast on the ground after emergence.

If this method will work, it has several advantages:
1.  Simple and easy to train.
2.  Uses available materials.
3.  May keep the urine from smelling during collection.

My colleague has already planted most of his corn.  He has just over a week left in the planting season for this test.

I've been communicating with Mike Flynn offlist whom I expect will respond.  I also hope to tap into broader expertise of this group.

Please help.
Kevin


Roger Faulkner
 

If you want to optimize this little bit it's best if the amount of biochar or charcoal is enough to absorb the universe the urine so there's no liquid leakage. In order to prevent the liquid leakage you can always add a little bit of straw or any other sort of lignocellulosic waste. I believe it will be more effective to put all the biochar in with the colonel colonel rather than putting some as a top dressing later as you suggested. When is the top dressing your more likely to get the action of the d nitrifying bacteria and that waste some of the fix nitrogen fixed nitrogen.


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 5:41 AM, Anand Karve
<adkarve@...> wrote:
Dear Kevin, 
Among its solid contents, urine contains about 56% urea. Urea is an organic compound. So it serves the soil bacteria not only as a source of C but also as a source of energy, when they oxidise NH2 to NO3. So all the urea that you apply to your soil gets consumed by soil bacteria. The NO3  is absorbed by plants. There are many farmers in India who apply only urea to their crop. This is because on per kg basis, urea is much cheaper than the phosphatic and potassic fertilizers. Applying urea alone to the field is frowned upon by the agronomists, but I have seen the fields of these farmers and saw for myself that the crops did not show any symptoms of mineral deficiency. This supports my hypothesis that the plants kill and eat the soil bacteria. Since all living being have more or less the same minerals in their cells, it does not matter to the plants as to which bacteria they are consuming.
Yours
A.D.Karve 
***
Dr. A.D. Karve

Trustee & Founder President, Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI)


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 12:10 AM Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:
Please help quickly create a formula.  A colleague/farmer in Uganda is planting maize next week and can test for us.

In partnership with the Catholic and Anglican churches in many African countries, we can train many millions of farmers if we keep the formula extremely simple.  (We have trained tens of millions of women to cook with rock beds in their traditional cookstoves.)

We know that urine works well as fertilizer.  We can train with urine alone.  But, it seems that adding biochar and maybe ash could substantially improve the fertilizer (Hans Peter Schmidt article)

Simplicity is more important than perfection.

Can this be done:
1.  Crush charcoal.
2.  Put the charcoal in a container.
3.  Collect urine in the container and occasionally shake.
4.  Pour the urine/biochar in the hole with the maize kernels when planting and broadcast on the ground after emergence.

If this method will work, it has several advantages:
1.  Simple and easy to train.
2.  Uses available materials.
3.  May keep the urine from smelling during collection.

My colleague has already planted most of his corn.  He has just over a week left in the planting season for this test.

I've been communicating with Mike Flynn offlist whom I expect will respond.  I also hope to tap into broader expertise of this group.

Please help.
Kevin


Roger Faulkner
 

I think that if the urine is thoroughly soaked into the biochar could be applied at the beginning. Urine directly on plants will come to kill them.


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 8:39 AM, Roger Faulkner via groups.io
<roger_rethinker@...> wrote:
If you want to optimize this little bit it's best if the amount of biochar or charcoal is enough to absorb the universe the urine so there's no liquid leakage. In order to prevent the liquid leakage you can always add a little bit of straw or any other sort of lignocellulosic waste. I believe it will be more effective to put all the biochar in with the colonel colonel rather than putting some as a top dressing later as you suggested. When is the top dressing your more likely to get the action of the d nitrifying bacteria and that waste some of the fix nitrogen fixed nitrogen.


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 5:41 AM, Anand Karve
<adkarve@...> wrote:
Dear Kevin, 
Among its solid contents, urine contains about 56% urea. Urea is an organic compound. So it serves the soil bacteria not only as a source of C but also as a source of energy, when they oxidise NH2 to NO3. So all the urea that you apply to your soil gets consumed by soil bacteria. The NO3  is absorbed by plants. There are many farmers in India who apply only urea to their crop. This is because on per kg basis, urea is much cheaper than the phosphatic and potassic fertilizers. Applying urea alone to the field is frowned upon by the agronomists, but I have seen the fields of these farmers and saw for myself that the crops did not show any symptoms of mineral deficiency. This supports my hypothesis that the plants kill and eat the soil bacteria. Since all living being have more or less the same minerals in their cells, it does not matter to the plants as to which bacteria they are consuming.
Yours
A.D.Karve 
***
Dr. A.D. Karve

Trustee & Founder President, Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI)


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 12:10 AM Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:
Please help quickly create a formula.  A colleague/farmer in Uganda is planting maize next week and can test for us.

In partnership with the Catholic and Anglican churches in many African countries, we can train many millions of farmers if we keep the formula extremely simple.  (We have trained tens of millions of women to cook with rock beds in their traditional cookstoves.)

We know that urine works well as fertilizer.  We can train with urine alone.  But, it seems that adding biochar and maybe ash could substantially improve the fertilizer (Hans Peter Schmidt article)

Simplicity is more important than perfection.

Can this be done:
1.  Crush charcoal.
2.  Put the charcoal in a container.
3.  Collect urine in the container and occasionally shake.
4.  Pour the urine/biochar in the hole with the maize kernels when planting and broadcast on the ground after emergence.

If this method will work, it has several advantages:
1.  Simple and easy to train.
2.  Uses available materials.
3.  May keep the urine from smelling during collection.

My colleague has already planted most of his corn.  He has just over a week left in the planting season for this test.

I've been communicating with Mike Flynn offlist whom I expect will respond.  I also hope to tap into broader expertise of this group.

Please help.
Kevin


Tom Stephan <tom@...>
 

Anand,
 Thank you for including me in the loop. I have a regenerational agriculture farming concept that uses bio char and soil fertility through organic compounds with live poultry and their manure together in row crops in paddocks, that I call the "Food Forever Project". Before I begin, I wish to make test plots with various organic materials like the one mentioned here in this email. Not only tests of urea with or without bio char, but with and without manures, fish emulsions, etc. Then take those more successful methods and grow vermiculture windrows on / in them. The goal is to find the most efficient and affordable path to soil fertility. Food Forever is meant as a human relief effort for the beginning subsistence farmer to feed them selves pure organic food, grown in small acreage plots, city or country. FF will derive all irrigation from the atmosphere and be powered by solar panels. I am seeking funding for the project. You can read about the FF project on my blogs at Mother Earth News. Thank you.
 Regards, Tom Stephan.

On Mon, Apr 13, 2020, 5:41 AM Anand Karve <adkarve@...> wrote:
Dear Kevin, 
Among its solid contents, urine contains about 56% urea. Urea is an organic compound. So it serves the soil bacteria not only as a source of C but also as a source of energy, when they oxidise NH2 to NO3. So all the urea that you apply to your soil gets consumed by soil bacteria. The NO3  is absorbed by plants. There are many farmers in India who apply only urea to their crop. This is because on per kg basis, urea is much cheaper than the phosphatic and potassic fertilizers. Applying urea alone to the field is frowned upon by the agronomists, but I have seen the fields of these farmers and saw for myself that the crops did not show any symptoms of mineral deficiency. This supports my hypothesis that the plants kill and eat the soil bacteria. Since all living being have more or less the same minerals in their cells, it does not matter to the plants as to which bacteria they are consuming.
Yours
A.D.Karve 
***
Dr. A.D. Karve

Trustee & Founder President, Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI)


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 12:10 AM Kevin McLean <info@...> wrote:
Please help quickly create a formula.  A colleague/farmer in Uganda is planting maize next week and can test for us.

In partnership with the Catholic and Anglican churches in many African countries, we can train many millions of farmers if we keep the formula extremely simple.  (We have trained tens of millions of women to cook with rock beds in their traditional cookstoves.)

We know that urine works well as fertilizer.  We can train with urine alone.  But, it seems that adding biochar and maybe ash could substantially improve the fertilizer (Hans Peter Schmidt article)

Simplicity is more important than perfection.

Can this be done:
1.  Crush charcoal.
2.  Put the charcoal in a container.
3.  Collect urine in the container and occasionally shake.
4.  Pour the urine/biochar in the hole with the maize kernels when planting and broadcast on the ground after emergence.

If this method will work, it has several advantages:
1.  Simple and easy to train.
2.  Uses available materials.
3.  May keep the urine from smelling during collection.

My colleague has already planted most of his corn.  He has just over a week left in the planting season for this test.

I've been communicating with Mike Flynn offlist whom I expect will respond.  I also hope to tap into broader expertise of this group.

Please help.
Kevin


Shaked From
 

Hi,
this is a little part of an article I wrote a few months ago, I think it adds a few point of interest to the discussion.

the reason we went for a larger container - 200L drum, is that otherwise the whole process becomes another regular ‘chore’ and by using a large container, there is a job to do only increase in a few months - fits better for household use.

It is now 3/4 full, so soon will be ready to use.


“...it is said that approximately 80% of the nutrients consumed by an adult are excreted through urine, (much of the rest is in the feces). A great guide and general report with a wealth of useful information on the use of urine can be found here:

http://www.ecosanres.org/pdf_files/ESR2010-1-PracticalGuidanceOnTheUseOfUrineInCropProduction.pdf


An average person might produce approx. 1.5 litres of urine per day. On average, 1 litre of human urine may contain 10g of nitrogen, 1g of phosphorus and 4g of potassium (10-1-4) as well as small amounts of other nutrients.


Urine, while exposed to oxygen, tends to react - oxidise, in that process the N in urine is converted to one of its very volatile forms - ammonia and is quickly lost. Therefore urine needs to be used quickly or excluded from air.

Bacteria in the soil tends to flourish on N, when one applies N to the soil, bacteria can consume it quickly, multiplying en masses, in that same process, bacteria tends to consume 5 times the amount of carbon (converting it to CO2), and so, when we apply urine (or other N source directly to our soils) we might be losing up to 5 times more carbon just from this interaction.

1 litre of urine = 10g N = 50g C

This is one way in which we lose soil carbon and structure.

The proposed solution is to mix urine with biochar in sealed containers for a couple of months, thus preventing oxidation, adding soil carbon and charging/ activating biochar.

As an experiment, and before constructing a permanent system, we have established a simple method:

A tap was installed at the bottom of a 200 litre plastic drum with an airtight lid. The tap is connected through a flange, and into a slotted pipe inside the drum, this is in order to prevent blockage. The drum was filled with raw biochar. The lid was placed, it also has a small 20mm plug on the lid. Regularly, urine is poured into the drum through the small plug, allowing the least amount of oxygen in. Small amounts of vinegar are mixed with the urine, this lower pH further reduces oxygenation and odorous. Once the biochar is saturated, and the drum is full, the urine will be drained through the bottom tap, this liquid will be already saturated with carbon, and ready to be applied into the soil in a test plot. The drum will be opened, and the fully saturated biochar will be ready to be mixed into the soil in another test plot.”



John Hofmeyr
 

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 12:06 PM, Environmental Industries wrote:
@Goodfellow wrote "On application, yes you apply Biochar at planting as basal dressing but I don't apply urine as well at that stage ..."
Here is a caveat: If fresh biochar is added to soil, the first thing it will do is to adsorb moisture and nutrients from the bulk soil onto the pore surfaces. In the absence of microbiota having colonised the biochar, the moisture and nutrients will be removed from access by the plants. I advocate always "charging" the biochar with moisture, nutrients and preferably also with microorganisms, before addition to soil. i.e. by co-composting or by addition to vermicomposting. I cannot think of a better way to charge biochar with moisture, nutrients and microbiota than passing it through an earthworm's gut.


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Sounds good - provided you have enough char. Where you don't have enough to surface dress, we suggest that you dig hole, drop in a handful of char mix (ideally including a fair amount of manure or compost), push in some dirt, put in a couple of seeds and then cover with the rest of the dirt.


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020, 7:49 AM Norm Baker <ntbakerphd@...> wrote:
Kevin;

Crush the biochar. 
Fill a 5 gallon bucket with biochar.
Pee directly into it. Storing the urine does not help in any way.
No need to shake or stir. The nutrients will be completely adsorbed in a couple of hours.
When the bucket is full of both biochar and pee, pour off the water. The water will not smell of urine.
I would recommend not putting it the hole with seed. Broadcast only about 1 foot wide. Work it into the soil.
The biochar will keep the urine from smelling as long as it is used 1:1 with pee.

Norm


Kevin McLean
 

Hi Michael,

Thanks for all of your ideas.  Are these good instructions:
1.  Soak the biochar in urine for at least a couple days.
2.  Drain the urine.  (It is okay if the biochar dries out.  It can be used wet or dry.)
3.  Dig a hole for planting.
4.  Put a handful of biochar in the hole.
5.  Put a handful of soil on the biochar.
6.  Mix the biochar and soil.
7.  Drop the seeds/kernels on the biochar/soil mixture.
8.  Cover the hole with soil.

With what crops have you used this method successfully.

Thank you,
Kevin

Kevin McLean, President
Sun24
Tampa, Florida, USA
+1 (813) 505-3340

                     


On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 7:49 AM d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...> wrote:
Sounds good - provided you have enough char. Where you don't have enough to surface dress, we suggest that you dig hole, drop in a handful of char mix (ideally including a fair amount of manure or compost), push in some dirt, put in a couple of seeds and then cover with the rest of the dirt.

On Mon, Apr 13, 2020, 7:49 AM Norm Baker <ntbakerphd@...> wrote:
Kevin;

Crush the biochar. 
Fill a 5 gallon bucket with biochar.
Pee directly into it. Storing the urine does not help in any way.
No need to shake or stir. The nutrients will be completely adsorbed in a couple of hours.
When the bucket is full of both biochar and pee, pour off the water. The water will not smell of urine.
I would recommend not putting it the hole with seed. Broadcast only about 1 foot wide. Work it into the soil.
The biochar will keep the urine from smelling as long as it is used 1:1 with pee.

Norm


Kim Chaffee
 

All,

I thought you all should know about the Rich Earth Institute, headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont USA.  They are working to erase the stigma regarding human urine and feces, to improve sanitation worldwide, and to use these valuable resources for promoting world health.  Please visit their website below and watch their funny video.  Like me, you can sign up to be on their email list.  Thanks.

Kim Chaffee 


From their latest email:

Annual Urine Donor Kick-Off goes virtual! April 30, 5:30 PM

Join us for our annual community gathering and a screening of the film Mr. Toilet. Before the film, we will unveil the 2019 Piss-off Contest winners. We will share our latest news at Rich Earth and let you know how you can become a urine donor if you live nearby and haven’t started collecting yet. The film screening will begin at 6:00 PM, followed by a discussion with the director, Libby Zepeda.

It’s time to break the toilet taboo! 2.6 billion people worldwide do not have access to sanitation. Join us as we uplift critical conversations about the struggle for global sanitation equity. Watch the Mr. Toilet trailer below.

Please RSVP to receive a Zoom invitation.
 
RSVP

Schedule: 

5:30 - Welcome and Piss-off Award Ceremony

6:00 - Screening of Mr. Toilet: The World's #2 Man

7:30 - Q & A with Director Lily Zepeda 

This event is free but we would welcome your donations. All proceeds for this event will support Rich Earth’s capital campaign to buy our building and secure a permanent home for urine recycling in Brattleboro. 
 
Watch the Mr. Toilet trailor here!

What people are saying:

"Mr. Toilet reveals how bathroom humor can change the world. Jack Sim might shock people, but he’s raising awareness about sanitation issues on a global scale." ~ The Wrap

"Mr Toilet is flushed with fun." ~ FF2 Media

"The film succeeds in creating an intimate portrait of a quirky, and eccentric individual full of compassion, love and wit who uses his ingenuity and skills to create a meaningful dialogue on shit." ~ The Extra Mile


On Apr 12, 2020, at 5:16 PM, Tony Vovers <vovers1@...> wrote:

There is a cute little book- Liquid Gold. quite non-technical but covering the major points of recycling and reusing urine.
The standard recommendation is to extend the aging time for publicly sourced urine due to pharmaceuticals.

In a similar style, the Humanure Handbook will give a view of life from the other side
 
There is so much potential in separating and harvesting urine and humanure close to source, instead of dumping it into water, but in the western world will probably never be realized at the residential side.
Some studies claim if we could recycle "all" the urine there would be no need for any chemical fertilisers for agriculture at all. Unfortunately, the forever chemicals and the pharmaceuticals seem to be the fly in the ointment in both cases.



Tony Vovers
+62 (813) 3888 9062 (HP)


On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 4:30 AM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Kevin and Goodfellow,

You all have peaked my curiosity enough that I am going to do a Urine/Biochar/Wood Ash experiment using corn seed once the soil warms up a bit.  We are getting snow tommorrow.

We will need to know the nutrient composition of urine and wood ash, as well as, the volume of urine that Goodfellow applies to each corn plant along with the dilution factor.  With this info we can calculate how many grams of NPK plus is going into the soil via each application.

We also need to know at what leaf stage is the 1st urine applied, as well as, how often during the grow cycle and how many days between each....

In the coming days, I will be setting up an experimental plan on our Green Quest website. (  www.onagreenquest.net)....

I am planning on using very dilute urine soaked by char in the planting hole.

I will top dress the diluted urine and wood ash around the corn plant during the growing season.

I am also planning on priming the corn seed using a range of diluted urine concentrations.  The priming will improve germination and plant establishment. It will also assist with only using 1-2 seeds per hole.

I will also do some paper towel germination test to determine rootlet pushing time.

We will plan on documenting our work  on our website......

We are happy to work with folks and share information on this Amazing Gee Whiz project......


Mike

...."Do what you can with what you have right where you are at"....t.roosevelt.....














Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone





Kim Chaffee
 

All,

I thought you all should know about the Rich Earth Institute, headquartered in Brattleboro, Vermont USA.  They are working to erase the stigma regarding human urine and feces, to improve sanitation worldwide, and to use these valuable resources for promoting world health.  Please visit their website below and watch their funny video.  Like me, you can sign up to be on their email list.  Thanks.

Kim Chaffee 


From their latest email:

Annual Urine Donor Kick-Off goes virtual! April 30, 5:30 PM

Join us for our annual community gathering and a screening of the film Mr. Toilet. Before the film, we will unveil the 2019 Piss-off Contest winners. We will share our latest news at Rich Earth and let you know how you can become a urine donor if you live nearby and haven’t started collecting yet. The film screening will begin at 6:00 PM, followed by a discussion with the director, Libby Zepeda.

It’s time to break the toilet taboo! 2.6 billion people worldwide do not have access to sanitation. Join us as we uplift critical conversations about the struggle for global sanitation equity. Watch the Mr. Toilet trailer below.

Please RSVP to receive a Zoom invitation.
 
RSVP

Schedule: 

5:30 - Welcome and Piss-off Award Ceremony

6:00 - Screening of Mr. Toilet: The World's #2 Man

7:30 - Q & A with Director Lily Zepeda 

This event is free but we would welcome your donations. All proceeds for this event will support Rich Earth’s capital campaign to buy our building and secure a permanent home for urine recycling in Brattleboro. 
 
Watch the Mr. Toilet trailor here!

What people are saying:

"Mr. Toilet reveals how bathroom humor can change the world. Jack Sim might shock people, but he’s raising awareness about sanitation issues on a global scale." ~ The Wrap

"Mr Toilet is flushed with fun." ~ FF2 Media

"The film succeeds in creating an intimate portrait of a quirky, and eccentric individual full of compassion, love and wit who uses his ingenuity and skills to create a meaningful dialogue on shit." ~ The Extra Mile


On Apr 12, 2020, at 3:05 PM, Environmental Industries <licusociety@...> wrote:

Dear all,

Combining urine fertilizer and Biochar is a new thing to me. I have worked with urine for fertilizer since 2007. On collection I don't find it necessary to shake the collection container. What matters is to leave the urine to age in airtight container after collection in order to curb the bad smell.

On application, yes you apply Biochar at planting as basal dressing but I don't apply urine as well at that stage until the crop is well established for top dressing with urine fertilizer. That way the urine will sink down the soil to mix with Biochar.

However, I wonder if we could mix urine fertilizer and Biochar prior to planting. And in what ratio.

Regards,

Goodfellow Phiri.


Environmental Industries <licusociety@...>
 

Dear chatter,

I am not sure whether or not I already responded to the article.

To apply urine fertilizer to corn for best results, apply compost or Biochar as basal dressing to a planting station. After the corn germinates and is 5 weeks old apply urine fertilizer. Dilute it 1:10 with water. Apply 300mls per planting station. However, dilution and application rates change with the crop.

You can apply once, or twice per lifespan of the crop. For perennial crops, you apply monthly.


On Sun, Apr 12, 2020, 10:30 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io wrote:
Kevin and Goodfellow,

You all have peaked my curiosity enough that I am going to do a Urine/Biochar/Wood Ash experiment using corn seed once the soil warms up a bit.  We are getting snow tommorrow.

We will need to know the nutrient composition of urine and wood ash, as well as, the volume of urine that Goodfellow applies to each corn plant along with the dilution factor.  With this info we can calculate how many grams of NPK plus is going into the soil via each application.

We also need to know at what leaf stage is the 1st urine applied, as well as, how often during the grow cycle and how many days between each....

In the coming days, I will be setting up an experimental plan on our Green Quest website. (  www.onagreenquest.net)....

I am planning on using very dilute urine soaked by char in the planting hole.

I will top dress the diluted urine and wood ash around the corn plant during the growing season.

I am also planning on priming the corn seed using a range of diluted urine concentrations.  The priming will improve germination and plant establishment. It will also assist with only using 1-2 seeds per hole.

I will also do some paper towel germination test to determine rootlet pushing time.

We will plan on documenting our work  on our website......

We are happy to work with folks and share information on this Amazing Gee Whiz project......


Mike

...."Do what you can with what you have right where you are at"....t.roosevelt.....














Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


mikethewormguy
 

Goodfellow,

Do you growOkra in your area.....?

Have started to collect urine for my upcoming corn crop....   Am pre-germinating the corn seed and growing corn transplants.

Also added a homemade essential oil emulsion to the urine collected to assist in long term storage.

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Environmental Industries <licusociety@...>
 

Dear M,

No, I don't grow Okra in my garden. However, I believe urine fertilizer can work well on okra too. We have applied to tomatoes and green peas before.

For long term storage, you don't need to add anything to the urine. It stores well for 6 months for applying to crops, longer than that you can apply it to compost manure.


On Sat, Apr 25, 2020, 4:22 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io wrote:
Goodfellow,

Do you growOkra in your area.....?

Have started to collect urine for my upcoming corn crop....   Am pre-germinating the corn seed and growing corn transplants.

Also added a homemade essential oil emulsion to the urine collected to assist in long term storage.

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


mikethewormguy
 

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 09:02 AM, Environmental Industries wrote:
Dear M,
 
No, I don't grow Okra in my garden. However, I believe urine fertilizer can work well on okra too. We have applied to tomatoes and green peas before.
 
For long term storage, you don't need to add anything to the urine. It stores well for 6 months for applying to crops, longer than that you can apply it to compost manure.
 

On Sat, Apr 25, 2020, 4:22 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io wrote:
Goodfellow,
 
Do you growOkra in your area.....?
 
Have started to collect urine for my upcoming corn crop....   Am pre-germinating the corn seed and growing corn transplants.
 
Also added a homemade essential oil emulsion to the urine collected to assist in long term storage.
 
Mike
 
 
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

 G.

Adding the emulsified essential oil to the urine adds complexity to the poopourri aroma.......

M.


Kelpie Wilson
 

I just ferment my urine with biochar and EM-1. Nothing better than pickled pee and poo.

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Email: kelpiew@...
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Skype: kelpie.wilson