Topics

Non-soil biochar #nonsoil


Ron Larson
 

List.  and cc to the corresponding author (with thanks for a lot of work)

1.  I have just finished skimming through this (non-fee) paper:   A Review of Non-Soil Biochar Applications
 Mattia Bartoli 1 , Mauro Giorcelli 1 , Pravin Jagdale 2 , Massimo Rovere 1 and Alberto Tagliaferro 1,3,* 

Here is the (emphases added) abstract:

 Abstract: Biochar is the solid residue that is recovered after the thermal cracking of biomasses in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Biochar has been used for many years as a soil amendment and in general soil applications. Nonetheless, biochar is far more than a mere soil amendment. In this review, we report all the non-soil applications of biochar including environmental remediation, energy storage, composites, and catalyst production. We provide a general overview of the recent uses of biochar in material science, thus presenting this cheap and waste-derived material as a high value-added and carbonaceous source. Keywords: biochar; environmental remediation; energy storage; composites; carbon.

I have emphasized the word “all” - wondering if anyone can spot a biochar topic not covered;  I can’t.  Certainly quite a few that were brand new to me.  It is amazing to see the word “cheap”.

2.   There are 352 articles cited. (This might a biochar paper world record number?)  Listing them takes up about half of the 35 pages - so obviously not much on any one paper.  There are 7 figures;  this is the one I found must unusual.  Unfortunately Cite # 144 ( by Dai) is behind a pay wall.   I like this new-to-me connection between biochar and an 8-part light bulb.


4.  Here is the similarly enthusiastic concluding paragraph (emphases added again):

 "Conclusions In this review, we have presented an updated overview of non-soil applications of biochar with a focus on more useful and unusual ones. We reported many studies on the adsorbitive capacity of ions and organic molecules, together with their biochar electrochemical properties. These properties are particularly relevant in the future perspective of clean energy production and storage. We also described, in detail, the possibility of using biochars as sound replacements for traditional fillers in both inorganic and organic composites materials. This evidence has shown the feasibility of the biochars used in a lot of sectors as solid alternatives to traditional and next-generation materials. The polyhedral nature of biochar represents a very strong advantage for spread the biochar use across material science field. We hope that this summary of recent literature can lead to the foundation of new research which will exploit the great potential of biochar and biochar based materials.”

I can’t now recall how this came to my attention - but thanks to someone.

Ron



Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...>
 

List, Ron, 

I might be the one that brought it to your attention Ron. I enjoyed this article very much. I often refer to it. I have been in contact with Mauro before the article was published early 2020. An impressive number of scientific references, 352 for 17 pages article. 

I am involved with IPCC WG1 reviewing the coming Sixth Assessment Report (AR6). I will suggest they put this article as a reference on biochar. Biochar is not just about soils. Bio-sourced material might very well play a major role for a biogeotherapy.  

Best, Benoit

Le 12 mai 2020 à 17:47, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> a écrit :

List.  and cc to the corresponding author (with thanks for a lot of work)

1.  I have just finished skimming through this (non-fee) paper:   A Review of Non-Soil Biochar Applications
 Mattia Bartoli 1 , Mauro Giorcelli 1 , Pravin Jagdale 2 , Massimo Rovere 1 and Alberto Tagliaferro 1,3,* 

Here is the (emphases added) abstract:

 Abstract: Biochar is the solid residue that is recovered after the thermal cracking of biomasses in an oxygen-free atmosphere. Biochar has been used for many years as a soil amendment and in general soil applications. Nonetheless, biochar is far more than a mere soil amendment. In this review, we report all the non-soil applications of biochar including environmental remediation, energy storage, composites, and catalyst production. We provide a general overview of the recent uses of biochar in material science, thus presenting this cheap and waste-derived material as a high value-added and carbonaceous source. Keywords: biochar; environmental remediation; energy storage; composites; carbon.

I have emphasized the word “all” - wondering if anyone can spot a biochar topic not covered;  I can’t.  Certainly quite a few that were brand new to me.  It is amazing to see the word “cheap”.

2.   There are 352 articles cited. (This might a biochar paper world record number?)  Listing them takes up about half of the 35 pages - so obviously not much on any one paper.  There are 7 figures;  this is the one I found must unusual.  Unfortunately Cite # 144 ( by Dai) is behind a pay wall.   I like this new-to-me connection between biochar and an 8-part light bulb.

<Screen Shot 2020-05-12 at 2.59.03 PM.png>

4.  Here is the similarly enthusiastic concluding paragraph (emphases added again):

 "Conclusions In this review, we have presented an updated overview of non-soil applications of biochar with a focus on more useful and unusual ones. We reported many studies on the adsorbitive capacity of ions and organic molecules, together with their biochar electrochemical properties. These properties are particularly relevant in the future perspective of clean energy production and storage. We also described, in detail, the possibility of using biochars as sound replacements for traditional fillers in both inorganic and organic composites materials. This evidence has shown the feasibility of the biochars used in a lot of sectors as solid alternatives to traditional and next-generation materials. The polyhedral nature of biochar represents a very strong advantage for spread the biochar use across material science field. We hope that this summary of recent literature can lead to the foundation of new research which will exploit the great potential of biochar and biochar based materials.”

I can’t now recall how this came to my attention - but thanks to someone.

Ron