Topics

Biochar material use in human remains composting #compost #cremation


Roger Faulkner
 

in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.


On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list:

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 



On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.



 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 



If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 



 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   
real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 


Roger Faulkner
 

I said earlier that I would give a link to what I wrote about the body composting concept. I thought I had written something exclusively about the use of biochar in that process, but it turns out it was only in the patent application. I am looking for someone with whom to pursue this idea as an entrepreneurial venture. 





Thanks,
Roger Faulkner
Mobile: 980-250-4683
Living in a Wheelchair Linktree:
Inventions Linktree: 



On Monday, April 20, 2020, 09:15:57 AM EDT, Roger Faulkner <roger_rethinker@...> wrote:


in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.


On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list:

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 



On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.



 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 



If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 



 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   
real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 


Charles Hegberg
 

Always tell my wife and kids I would rather be charred than turned to ash.  That way I will never go away and at least be useful rather than just side in a box on the shelf somewhere. 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 20, 2020 2:26 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

 

I said earlier that I would give a link to what I wrote about the body composting concept. I thought I had written something exclusively about the use of biochar in that process, but it turns out it was only in the patent application. I am looking for someone with whom to pursue this idea as an entrepreneurial venture. 

 

 

 


Image removed by sender.

A New Alternative to Burial and Cremation

Roger Faulkner

End of Life Care is a $20B a year industry in the US. It would be fair to say that it is not an environmentally ...

 

 

 

Thanks,

Roger Faulkner

Mobile: 980-250-4683

Living in a Wheelchair Linktree:

Inventions Linktree: 

 

 

 

On Monday, April 20, 2020, 09:15:57 AM EDT, Roger Faulkner <roger_rethinker@...> wrote:

 

 

in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

 

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

 

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 

 

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

 

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

 

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.

 

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.

 

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 

 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.

 

On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson

<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list:

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 

 

On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.

 

 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 

 

If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 

 

 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   
real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 


Dick Gallien
 

The Winona Farm's 175 acres is 3 mi. from the center of Winona, but
protected from it's 30K by a 500' ridge, a Conservation Easement with
the Mn. Land Trust and a 3 acre natural burial site. The City Mgr.
said that if in a 501C3 he would pay it to be the City Compost Site
and turn it's waste wood into biochar and lumber vs torching it:
however being on the Board of a compost site lacks "luster", so I
offered to donate the farm to the U of Mn, naively assuming that since
the entire state torches waste wood, just $5 for a yearly permit and
the U's Mortuary Degree is the only one connected with it's Medical
School and our burial systems are surely the most unsustainable
processed imaginable, the City Mgr. would support hauling all their
"waste wood" to the farm tomorrow. Paul Anderson was visiting when
Winona's Sustainability Coordinator and their Forester visited.

Feb. 18, a U of Mn. van with 8 visited The Farm. If donated to the U,
they would have the right to sell it, plus being a compost site and
natural burial site didn't fit the U's purposes. I wrote Mn350,
offering The Farm. They have 11 full time employees, but haven't had
the time to even write "No thanks". Any suggestions? At 88, time is
running out. Thanks, Dick

http://www.winonapost.com/News/ArticleID/67452/Southeast-Partnership-now-accepting-proposals-for-community-projects

https://www.winonapost.com/Archives/ArticleID/33371/The-Meadow


Eli Fishpaw
 

I really like the idea of human remains being composted.  I like the hope that the elements of my body will be transformed into new life, completely taking away the identity as me.  Aerobically is better for the environment avoiding methane emissions of anaerobically.  A few years ago a friend of mine died of cancer.  He was an alternative lifestyle type guy.  We wrapped his body in cloth linen, dug a hole in the ground, set compost in the bottom, set his body above, covered in additional compost and topped off with stones that would prevent animals from digging. 

A few months ago when I was digging a trench for the flame cap method of creating char, it occurred to me what a great grave site it would make.  I hope to have many more years.  However, this gives a more positive meaning the phrase, "He is digging his own grave.". 

Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Hegberg [mailto:chegberg@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 18:36:13 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

Always tell my wife and kids I would rather be charred than turned to ash.  That way I will never go away and at least be useful rather than just side in a box on the shelf somewhere. 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 20, 2020 2:26 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

 

I said earlier that I would give a link to what I wrote about the body composting concept. I thought I had written something exclusively about the use of biochar in that process, but it turns out it was only in the patent application. I am looking for someone with whom to pursue this idea as an entrepreneurial venture. 

 

 

 
 

 


A New Alternative to Burial and Cremation

Roger Faulkner

End of Life Care is a $20B a year industry in the US. It would be fair to say that it is not an environmentally ...

 

 

 

Thanks,

Roger Faulkner

Mobile: 980-250-4683

Living in a Wheelchair Linktree:

Inventions Linktree: 

 

 

 

On Monday, April 20, 2020, 09:15:57 AM EDT, Roger Faulkner <roger_rethinker@...> wrote:

 

 

in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

 

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

 

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 

 

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

 

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

 

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.

 

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.

 

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 

 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.

 

On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson

<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list:

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 

 

On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.

 

 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 

 

If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 

 

 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   
real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 

 


Kathleen Draper
 

Long ago I mused about how biochar could improve the sustainability of the burial industry though not quite in the way Roger is talking about. I even suggested  caskets made out of biochar (dubbed the xPyre casket). In the 6 years since I wrote that, I think we are closer than ever to being able to make that happen...more news on that soon...don't mean to be too crypt-ic (😉) but there are some exciting biochar materials coming out once the pandemic subsides and supply chains reboot.

More recently I wrote about biochar in the time of corona and mentioned carbonization as a more meaningful means of keeping more of a loved ones remains from returning skyward. Carbon to carbon instead of ashes to ashes, makes a whole lot more sense to me!

http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/burying-carbon-for-good/
http://fingerlakesbiochar.com/biochar-in-the-time-of-coronavirus/


Tom Miles
 

Composting human remains is now legal in the US state of Washington.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eli Fishpaw
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2020 7:07 AM
To: chegberg@...; main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

 

I really like the idea of human remains being composted.  I like the hope that the elements of my body will be transformed into new life, completely taking away the identity as me.  Aerobically is better for the environment avoiding methane emissions of anaerobically.  A few years ago a friend of mine died of cancer.  He was an alternative lifestyle type guy.  We wrapped his body in cloth linen, dug a hole in the ground, set compost in the bottom, set his body above, covered in additional compost and topped off with stones that would prevent animals from digging. 

A few months ago when I was digging a trench for the flame cap method of creating char, it occurred to me what a great grave site it would make.  I hope to have many more years.  However, this gives a more positive meaning the phrase, "He is digging his own grave.". 

Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Hegberg [mailto:chegberg@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 18:36:13 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

Always tell my wife and kids I would rather be charred than turned to ash.  That way I will never go away and at least be useful rather than just side in a box on the shelf somewhere. 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 20, 2020 2:26 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

 

I said earlier that I would give a link to what I wrote about the body composting concept. I thought I had written something exclusively about the use of biochar in that process, but it turns out it was only in the patent application. I am looking for someone with whom to pursue this idea as an entrepreneurial venture. 

 

 

 

 

 

A New Alternative to Burial and Cremation

Roger Faulkner

End of Life Care is a $20B a year industry in the US. It would be fair to say that it is not an environmentally ...

 

 

 

Thanks,

Roger Faulkner

Mobile: 980-250-4683

Living in a Wheelchair Linktree:

Inventions Linktree: 

 

 

 

On Monday, April 20, 2020, 09:15:57 AM EDT, Roger Faulkner <roger_rethinker@...> wrote:

 

 

in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

 

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

 

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 

 

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

 

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

 

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.

 

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.

 

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 

 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.

 

On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson

<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list:

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 

 

On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.

 

 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 

 

If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 

 

 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   “real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 

 


Rick Wilson
 

We’ve put a coyote carcass into a compost CASP, which forces air through.  You can not put a carcass into a windrow compost pile because the regulations require that you turn it every five days.
The carcass did not compost within the 30-day period, not even close.  And you will still have bones, that you will need to grind, not unlike what happens when you are cremated.
So we dropped the idea.
Rick

On Apr 21, 2020, at 8:02 AM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Composting human remains is now legal in the US state of Washington. 
 
Tom
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eli Fishpaw
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2020 7:07 AM
To: chegberg@...; main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting
 

I really like the idea of human remains being composted.  I like the hope that the elements of my body will be transformed into new life, completely taking away the identity as me.  Aerobically is better for the environment avoiding methane emissions of anaerobically.  A few years ago a friend of mine died of cancer.  He was an alternative lifestyle type guy.  We wrapped his body in cloth linen, dug a hole in the ground, set compost in the bottom, set his body above, covered in additional compost and topped off with stones that would prevent animals from digging.  

A few months ago when I was digging a trench for the flame cap method of creating char, it occurred to me what a great grave site it would make.  I hope to have many more years.  However, this gives a more positive meaning the phrase, "He is digging his own grave.". 

Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Hegberg [mailto:chegberg@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 18:36:13 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

Always tell my wife and kids I would rather be charred than turned to ash.  That way I will never go away and at least be useful rather than just side in a box on the shelf somewhere. 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 20, 2020 2:26 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting
 
I said earlier that I would give a link to what I wrote about the body composting concept. I thought I had written something exclusively about the use of biochar in that process, but it turns out it was only in the patent application. I am looking for someone with whom to pursue this idea as an entrepreneurial venture. 
 
 
 
 
 

A New Alternative to Burial and Cremation

Roger Faulkner

End of Life Care is a $20B a year industry in the US. It would be fair to say that it is not an environmentally ...
 
 
 
Thanks,
Roger Faulkner
Mobile: 980-250-4683
Living in a Wheelchair Linktree:
Inventions Linktree: 
 
 
 
On Monday, April 20, 2020, 09:15:57 AM EDT, Roger Faulkner <roger_rethinker@...> wrote: 
 
 
in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.
 
I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.
 
The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 
 
I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.
 
The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.
 
The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.
 
I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.
 
The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 
 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.

 
On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves. 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid. 

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list: 

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 

 

On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.

 

 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 

 

If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 

 

 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   “real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 

 



mikethewormguy
 

Tom,

My wife and I have already picked out our compost bins when our time comes......

Pushing up future daisies..........

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


greg geisler
 

Haven't posted in a while but this is a subject that I have been researching for a few years.

There are many natural burial places where one can return their elements naturally. The plots we looked at here outside of Austin, Texas were decent but still rather expensive. 

I love the ReCompose idea but it also appears pricey in addition to being geographically inconvenient. 

So, I've decided to donate my remains to a forensic lab at Texas State University in San Marcos, TX. https://www.txstate.edu/anthropology/facts/donations/Body.html
I like the idea that my body will decay naturally and I have read some reports that Black Soldier Fly larvae break down the body which is also meaningful to me as BSF larvae are an amazing native beneficial insect and we have had a colony of them in our backyard for the past 6 years composting 100% of our kitchen waste for 8 months of the year (they like high temps). That is also a solution for carrion as they can break down carbon life in hours. They are THE most efficient means of composting and produce protein (larvae) and compost. 

100 pounds of kitchen waste can be converted to 20 pounds of protein and 5 pounds of compost in a matter of weeks.

I have a blog post with more info here:

I believe that the BSF (considered to be the second most important insect after the honeybee) are a great option for a return-to-earth burial solution.

g



Roger Faulkner
 

Thank you so much Greg for informing me about these black soldier flies. I will communicate with you separately with some ideas about this. But this idea I'm presenting right now is one that dates back to when I was a teenager and I'm 65 years old now.

If the crude municipal solid waste from commercial waste disposal was placed into the right sort of situation then animals could get into it and remove the waste from things like metal cans containing say tomato sauce residue. I think only insects rats and pigs would have a chance getting to all of the food. 

Americans have a great resistance to the idea of eating something that is a waste product or anything that is fed directly by waste products, such animals are never eaten directly by humans in America. 

My solution is to find an insect that can harvest the waste value of municipal solid waste, and then afterwards would have a strong affinity for flying towards a certain kind of light. I believe that it is possible to harvest most or nearly all of the protein value by collecting the flies in this way. 

My thought was that the very first flies to the light would be allowed to lay their eggs on the next batch of garbage. By controlling the generational cycles in this way most of the protein could be harvested and fed to fish which would make it more acceptable to most people.

I hadn't thought about that idea for years until I saw your answer to my post.


On Tue, Apr 21, 2020 at 6:18 PM, greg geisler
<geigreg@...> wrote:
Haven't posted in a while but this is a subject that I have been researching for a few years.

There are many natural burial places where one can return their elements naturally. The plots we looked at here outside of Austin, Texas were decent but still rather expensive. 

I love the ReCompose idea but it also appears pricey in addition to being geographically inconvenient. 

So, I've decided to donate my remains to a forensic lab at Texas State University in San Marcos, TX. https://www.txstate.edu/anthropology/facts/donations/Body.html
I like the idea that my body will decay naturally and I have read some reports that Black Soldier Fly larvae break down the body which is also meaningful to me as BSF larvae are an amazing native beneficial insect and we have had a colony of them in our backyard for the past 6 years composting 100% of our kitchen waste for 8 months of the year (they like high temps). That is also a solution for carrion as they can break down carbon life in hours. They are THE most efficient means of composting and produce protein (larvae) and compost. 

100 pounds of kitchen waste can be converted to 20 pounds of protein and 5 pounds of compost in a matter of weeks.

I have a blog post with more info here:

I believe that the BSF (considered to be the second most important insect after the honeybee) are a great option for a return-to-earth burial solution.

g



Dick Gallien
 

Thanks for your responses. This is my first response when Googling
"human cremation history" "U.S. Cremation Society: $1,295 | Lowest
Cost in Southern MN‎"
It's reassuring to know how valuable our corpses are to the circling
turkey vultures. A B.S.
requrement of the "Program of Mortuary Science - UMN Medical School"
must include a course in showing real concern for the grieving, while
adding to the $20 billion yearly burial costs.
.
Observing our first born in a Boston Hospital 66 yrs. ago, to a Ma.
Gen nursing student, her breasts were bound and she had been given a
shot to dry her up, saying our dau. wouldn't nurse. Asking the nurse
to bring dau. Wendy, from wherever she was hidden, I took the bandages
off, she nursed and I changed nothing at 23, making some deserved
comments to the Dr.. Back then, 85% of mothers bottle fed, because
the Dr. said so, supported by money in formula and none in breast
feeding. We went home the next day, I biked from the S. Boston Project
to the Boston Library, checked out "Childbirth Without Fear" and 1
yr. later we delivered 9.6 Doug at home and he nursed. Mothers, not
the med. profession turned it around, but that the authority figures
and money could so easily con human mothers, when all mammals,
including mice, humans and elephants, have thrived only because of
breast milk, since their beginning.

In a 1961 Soils Course at Michigan State with 50 farm boys I mentioned
"Plowmans Folly" by Ed Faulkner and organic benefits. I still
remember Dr. Foth's angry words, "You can't increase the % of organic
matter in a farm field, it is like adding brush to a brush fire" and
the farm boys got the message. It was what Dr. Earl Butz, former Dean
of Ag. at Purdue and Sec. of Ag. called a bunch of quacks and
consumers, who are forcing change, so even Walmart carries organic
foods.

https://www.winonadailynews.com/opinion/letters/dick-gallien-there-s-a-better-way-to-burn-waste/article_657201bb-8de3-5a60-aa83-c73b4384e208.html

Dream absurdly: The courageous U of Mn. accepts the donation of this
Farm, acquires 4 flat acres connecting Winona with I-90, that adjoin a
16 acre Winona Farm field that is protected from development for
natural/green burial, with no markers, just GPS. A field of prairie
grasses and flowers, where bobolink and meadowlark can safely nest,
where at $1,000 a body, at the density of Arlington = $1mil per acre.
For those that have watched
https://grow.foodrevolution.org/ A Green Power House by Michael
Smith, built on those 4 acres, fueled by Winona's "waste wood" a term
accepted and unchallenged by U of Mn's Forestry Dept. and others
across this country.

The Mn. State Ag. Dept. encourages composting cows, horses, etc..
Winona's 2 papers wouldn't accept my letter saying that if it's good
enough for a 1400 lb. cow or horse--why not me. I like Eli's
suggestions. Seven Novembers ago I was having trouble digging through
a few inches of frozen ground with my backhoe, so dug,"my hole",
removed the brickyard clay and replaced it with compost and leaves
stacked 5' above ground, which the Belted Galloway bedded on,
fertilizing after a rest. A flame cap in ones hole would leave an
ideal absorbent cushion. The Mn. Land Trust isn't allowing me markers,
which is fine, so instead of Eli's stones to prevent diggers, I'll use
a stiff metal chicken mesh fence, hooked to a solar electric fencer,
so compost can be added, until all that organic action settles down.
Beef hay can be made after the Bobolink head for S. America. I was
paid by the USDA Soil Bank to let that field sit from 1956 to 66 and
the CRP from 1987 (when we were paid $57,500 on the Fed. Dairy Herd
buy Out, to have our 40 milk cows and other female dairy animals
slaughtered and not have another female dairy animal on the farm for 5
yrs.. I didn't mow for 10 yrs. and had a forest of boxelder, aspen
and buckthorn moving in. From 600 to 800 Wi. dairy farmers quit
milking in 2019. Changing times, as you all know.
Thanks, Dick





On 4/21/20, mikethewormguy via groups.io
<mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Tom,My wife and I have already picked out our compost bins when our time
comes......Pushing up future daisies..........MikeSent from my Verizon,
Samsung Galaxy smartphone



--
Dick Gallien
22501 East Burns Valley Road
Winona MN 55987
dickgallien@gmail.com [507] 312 0194
www.thefarm.winona-mn.us

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not
possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures,
questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education,
while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the
imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that
there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose
of their confinement, it is too late.
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Anand Karve
 

I read somewhere that the (red) Indians fertilized corn by burying a small fish near each corn seedling. A person I know (an Indian Indian) has instructed his family to bury his body and to plant a tree on top of it.
Yours
A.D.Karve

On Mon 20 Apr, 2020, 6:46 PM Roger Faulkner via groups.io <roger_rethinker=yahoo.com@groups.io wrote:
in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be gross about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a pH of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium hydroxide, and can rather use tripotassium phosphate. 

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis of the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure I have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic acid.

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done with the proteinaceous portion of my body.

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it prevents putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for composting. That appeals to me. 

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my method being used.


On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@...> wrote:


Roger,

 

Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.   Is any about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>; main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@...
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and PyCCS

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent. This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a mixture potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

 

I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of. Tesla motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the beginning. They're probably a lot of other examples as well. 

 

Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for this application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable production to begin on a commercial basis. 

 

I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications. 

 

Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to do that is to make money.

 

Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per kilogram or something like that.

 

I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary election, more than 50,000 votes.

 

On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

Professor Kammann and biochar list:

 

Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped much of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue - mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who was the major part of today’s thread comments.

 

This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.    I’d not seen the one by Galinposki.  

 

 

See below

 



On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...> wrote:

 

Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

 

We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can see.

[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.   I’ve previously read and greatly admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..   The titles don’t use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.



 

However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls – breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that weathers again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal health).

[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);     "Well, if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1 billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone Valley, but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the yields of most crops by 30% or so.

I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be broader than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar is any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say next.

 

For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial material use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed, or materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building materials.

 

No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe, there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its use without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of Wild-wild-West, in the US?

[RWL3:   I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal” definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.  But California seems to be getting close.   It is worse than being “wild”.

 

Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers. Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres that they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s a fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.) Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed here.

 

[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to me. 



If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed options. And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al. 2016”)

[RWL5.   We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).   Your team has done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering CO2.

But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as two of”?

I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but I agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.   I see that the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to have done a nice job.

I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of this paper.

 

Claudia:   Good to have you commenting here.   I understand the term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being lost by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how to solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include the word “biochar” in future papers' titles

 

 

The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list fault.

 

Ron

 



 

best, Claudia

 

PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

 

Von: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Frank Strie
Gesendet: Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
An: main@Biochar.groups.io
Betreff: [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

 

RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of   
real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek) 
Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to manage fire.  … 
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <goreau@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is Growing.

 

Ron,

 

Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am normally a pretty good close reader.

 

 

<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

 


Dick Gallien
 

Thanks Roger, just 88. Two days ago a woman from town wrote, with many
questions, about being buried here, A few exchanges and we were
smiling about wanting to be reassured as to our safety with one we
would spend eternity with. (our politicized microbes might become
combative, if within 6'). With your "green Rep" in mind, told her in
my desperation to
keep this a farm/compost site for Winonans, I called the founder of
Ashley Furniture in Fl.. He's 78 and grew up on a rented farm near
here. I visited with his wife, who grew up in Winona. Their family
mausoleum is on the other side of the 500' hill, which separates us,
plus donating 1 mil to the Rep. Party. <div
id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">
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On 4/24/20, Anand Karve <adkarve@gmail.com> wrote:
I read somewhere that the (red) Indians fertilized corn by burying a small
fish near each corn seedling. A person I know (an Indian Indian) has
instructed his family to bury his body and to plant a tree on top of it.
Yours
A.D.Karve

On Mon 20 Apr, 2020, 6:46 PM Roger Faulkner via groups.io <roger_rethinker=
yahoo.com@groups.io wrote:

in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting
in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I
cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be
with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing
the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would
imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective
agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be
gross
about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a
pH
of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium
hydroxide,
and can rather use tripotassium phosphate.

I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of
hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis
of
the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to
composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure
I
have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the
concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of
biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound
together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic
acid.

I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional
fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar
containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done
with
the proteinaceous portion of my body.

The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is
already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy
than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it
prevents
putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to
the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for
composting.
That appeals to me.

Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body
when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my
method being used.


<https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&;c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>

On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@ilstu.edu> wrote:


Roger,



Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas. Is any
about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?



Paul



Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website: www.drtlud.com

Email: psanders@ilstu.edu Skype: paultlud

Phone: Office: 309-452-7072 Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org
<http://www.juntosnfp.org/>;

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy: See www.woodgas.com

Author of “*A Capitalist Carol*” (free digital copies at
www.capitalism21.org)

with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean
cookstoves.



*From:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *On Behalf Of
*Roger
Faulkner via groups.io
*Sent:* Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
*To:* main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@comcast.net>;
main@biochar.groups.io; claudia.kammann@hs-gm.de
*Subject:* Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and
PyCCS



*[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
abuse@ilstu.edu <abuse@ilstu.edu>] *

I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of
biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent
applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The
most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of
potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent.
This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar
containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a
compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a
mixture
potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.



I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is
desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of.
Tesla
motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the
beginning.
They're probably a lot of other examples as well.



Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by
incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge
opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for
this
application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable
production
to begin on a commercial basis.



I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about
this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they
can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications.



Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you
should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing
change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to
do that is to make money.



Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name
biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of
pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do
with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to
some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per
kilogram
or something like that.



I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger
Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and
polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having
run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green
Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary
election, more than 50,000 votes.



On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

<rongretlarson@comcast.net> wrote:

Professor Kammann and biochar list:



Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic. I’ve dropped
much
of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue -
mostly " PYCCS." I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who
was
the major part of today’s thread comments.



This response is on terminology. Thanks for the three attachments.
I’d
not seen the one by Galinposki.





See below





On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@hs-gm.de>
wrote:



Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:



We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the
two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can
see.

*[RWL1. I like the word “carved”. I’ve previously read and greatly
admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author.. The titles don’t
use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.*





However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building
materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls –
breaking the house down will ultimately result in something that
weathers
again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it
finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal
health).

*[RWL2: Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this
paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);
"**Well,
if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most
marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1
billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land
that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to
up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone
Valley,
but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the
yields of most crops by 30% or so.*

*I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be
broader
than initial placement in soil. I am happy with the idea that a biochar
is
any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say
next.*



For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial
*material* use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as
CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed,
or
materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building
materials.



No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the
strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe,
there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its
use
without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of
Wild-wild-West, in the US?

*[RWL3: I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal”
definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.
But California seems to be getting close. It is worse than being
“wild”.*



Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers.
Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres
that
they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s
a
fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains
intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.)
Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed
here.



*[RWL4: Very interesting; that “fire” protection information is new to
me. *



If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around
negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed
options.
And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we
humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al.
2016”)

*[RWL5. We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being
separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s). Your team
has
done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering
CO2.*

*But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”. Should that be “as
two of”?*

*I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but
I
agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia. I see
that
the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper, they seem to
have done a nice job.*

*I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of
this paper.*



*Claudia: Good to have you commenting here. I understand the
term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”, but I am afraid that the
(commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being
lost
by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”. I don’t know how
to
solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include
the word “biochar” in future papers' titles*





*The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.; hope it wasn’t the list
fault.*



*Ron*







best, Claudia



PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?



*Von:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *Im Auftrag von
*Frank
Strie
*Gesendet:* Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
*An:* main@Biochar.groups.io
*Betreff:* [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our
Team is Growing.





RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

What is the definition of “real Biochar” ?

As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in
fostering / in supporting LIFE.
Biology = Life-Science
Bio = Life (Greek)
Consequently: Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below
ground and in/ under water.
Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well
before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to
manage fire. …
The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very
interesting.
First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and
sediment …
Frankly thinking loud
Frank

*From:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *On Behalf Of*
d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
*Sent:* Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
*To:* main@biochar.groups.io
*Cc:* Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <
CarbonDioxideRemoval@googlegroups.com>; Benoit Lambert <
benoit.lambert@biochargeneration.com>; Thomas Goreau <
goreau@globalcoral.org>
*Subject:* Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is
Growing.



Ron,



Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few
times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am
normally
a pretty good close reader.





<snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>






--
Dick Gallien
22501 East Burns Valley Road
Winona MN 55987
dickgallien@gmail.com [507] 312 0194
www.thefarm.winona-mn.us

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not
possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures,
questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education,
while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the
imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that
there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose
of their confinement, it is too late.


Roger Faulkner
 

This is an epic email train. Because of my AOS it was quite an effort 4B to scroll all the way to the bottom so that I could respond. I think I will ask for Jake to help me to remove some portion of the bottom of this email. In any case have you considered making your farm is there a green burial site for real? I visualized creation of a forest through biochar assisted planting of trees which with each tree being a memorial for a person. There was another poster that wrote to me about her ideas of creating biochar coffins. Some people might prefer a traditional burial in a coffin like that. I think both options should be allowed.

Your farm is not conveniently located for me but perhaps I could take part in the project aimed at doing it there is with everything that is learned from that process being applicable when I try to do it here.


On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 8:58 AM, Dick Gallien
<dickgallien@...> wrote:
Thanks Roger, just 88. Two days ago a woman from town wrote, with many
questions, about being buried here,  A few exchanges and we were
smiling about wanting to be reassured as to our safety with one we
would spend eternity with.  (our politicized microbes might become
combative, if within 6').  With your "green Rep" in mind, told her in
my desperation to
keep this a farm/compost site for Winonans, I called the founder of
Ashley Furniture in Fl.. He's 78 and grew up on a rented farm near
here. I visited with his wife, who grew up in Winona.  Their family
mausoleum is on the other side of the 500' hill, which separates us,
plus donating 1 mil to the Rep. Party.    <div
id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />
<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">
    <tr>
        <td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a
target="_blank"><img
alt="" width="46" height="29" style="width: 46px; height: 29px;"
/></a></td>
        <td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;
font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a
target="_blank" style="color: #4453ea;">www.avast.com</a>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"
height="1"></a></div>

On 4/24/20, Anand Karve <adkarve@...> wrote:
> I read somewhere that the (red) Indians fertilized corn by burying a small
> fish near each corn seedling. A person I know (an Indian Indian) has
> instructed his family to bury his body and to plant a tree on top of it.
> Yours
> A.D.Karve
>
> On Mon 20 Apr, 2020, 6:46 PM Roger Faulkner via groups.io <roger_rethinker=
>
>> in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.
>>
>> I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting
>> in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I
>> cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be
>> with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.
>>
>> The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing
>> the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would
>> imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective
>> agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be
>> gross
>> about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a
>> pH
>> of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium
>> hydroxide,
>> and can rather use tripotassium phosphate.
>>
>> I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of
>> hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis
>> of
>> the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.
>>
>> The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to
>> composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure
>> I
>> have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.
>>
>> The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the
>> concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of
>> biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound
>> together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic
>> acid.
>>
>> I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional
>> fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar
>> containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done
>> with
>> the proteinaceous portion of my body.
>>
>> The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is
>> already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy
>> than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it
>> prevents
>> putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to
>> the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for
>> composting.
>> That appeals to me.
>>
>> Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body
>> when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my
>> method being used.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson
>> <psanders@...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Roger,
>>
>>
>>
>> Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.  Is any
>> about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?
>>
>>
>>
>> Paul
>>
>>
>>
>> Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
>>
>>          Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
>>
>>          Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
>>
>> Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org
>>
>> Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
>>
>> Author of “*A Capitalist Carol*” (free digital copies at
>> www.capitalism21.org)
>>
>>          with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean
>> cookstoves.
>>
>>
>>
>> *Roger
>> Faulkner via groups.io
>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM
>> *Subject:* Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and
>> PyCCS
>>
>>
>>
>> *[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>
>> I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of
>> biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent
>> applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The
>> most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of
>> potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent.
>> This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar
>> containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a
>> compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a
>> mixture
>> potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.
>>
>>
>>
>> I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is
>> desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of.
>> Tesla
>> motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the
>> beginning.
>> They're probably a lot of other examples as well.
>>
>>
>>
>> Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by
>> incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge
>> opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for
>> this
>> application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable
>> production
>> to begin on a commercial basis.
>>
>>
>>
>> I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about
>> this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they
>> can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications.
>>
>>
>>
>> Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you
>> should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing
>> change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to
>> do that is to make money.
>>
>>
>>
>> Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name
>> biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of
>> pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do
>> with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to
>> some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per
>> kilogram
>> or something like that.
>>
>>
>>
>> I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger
>> Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and
>> polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having
>> run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green
>> Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary
>> election, more than 50,000 votes.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson
>>
>> <rongretlarson@...> wrote:
>>
>> Professor Kammann and biochar list:
>>
>>
>>
>> Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped
>> much
>> of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue -
>> mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who
>> was
>> the major part of today’s thread comments.
>>
>>
>>
>> This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.
>> I’d
>> not seen the one by Galinposki.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> See below
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:
>>
>>
>>
>> We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the
>> two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can
>> see.
>>
>> *[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.  I’ve previously read and greatly
>> admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..  The titles don’t
>> use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.*
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building
>> materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls –
>> breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that
>> weathers
>> again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it
>> finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal
>> health).
>>
>> *[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this
>> paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);
>> "**Well,
>> if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most
>> marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1
>> billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land
>> that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to
>> up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone
>> Valley,
>> but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the
>> yields of most crops by 30% or so.*
>>
>> *I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be
>> broader
>> than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar
>> is
>> any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say
>> next.*
>>
>>
>>
>> For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial
>> *material* use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as
>> CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed,
>> or
>> materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building
>> materials.
>>
>>
>>
>> No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the
>> strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe,
>> there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its
>> use
>> without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of
>> Wild-wild-West, in the US?
>>
>> *[RWL3:  I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal”
>> definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.
>> But California seems to be getting close.  It is worse than being
>> “wild”.*
>>
>>
>>
>> Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers.
>> Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres
>> that
>> they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s
>> a
>> fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains
>> intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.)
>> Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed
>> here.
>>
>>
>>
>> *[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to
>> me. *
>>
>>
>>
>> If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around
>> negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed
>> options.
>> And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we
>> humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al.
>> 2016”)
>>
>> *[RWL5.  We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being
>> separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).  Your team
>> has
>> done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering
>> CO2.*
>>
>> *But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as
>> two of”?*
>>
>> *I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but
>> I
>> agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.  I see
>> that
>> the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to
>> have done a nice job.*
>>
>> *I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of
>> this paper.*
>>
>>
>>
>> *Claudia:  Good to have you commenting here.  I understand the
>> term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the
>> (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being
>> lost
>> by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how
>> to
>> solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include
>> the word “biochar” in future papers' titles*
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list
>> fault.*
>>
>>
>>
>> *Ron*
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> best, Claudia
>>
>>
>>
>> PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?
>>
>>
>>
>> *Frank
>> Strie
>> *Gesendet:* Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53
>> *Betreff:* [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our
>> Team is Growing.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)
>>
>> What is the definition of  “real Biochar” ?
>>
>> As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in
>> fostering / in supporting LIFE.
>> Biology = Life-Science
>> Bio = Life (Greek)
>> Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below
>> ground and in/ under water.
>> Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well
>> before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to
>> manage fire.  …
>> The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very
>> interesting.
>> First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and
>> sediment …
>> Frankly thinking loud
>> Frank
>>
>> *Sent:* Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM
>> *Cc:* Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <
>> CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <
>> benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <
>> *Subject:* Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is
>> Growing.
>>
>>
>>
>> Ron,
>>
>>
>>
>> Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few
>> times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am
>> normally
>> a pretty good close reader.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> <snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>


--
Dick Gallien
22501 East Burns Valley Road
Winona  MN  55987
dickgallien@...  [507] 312 0194
www.thefarm.winona-mn.us

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not
possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures,
questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education,
while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the
imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that
there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose
of their confinement, it is too late.



Paul S Anderson
 

Options for end of life include:

A.  Standard burial (embalming, etc.)

B.  Cremation  (burn to ash)

 

We are discussing   C.  Composting (decay)

 

What about D?   D.  Pyrolysis (convert to biochar, plus the bones to be bone-char of pulverized).

 

I have assessed this in past years.   Issues are the water content, fat rendering, and carbonization of the remaining solids (bones are separate issue).  

 

Contact me OFF – LIST if seriously interested.   But otherwise, I think this is off-topic for the Biochar Discussion Group.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 24, 2020 8:31 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Dick Gallien <dickgallien@...>; main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Jake Wenzel <jake.rethinker@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

This is an epic email train. Because of my AOS it was quite an effort 4B to scroll all the way to the bottom so that I could respond. I think I will ask for Jake to help me to remove some portion of the bottom of this email. In any case have you considered making your farm is there a green burial site for real? I visualized creation of a forest through biochar assisted planting of trees which with each tree being a memorial for a person. There was another poster that wrote to me about her ideas of creating biochar coffins. Some people might prefer a traditional burial in a coffin like that. I think both options should be allowed.

 

Your farm is not conveniently located for me but perhaps I could take part in the project aimed at doing it there is with everything that is learned from that process being applicable when I try to do it here.

 

On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 8:58 AM, Dick Gallien

<dickgallien@...> wrote:

Thanks Roger, just 88. Two days ago a woman from town wrote, with many

questions, about being buried here,  A few exchanges and we were

smiling about wanting to be reassured as to our safety with one we

would spend eternity with.  (our politicized microbes might become

combative, if within 6').  With your "green Rep" in mind, told her in

my desperation to

keep this a farm/compost site for Winonans, I called the founder of

Ashley Furniture in Fl.. He's 78 and grew up on a rented farm near

here. I visited with his wife, who grew up in Winona.  Their family

mausoleum is on the other side of the 500' hill, which separates us,

plus donating 1 mil to the Rep. Party.    <div

id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />

<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">

    <tr>

        <td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a

target="_blank"><img

alt="" width="46" height="29" style="width: 46px; height: 29px;"

/></a></td>

        <td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;

font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;

line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a

target="_blank" style="color: #4453ea;">www.avast.com</a>

        </td>

    </tr>

</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"

height="1"></a></div>

 

On 4/24/20, Anand Karve <adkarve@...> wrote:

> I read somewhere that the (red) Indians fertilized corn by burying a small

> fish near each corn seedling. A person I know (an Indian Indian) has

> instructed his family to bury his body and to plant a tree on top of it.

> Yours

> A.D.Karve

> On Mon 20 Apr, 2020, 6:46 PM Roger Faulkner via groups.io <roger_rethinker=

>> in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

>> 

>> I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting

>> in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I

>> cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be

>> with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

>> 

>> The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing

>> the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would

>> imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective

>> agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be

>> gross

>> about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a

>> pH

>> of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium

>> hydroxide,

>> and can rather use tripotassium phosphate.

>> 

>> I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of

>> hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis

>> of

>> the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

>> 

>> The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to

>> composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure

>> I

>> have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

>> 

>> The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the

>> concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of

>> biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound

>> together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic

>> acid.

>> 

>> I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional

>> fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar

>> containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done

>> with

>> the proteinaceous portion of my body.

>> 

>> The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is

>> already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy

>> than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it

>> prevents

>> putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to

>> the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for

>> composting.

>> That appeals to me.

>> 

>> Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body

>> when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my

>> method being used.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson

>> <psanders@...> wrote:

>> 

>> 

>> Roger,

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.  Is any

>> about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Paul

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com

>> 

>>          Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud

>> 

>>          Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

>> 

>> Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org

>> 

>> Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

>> 

>> Author of “*A Capitalist Carol*” (free digital copies at

>> 

>>          with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean

>> cookstoves.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *From:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *On Behalf Of

>> *Roger

>> Faulkner via groups.io

>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM

>> *To:* main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>;

>> *Subject:* Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and

>> PyCCS

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to

>> 

>> I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of

>> biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent

>> applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The

>> most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of

>> potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent.

>> This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar

>> containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a

>> compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a

>> mixture

>> potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is

>> desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of.

>> Tesla

>> motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the

>> beginning.

>> They're probably a lot of other examples as well.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by

>> incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge

>> opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for

>> this

>> application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable

>> production

>> to begin on a commercial basis.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about

>> this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they

>> can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you

>> should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing

>> change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to

>> do that is to make money.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name

>> biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of

>> pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do

>> with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to

>> some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per

>> kilogram

>> or something like that.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger

>> Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and

>> polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having

>> run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green

>> Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary

>> election, more than 50,000 votes.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

>> 

>> <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

>> 

>> Professor Kammann and biochar list:

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped

>> much

>> of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue -

>> mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who

>> was

>> the major part of today’s thread comments.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.

>> I’d

>> not seen the one by Galinposki.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> See below

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...>

>> wrote:

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the

>> two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can

>> see.

>> 

>> *[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.  I’ve previously read and greatly

>> admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..  The titles don’t

>> use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building

>> materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls –

>> breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that

>> weathers

>> again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it

>> finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal

>> health).

>> 

>> *[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this

>> paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);

>> "**Well,

>> if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most

>> marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1

>> billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land

>> that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to

>> up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone

>> Valley,

>> but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the

>> yields of most crops by 30% or so.*

>> 

>> *I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be

>> broader

>> than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar

>> is

>> any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say

>> next.*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial

>> *material* use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as

>> CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed,

>> or

>> materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building

>> materials.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the

>> strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe,

>> there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its

>> use

>> without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of

>> Wild-wild-West, in the US?

>> 

>> *[RWL3:  I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal”

>> definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.

>> But California seems to be getting close.  It is worse than being

>> “wild”.*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers.

>> Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres

>> that

>> they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s

>> a

>> fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains

>> intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.)

>> Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed

>> here.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to

>> me. *

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around

>> negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed

>> options.

>> And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we

>> humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al.

>> 2016”)

>> 

>> *[RWL5.  We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being

>> separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).  Your team

>> has

>> done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering

>> CO2.*

>> 

>> *But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as

>> two of”?*

>> 

>> *I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but

>> I

>> agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.  I see

>> that

>> the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to

>> have done a nice job.*

>> 

>> *I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of

>> this paper.*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *Claudia:  Good to have you commenting here.  I understand the

>> term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the

>> (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being

>> lost

>> by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how

>> to

>> solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include

>> the word “biochar” in future papers' titles*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list

>> fault.*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *Ron*

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> best, Claudia

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> *Von:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *Im Auftrag von

>> *Frank

>> Strie

>> *Gesendet:* Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53

>> *Betreff:* [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our

>> Team is Growing.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

>> 

>> What is the definition of  “real Biochar” ?

>> 

>> As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in

>> fostering / in supporting LIFE.

>> Biology = Life-Science

>> Bio = Life (Greek)

>> Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below

>> ground and in/ under water.

>> Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well

>> before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to

>> manage fire.  …

>> The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very

>> interesting.

>> First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and

>> sediment …

>> Frankly thinking loud

>> Frank

>> 

>> *From:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *On Behalf Of*

>> *Sent:* Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM

>> *Cc:* Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <

>> CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <

>> benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <

>> *Subject:* Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is

>> Growing.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Ron,

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few

>> times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am

>> normally

>> a pretty good close reader.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> <snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>

 

 

--

Dick Gallien

22501 East Burns Valley Road

Winona  MN  55987

dickgallien@...  [507] 312 0194

 

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not

possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures,

questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education,

while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the

imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that

there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose

of their confinement, it is too late.

 

 


Roger Faulkner
 

Okay and as suggested, this will be my last post on biochar list for this subject. However I am dead serious about participating with others to revolutionize the funeral industry in America. Write to me off list about that. 

However let me see that my vision is to create a multi-functional site which does involve green burials where multiple different techniques would be legal, and perhaps a research institute developing more environmentally sound means of dealing with human remains. The site would also be a place for reforestation, a nature preserve, and a bird sanctuary.

I had not thought about direct charring of the body until several commenters on here brought that to my attention. It sounds like a wholesome way to go. It does prevent the separation of the bones from the rest of the body, which could be seen as either a good thing or a negative thing. depends on whether you want to hold on to the bones as a memento.

Respond to me individually if you wish to pursue this as a business idea. I have filed three relevant patents on the use of some of these ideas I have discussed here.


On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 11:47 AM, Paul S Anderson
<psanders@...> wrote:

Options for end of life include:

A.  Standard burial (embalming, etc.)

B.  Cremation  (burn to ash)

 

We are discussing   C.  Composting (decay)

 

What about D?   D.  Pyrolysis (convert to biochar, plus the bones to be bone-char of pulverized).

 

I have assessed this in past years.   Issues are the water content, fat rendering, and carbonization of the remaining solids (bones are separate issue).  

 

Contact me OFF – LIST if seriously interested.   But otherwise, I think this is off-topic for the Biochar Discussion Group.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Faulkner via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 24, 2020 8:31 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io; Dick Gallien <dickgallien@...>; main@biochar.groups.io
Cc: Jake Wenzel <jake.rethinker@...>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Biochar material use in human remains composting

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

This is an epic email train. Because of my AOS it was quite an effort 4B to scroll all the way to the bottom so that I could respond. I think I will ask for Jake to help me to remove some portion of the bottom of this email. In any case have you considered making your farm is there a green burial site for real? I visualized creation of a forest through biochar assisted planting of trees which with each tree being a memorial for a person. There was another poster that wrote to me about her ideas of creating biochar coffins. Some people might prefer a traditional burial in a coffin like that. I think both options should be allowed.

 

Your farm is not conveniently located for me but perhaps I could take part in the project aimed at doing it there is with everything that is learned from that process being applicable when I try to do it here.

 

On Fri, Apr 24, 2020 at 8:58 AM, Dick Gallien

<dickgallien@...> wrote:

Thanks Roger, just 88. Two days ago a woman from town wrote, with many

questions, about being buried here,  A few exchanges and we were

smiling about wanting to be reassured as to our safety with one we

would spend eternity with.  (our politicized microbes might become

combative, if within 6').  With your "green Rep" in mind, told her in

my desperation to

keep this a farm/compost site for Winonans, I called the founder of

Ashley Furniture in Fl.. He's 78 and grew up on a rented farm near

here. I visited with his wife, who grew up in Winona.  Their family

mausoleum is on the other side of the 500' hill, which separates us,

plus donating 1 mil to the Rep. Party.    <div

id="DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2"><br />

<table style="border-top: 1px solid #D3D4DE;">

    <tr>

        <td style="width: 55px; padding-top: 13px;"><a

target="_blank"><img

alt="" width="46" height="29" style="width: 46px; height: 29px;"

/></a></td>

        <td style="width: 470px; padding-top: 12px; color: #41424e;

font-size: 13px; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;

line-height: 18px;">Virus-free. <a

target="_blank" style="color: #4453ea;">www.avast.com</a>

        </td>

    </tr>

</table><a href="#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2" width="1"

height="1"></a></div>

 

On 4/24/20, Anand Karve <adkarve@...> wrote:

> I read somewhere that the (red) Indians fertilized corn by burying a small

> fish near each corn seedling. A person I know (an Indian Indian) has

> instructed his family to bury his body and to plant a tree on top of it.

> Yours

> A.D.Karve

>  

> On Mon 20 Apr, 2020, 6:46 PM Roger Faulkner via groups.io <roger_rethinker=

>  

>> in response do the questions below I have created a new thread.

>>  

>> I mentioned my ideas which relate to biochar and human remains composting

>> in at least two articles I wrote for medium.com. Because of my ALS, I

>> cannot attach documents to an email by myself. My assistant Jake will be

>> with me starting at 11 today and at that time I can provide some links.

>>  

>> The first of the 3 patent applications dealt with the idea of hydrolyzing

>> the body under milder conditions than what it is used today. That would

>> imply a longer time for hydrolysis unless there is more effective

>> agitation, which is actually part of my thoughts. I don't mean to be

>> gross

>> about it but I went into full detail. Since the final hydrolysate has a

>> pH

>> of about 10, one really doesn't need to use potassium or sodium

>> hydroxide,

>> and can rather use tripotassium phosphate.

>>  

>> I would like to see my bones preserved. The conventional method of

>> hydrolysis is so aggressive that the bones crumble due to the hydrolysis

>> of

>> the protein between the calcium apatite crystals of the bone.

>>  

>> The next patent refines the method by instead of going straight to

>> composting having the hydrolysate absorbed into biochar. I'm pretty sure

>> I

>> have a medium.com article about both of these ideas.

>>  

>> The third major idea covered in by in my provisional patents is the

>> concept of creating a fertilizer pellet which is mainly comprised of

>> biochar particles with a desirable cation profile, which are then bound

>> together by a mixture of potassium humate and the ammonium salt of ulmic

>> acid.

>>  

>> I visualize a pellet of fertilizer that can go through conventional

>> fertilizer spreaders. of course this can be done with the the biochar

>> containing hydrolyzed human remains. In fact, that's what I want done

>> with

>> the proteinaceous portion of my body.

>>  

>> The funeral industry is ready for major changes. Alkaline hydrolysis is

>> already legal in more than 50% of states in America. It uses less energy

>> than any other approved method. And what appeals to me is that it

>> prevents

>> putrification, and it preserves the body's Amino and nucleic acids up to

>> the point that they go into the soil or into a compost pile for

>> composting.

>> That appeals to me.

>>  

>> Because of my ALS I've been thinking a lot about what to do with my body

>> when I die. I would very much like to be the very first example of my

>> method being used.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 9:38 AM, Paul S Anderson

>> <psanders@...> wrote:

>>  

>>  

>> Roger,

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Please provide a link or sources about all three of your ideas.  Is any

>> about carbonization (pyrolysis) of the body?

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Paul

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com

>>  

>>          Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud

>>  

>>          Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

>>  

>> Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org

>>  

>> Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

>>  

>> Author of “*A Capitalist Carol*” (free digital copies at

>>  

>>          with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean

>> cookstoves.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *From:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *On Behalf Of

>> *Roger

>> Faulkner via groups.io

>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 19, 2020 7:27 AM

>> *To:* main@Biochar.groups.io; Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...>;

>> *Subject:* Re: [Biochar] Negative Emissions, Biochar material use and

>> PyCCS

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to

>>  

>> I really enjoyed reading this. I have a contribution here, the use of

>> biochar in human remains dispersal. I have actually filed three patent

>> applications covering ways of dealing with a human body after death. The

>> most favorable method uses alkaline hydrolysis with a combination of

>> potassium hydroxide and tripotassium phosphate as the hydrolyzing agent.

>> This liquid can be absorbed onto biochar. The particulate biochar

>> containing the hydrolyzed human remains can either go from there into a

>> compost pile or can be dried. It can also be pelletized by using a

>> mixture

>> potassium and ammonium salts of humic and ulmic acid.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> I think it is often the case that getting a new industry started it is

>> desirable to start at the highest value application you can think of.

>> Tesla

>> motors went after the top of the line sports car right from the

>> beginning.

>> They're probably a lot of other examples as well.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Biochar used to help grieving people honor their loved ones by

>> incorporating their remains into plantings which they select is a huge

>> opening for getting biochar into the minds of the public. Biochar for

>> this

>> application could also fetch a realistic price that would enable

>> production

>> to begin on a commercial basis.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> I have filed those patent applications to enable me to speak freely about

>> this. The clock is running; now that I have fully revealed my ideas they

>> can only be patented by me because I have pending patent applications.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Before you think me a commercial sell out or something like that you

>> should know that I have ALS and then I have devoted my life to causing

>> change in the world. As I age it has become clear that the fastest way to

>> do that is to make money.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Also mentioned in this train below are various ideas about how to name

>> biochar. I think the definition biochar as opposed to other types of

>> pyrolytic carbon which all are useful in carbon sequestration has to do

>> with the cation exchange capacity. I think it will have to come down to

>> some specific criteria. It will probably be expressed in moles per

>> kilogram

>> or something like that.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> I have commented a few times but allow me to introduce myself. I am Roger

>> Faulkner, primarily I'm an inventor but I'm also a chemical engineer and

>> polymer scientist. I have also been a political activist including having

>> run for the US Senate in Wisconsin in 1992 calling myself a green

>> Republican. I got 20% of the vote in the statewide Republican primary

>> election, more than 50,000 votes.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> On Fri, Apr 17, 2020 at 7:44 PM, Ron Larson

>>  

>> <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

>>  

>> Professor Kammann and biochar list:

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Glad to see this new shorter thread on a limited topic.  I’ve dropped

>> much

>> of your older material, which was on Project Drawdown not this issue -

>> mostly " PYCCS."  I earlier responded separately to Michael Shafer, who

>> was

>> the major part of today’s thread comments.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> This response is on terminology.  Thanks for the three attachments.

>> I’d

>> not seen the one by Galinposki.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> See below

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> On Apr 17, 2020, at 6:27 AM, Caludia Kammann <claudia.kammann@...>

>> wrote:

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Re the “Biochar material use” discussion:

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> We carved the term PyCCS for Pyrogenic Carbon Capture and Storage via the

>> two attached papers which does not contain the word “Biochar”, as you can

>> see.

>>  

>> *[RWL1.  I like the word “carved”.  I’ve previously read and greatly

>> admired the two on PYCCS - where you are a co-author..  The titles don’t

>> use the word “biochar”, but the papers do.*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> However, Frank mentions cascading uses and that is where building

>> materials meet biochar: if you use a clay loam plaster on your walls –

>> breaking the house down will ultimately result in  something that

>> weathers

>> again to be, in the end, soil. Also, if you use it as a feed additive, it

>> finally ends up in the soil, but has a different purpose first (animal

>> health).

>>  

>> *[RWL2:    Frank (see also his comment below) was responding to this

>> paragraph in Michael’s message of also today (emphasis added);

>> "**Well,

>> if we make the crude assumption that the smallest farms are the most

>> marginal and on the worst land, then we are talking about dividing our 1

>> billion tonnes of real biochar (biochar buried in the ground) to the land

>> that these farms are on. The result is not the golden 1 kg/m2 required to

>> up the performance of the pampered soils of New York and the Rhone

>> Valley,

>> but in Asia and Africa, as little 125 or 250 g/ m2 ought to boost the

>> yields of most crops by 30% or so.*

>>  

>> *I think I agree with you (Claudia) that the word “biochar” can be

>> broader

>> than initial placement in soil.  I am happy with the idea that a biochar

>> is

>> any charcoal that is not combusted - whichI believe is what you say

>> next.*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> For me, biochar was and is largely a term that depicts a beneficial

>> *material* use, not the use that involves burning it and returning it as

>> CO2 to the atmosphere (as in “charcoal”), be it in soil, in animal feed,

>> or

>> materials such as paper (that may be composted in the end) or building

>> materials.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> No one would just use biochar as a sand replacement without testing the

>> strength and resistance of the resulting material. At least in Europe,

>> there are strict regulations and norms that would never, ever allow its

>> use

>> without sufficient R&D first. Maybe this is different, a kind of

>> Wild-wild-West, in the US?

>>  

>> *[RWL3:  I believe it true that the US still doesn’t have the “legal”

>> definitions that are the arrangement in at least parts of Europe.

>> But California seems to be getting close.  It is worse than being

>> “wild”.*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Hans-Peter Schmidt has done some work on this, together with engineers.

>> Biochar in tunnel concrete worked well as a replacement of the fibres

>> that

>> they have to put in it as fire protection (fibres that melt when there’s

>> a

>> fire, so that water vapour can escape and the carrying structure remains

>> intact & is not blasted appart. Biochar replaced the fibres very well.)

>> Plus, biochar is alkaline, not acidic.... Clearly, more R&D is needed

>> here.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *[RWL4:  Very interesting;  that “fire” protection information is new to

>> me. *

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> If we truly want to go for the 2° goal of Paris, there is no way around

>> negative emissions, with biochar /PyCCS as one of the many needed

>> options.

>> And as for the next ice age? Screw that, not going to happen, anyway, we

>> humans made sure of that already. (See attached paper “Ganopolsik et al.

>> 2016”)

>>  

>> *[RWL5.  We should also note the way you use “biochar/PYCCS” as being

>> separate - I believe not two terms for the same product(s).  Your team

>> has

>> done a nice job of sequestering pyrolysis products, NOT sequestering

>> CO2.*

>>  

>> *But I may be misinterpreting as you add "as one of”.  Should that be “as

>> two of”?*

>>  

>> *I can’t find that the past thread has talked about “next ice age” - but

>> I

>> agree with you on having put that off for probably millennia.  I see

>> that

>> the “ice age" term is the subject of the Ganopolski paper,  they seem to

>> have done a nice job.*

>>  

>> *I don’t think this is the right list to get into arguing the truth of

>> this paper.*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *Claudia:  Good to have you commenting here.  I understand the

>> term “PYCCS” as being different from “biochar”,  but I am afraid that the

>> (commendably) large sequestration values in your two papers are being

>> lost

>> by CDR writers, because they aren’t labeled “biochar”.  I don’t know how

>> to

>> solve that problem - except to hope you can find a way to somehow include

>> the word “biochar” in future papers' titles*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *The “Caludia” problem should have been fixed.;  hope it wasn’t the list

>> fault.*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *Ron*

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> best, Claudia

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> PS: Can someone probably correct my first name in the data base....?

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> *Von:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *Im Auftrag von

>> *Frank

>> Strie

>> *Gesendet:* Freitag, 17. April 2020 13:53

>> *Betreff:* [EXTERN] Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our

>> Team is Growing.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> RE: “real biochar (biochar buried in the ground)

>>  

>> What is the definition of  “real Biochar” ?

>>  

>> As I see it, Biochar is pyrogenic, stable black carbon that is useful in

>> fostering / in supporting LIFE.

>> Biology = Life-Science

>> Bio = Life (Greek)

>> Consequently:  Biochar supports, fosters, enables Life above and below

>> ground and in/ under water.

>> Pyrogenic Carbon / Biochar has supported, fostered and enabled life well

>> before humans walked the Earth and / or well before humans learned how to

>> manage fire.  …

>> The cascading values and uses of Biochar is where things get very

>> interesting.

>> First capturing nutrients and then becoming useful in the soil and

>> sediment …

>> Frankly thinking loud

>> Frank

>>  

>> *From:* main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> *On Behalf Of*

>> *Sent:* Friday, April 17, 2020 6:39 PM

>> *Cc:* Biochar@groups.io; Carbon Dioxide Removal <

>> CarbonDioxideRemoval@...>; Benoit Lambert <

>> benoit.lambert@...>; Thomas Goreau <

>> *Subject:* Re: [Biochar] The Drawdown Review, New Website, Our Team is

>> Growing.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Ron,

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> Your capacity for detail is just remarkable. It took me more than a few

>> times through this to make all the pieces fall into place and i am

>> normally

>> a pretty good close reader.

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>> <snip - the rest on a different topic - responded to already>

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>>  

>  

>

>  

>  

 

 

--

Dick Gallien

22501 East Burns Valley Road

Winona  MN  55987

dickgallien@...  [507] 312 0194

 

Prison bars do the confining, allowing the prisoner a mental freedom not

possible in schools, where an endless barrage of assignments, lectures,

questions and tests, serve the same purpose, under the guise of education,

while distracting as efficiently as the cracking of whips, keeping the

imprisoned from discovering and pursuing their passions, or noticing that

there are no real bars------and by the time they might realize the purpose

of their confinement, it is too late.