CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery


Paul S Anderson
 

Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...>
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.

 

Hugh McLaughlin

 

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Paul

My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  

 

Cheers

David Derbowka

 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 

eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |

Image removed by sender.

 

 

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals).

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.Image removed by sender.

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

Image removed by sender. r2d2


Gordon West
 

Hi all,

It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.

Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:



Gordon West
The Trollworks
503 N. “E” Street
Silver City, NM 88061
575-537-3689

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller







On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.
 
Hugh McLaughlin
 
On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Paul
My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  
 
Cheers
David Derbowka
 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |
<~WRD0000.jpg>
 
 
On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

<image002.jpg>



Tom Miles
 

Gordon,

 

Thanks for sharing the proposal. That s quite a project. What is your projected heat and material balance for the units? How much fuel will you consume and how much heat and biochar will be produces for the 40 and 90 MBtuh units? What are the projected costs?

 

Thanks

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi all,

 

It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.

 

Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:

 

 

 

Gordon West

The Trollworks

503 N. “E” Street

Silver City, NM 88061

575-537-3689

 

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller

 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

 

Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.

 

Hugh McLaughlin

 

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Paul

My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  

 

Cheers

David Derbowka

 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 

eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |

<~WRD0000.jpg>

 

 

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

<image002.jpg>

 


Gordon West
 

Tom,

The unit is a continuous feed TLUD that can modulate its output from approximately 40K to 90K Btu by controlling the primary air flow, which regulates the feedstock flow. The throughput of biomass is calculated on 5K Btu per pound, so 18# per hour at a 90K Btu burn rate. The conversion efficiency to biochar is about 30%. 

I just got some quotes from sheet metal fabrication companies on supplying the pyrolysis reactor bodies, instead of us making them as one-offs with lots of hand forming and cutting and welding, and the cost per unit looks like it could reduce from $30K to $12K per unit in stainless steel, using off-the-shelf cast iron boiler components for the burn chamber/heat exchangers. That includes PLC controls and remote system monitoring and operation. We are still seeking investors so we can hit the manufacturing price breaks quickly. It’s a bit of a chicken and egg situation during the early commercialization phase with getting something in production so that investors will feel comfortable committing, but I think we are almost there. 

Gordon 






On Jul 3, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Gordon, 
 
Thanks for sharing the proposal. That s quite a project. What is your projected heat and material balance for the units? How much fuel will you consume and how much heat and biochar will be produces for the 40 and 90 MBtuh units? What are the projected costs? 
 
Thanks
 
Tom
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
Hi all,
 
It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.
 
Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:
 
 
 
Gordon West
The Trollworks
503 N. “E” Street
Silver City, NM 88061
575-537-3689
 
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller
 
 
 
 

 



On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:
 
Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.
 
Hugh McLaughlin
 
On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Paul
My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  
 
Cheers
David Derbowka
 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner
Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |
<~WRD0000.jpg>
 
 
On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

<image002.jpg>

 



Tom Miles
 

Gordon,

 

Thanks. We usually see about 22% of the dry weight as char in a gasifier. That would yield about 4 lb of biochar which would contain about 48,000 Btu (4 lb x 12,000 Btu/lb) of the input fuel energy. That leaves you 42,000 Btu (90,000-48,000 Btu) less losses for heating or 2,300 Btu/lb fuel input and 0.22 lb biochar/lb fuel input.  I need 120,000 Btuh to heat my home office. If I use my 90,000 Btuh heat pump your 40,000 could keep the hydronic system worm on cold nights. Will you be making higher capacity versions?

 

Tom  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 4:49 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Tom,

 

The unit is a continuous feed TLUD that can modulate its output from approximately 40K to 90K Btu by controlling the primary air flow, which regulates the feedstock flow. The throughput of biomass is calculated on 5K Btu per pound, so 18# per hour at a 90K Btu burn rate. The conversion efficiency to biochar is about 30%. 

 

I just got some quotes from sheet metal fabrication companies on supplying the pyrolysis reactor bodies, instead of us making them as one-offs with lots of hand forming and cutting and welding, and the cost per unit looks like it could reduce from $30K to $12K per unit in stainless steel, using off-the-shelf cast iron boiler components for the burn chamber/heat exchangers. That includes PLC controls and remote system monitoring and operation. We are still seeking investors so we can hit the manufacturing price breaks quickly. It’s a bit of a chicken and egg situation during the early commercialization phase with getting something in production so that investors will feel comfortable committing, but I think we are almost there. 

 

Gordon 

 

 

 

 



On Jul 3, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

 

Gordon, 

 

Thanks for sharing the proposal. That s quite a project. What is your projected heat and material balance for the units? How much fuel will you consume and how much heat and biochar will be produces for the 40 and 90 MBtuh units? What are the projected costs? 

 

Thanks

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi all,

 

It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.

 

Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:

 

 

 

Gordon West

The Trollworks

503 N. “E” Street

Silver City, NM 88061

575-537-3689

 

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller

 

 

 

 

 




On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

 

Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.

 

Hugh McLaughlin

 

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Paul

My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  

 

Cheers

David Derbowka

 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 

eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |

<~WRD0000.jpg>

 

 

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

<image002.jpg>

 

 


Gordon West
 

Tom,

We can make any capacity needed. The area of the pyrolysis front and the primary air input are easy to manipulate in our system. This particular configuration has a 12” diameter pyrolysis front area and the feed rate has been measured at .67 feet per hour.

How big is your home office? My big old 1912 Sears Craftsman kit house only needs 45,000 Btu calculated peak load! 🧐

Here was my calculation: 18# biomass x 8600Btu/lb = 154,800 Btu/hr. 30% biochar yield = 46,440 Btu in the char, 108,360 in the syngas. The boiler heat exchanger is rated at 85% efficiency = 92,106 Btu output. 

I confess to often not doing the math right - please analyze and comment.

Gordon 





On Jul 3, 2020, at 6:30 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Gordon,
 
Thanks. We usually see about 22% of the dry weight as char in a gasifier. That would yield about 4 lb of biochar which would contain about 48,000 Btu (4 lb x 12,000 Btu/lb) of the input fuel energy. That leaves you 42,000 Btu (90,000-48,000 Btu) less losses for heating or 2,300 Btu/lb fuel input and 0.22 lb biochar/lb fuel input.  I need 120,000 Btuh to heat my home office. If I use my 90,000 Btuh heat pump your 40,000 could keep the hydronic system worm on cold nights. Will you be making higher capacity versions? 
 
Tom  
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 4:49 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
Tom,
 
The unit is a continuous feed TLUD that can modulate its output from approximately 40K to 90K Btu by controlling the primary air flow, which regulates the feedstock flow. The throughput of biomass is calculated on 5K Btu per pound, so 18# per hour at a 90K Btu burn rate. The conversion efficiency to biochar is about 30%. 
 
I just got some quotes from sheet metal fabrication companies on supplying the pyrolysis reactor bodies, instead of us making them as one-offs with lots of hand forming and cutting and welding, and the cost per unit looks like it could reduce from $30K to $12K per unit in stainless steel, using off-the-shelf cast iron boiler components for the burn chamber/heat exchangers. That includes PLC controls and remote system monitoring and operation. We are still seeking investors so we can hit the manufacturing price breaks quickly. It’s a bit of a chicken and egg situation during the early commercialization phase with getting something in production so that investors will feel comfortable committing, but I think we are almost there. 
 
Gordon 
 
 
 

 



On Jul 3, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:
 
Gordon, 
 
Thanks for sharing the proposal. That s quite a project. What is your projected heat and material balance for the units? How much fuel will you consume and how much heat and biochar will be produces for the 40 and 90 MBtuh units? What are the projected costs? 
 
Thanks
 
Tom
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
Hi all,
 
It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.
 
Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:
 
 
 
Gordon West
The Trollworks
503 N. “E” Street
Silver City, NM 88061
575-537-3689
 
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller
 
 
 
 

 




On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:
 
Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.
 
Hugh McLaughlin
 
On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Paul
My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  
 
Cheers
David Derbowka
 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner
Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |
<~WRD0000.jpg>
 
 
On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

<image002.jpg>

 
 



Tom Miles
 

Gordon,

 

Your earlier note assumed 5k Btu/lb from the fuel. At 8,600 Btu/lb you have more energy to work with.

 

My home + house has a 120K load in winter when the sun is not shining. Not the most efficient but an interesting dwelling.

 

Tom     

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 6:04 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Tom,

 

We can make any capacity needed. The area of the pyrolysis front and the primary air input are easy to manipulate in our system. This particular configuration has a 12” diameter pyrolysis front area and the feed rate has been measured at .67 feet per hour.

 

How big is your home office? My big old 1912 Sears Craftsman kit house only needs 45,000 Btu calculated peak load! 🧐

 

Here was my calculation: 18# biomass x 8600Btu/lb = 154,800 Btu/hr. 30% biochar yield = 46,440 Btu in the char, 108,360 in the syngas. The boiler heat exchanger is rated at 85% efficiency = 92,106 Btu output. 

 

I confess to often not doing the math right - please analyze and comment.

 

Gordon 

 

 

 



On Jul 3, 2020, at 6:30 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

 

Gordon,

 

Thanks. We usually see about 22% of the dry weight as char in a gasifier. That would yield about 4 lb of biochar which would contain about 48,000 Btu (4 lb x 12,000 Btu/lb) of the input fuel energy. That leaves you 42,000 Btu (90,000-48,000 Btu) less losses for heating or 2,300 Btu/lb fuel input and 0.22 lb biochar/lb fuel input.  I need 120,000 Btuh to heat my home office. If I use my 90,000 Btuh heat pump your 40,000 could keep the hydronic system worm on cold nights. Will you be making higher capacity versions? 

 

Tom  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 4:49 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Tom,

 

The unit is a continuous feed TLUD that can modulate its output from approximately 40K to 90K Btu by controlling the primary air flow, which regulates the feedstock flow. The throughput of biomass is calculated on 5K Btu per pound, so 18# per hour at a 90K Btu burn rate. The conversion efficiency to biochar is about 30%. 

 

I just got some quotes from sheet metal fabrication companies on supplying the pyrolysis reactor bodies, instead of us making them as one-offs with lots of hand forming and cutting and welding, and the cost per unit looks like it could reduce from $30K to $12K per unit in stainless steel, using off-the-shelf cast iron boiler components for the burn chamber/heat exchangers. That includes PLC controls and remote system monitoring and operation. We are still seeking investors so we can hit the manufacturing price breaks quickly. It’s a bit of a chicken and egg situation during the early commercialization phase with getting something in production so that investors will feel comfortable committing, but I think we are almost there. 

 

Gordon 

 

 

 

 




On Jul 3, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

 

Gordon, 

 

Thanks for sharing the proposal. That s quite a project. What is your projected heat and material balance for the units? How much fuel will you consume and how much heat and biochar will be produces for the 40 and 90 MBtuh units? What are the projected costs? 

 

Thanks

 

Tom

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi all,

 

It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.

 

Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:

 

 

 

Gordon West

The Trollworks

503 N. “E” Street

Silver City, NM 88061

575-537-3689

 

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller

 

 

 

 

 





On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

 

Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.

 

Hugh McLaughlin

 

On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Paul

My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  

 

Cheers

David Derbowka

 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 

eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |

<~WRD0000.jpg>

 

 

On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

If you’re not wanting to hear from us again click here

<image002.jpg>

 

 

 


Gordon West
 

Tom,

I use 5000 Btus as a handy approximation of the energy contained in syngas from woody biomass. Sorry for the confusion.

[BTW (not to be confused with Btu), I have long done cellulose insulation work as part of my construction contracting business… (-;]

Gordon






On Jul 3, 2020, at 9:02 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Gordon, 
 
Your earlier note assumed 5k Btu/lb from the fuel. At 8,600 Btu/lb you have more energy to work with. 
 
My home + house has a 120K load in winter when the sun is not shining. Not the most efficient but an interesting dwelling. 
 
Tom     
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 6:04 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
Tom,
 
We can make any capacity needed. The area of the pyrolysis front and the primary air input are easy to manipulate in our system. This particular configuration has a 12” diameter pyrolysis front area and the feed rate has been measured at .67 feet per hour.
 
How big is your home office? My big old 1912 Sears Craftsman kit house only needs 45,000 Btu calculated peak load! 🧐
 
Here was my calculation: 18# biomass x 8600Btu/lb = 154,800 Btu/hr. 30% biochar yield = 46,440 Btu in the char, 108,360 in the syngas. The boiler heat exchanger is rated at 85% efficiency = 92,106 Btu output. 
 
I confess to often not doing the math right - please analyze and comment.
 
Gordon 
 
 

 



On Jul 3, 2020, at 6:30 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:
 
Gordon,
 
Thanks. We usually see about 22% of the dry weight as char in a gasifier. That would yield about 4 lb of biochar which would contain about 48,000 Btu (4 lb x 12,000 Btu/lb) of the input fuel energy. That leaves you 42,000 Btu (90,000-48,000 Btu) less losses for heating or 2,300 Btu/lb fuel input and 0.22 lb biochar/lb fuel input.  I need 120,000 Btuh to heat my home office. If I use my 90,000 Btuh heat pump your 40,000 could keep the hydronic system worm on cold nights. Will you be making higher capacity versions? 
 
Tom  
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 4:49 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
Tom,
 
The unit is a continuous feed TLUD that can modulate its output from approximately 40K to 90K Btu by controlling the primary air flow, which regulates the feedstock flow. The throughput of biomass is calculated on 5K Btu per pound, so 18# per hour at a 90K Btu burn rate. The conversion efficiency to biochar is about 30%. 
 
I just got some quotes from sheet metal fabrication companies on supplying the pyrolysis reactor bodies, instead of us making them as one-offs with lots of hand forming and cutting and welding, and the cost per unit looks like it could reduce from $30K to $12K per unit in stainless steel, using off-the-shelf cast iron boiler components for the burn chamber/heat exchangers. That includes PLC controls and remote system monitoring and operation. We are still seeking investors so we can hit the manufacturing price breaks quickly. It’s a bit of a chicken and egg situation during the early commercialization phase with getting something in production so that investors will feel comfortable committing, but I think we are almost there. 
 
Gordon 
 
 
 

 




On Jul 3, 2020, at 5:15 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:
 
Gordon, 
 
Thanks for sharing the proposal. That s quite a project. What is your projected heat and material balance for the units? How much fuel will you consume and how much heat and biochar will be produces for the 40 and 90 MBtuh units? What are the projected costs? 
 
Thanks
 
Tom
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gordon West
Sent: Friday, July 03, 2020 3:14 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: CHAB RE: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
Hi all,
 
It seems that my earlier post has not gotten into the mix of the conversation. Trollworks has just collaborated in a NRCS CIG grant proposal that would see four of our company's biochar boilers installed at greenhouses around the U.S. specifically to make heat from syngas while making biochar. They are projected to be revenue positive (with the biochar sale figured in) and to break even within two years of operation. They are a plug and play replacement for common gas boilers, connecting to standard hydronic heat distribution systems, and can operate on ordinary pellet feedstock, or feedstock made from a wide range of pelletized biomass. They are small (though scalable horizontally by adding units), modulating (from about 40,000 Btu to 90,000 Btu per unit), and are designed to be able to operate 24/7/365. Trollworks is currently piloting a system at its shop, to be deployed to a college campus for demonstration (as soon as the COVID-19 situation allows mobilization) to heat a classroom building.
 
Here is the narrative portion of the NRCS proposal:
 
 
 
Gordon West
The Trollworks
503 N. “E” Street
Silver City, NM 88061
575-537-3689
 
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. 
To change something, build a new model that makes the old model obsolete.”  
– R. Buckminster Fuller
 
 
 
 

 





On Jul 3, 2020, at 3:07 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:
 
Yes, we were using CHAB then.     Combined Heat And Biochar         I still like it.   It is better than CHB.   But will others accept it?   So many talk about wanting to use the heat, but very little is done about the heat use until the pyrolyzer units get large and expensive.    But the much more economically priced RoCC devices should change that.  
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: Hugh McLaughlin <wastemin1@...> 
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 3:52 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Re: CHB RE: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
We coined "CHAB" = Combined Heat and Biochar 10 years ago at CHAB camps. The A was added to avoid confusion with CHP.
 
Hugh McLaughlin
 
On Friday, July 3, 2020, 12:14:23 PM EDT, David R Derbowka <david.derbowka@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Paul
My two cents:  I think of biomass as "solar power".  I also believe functional pyrolysis systems to be more effective and more planet health friendly than solar voltaic cells for example.    If perhaps some nitrous emission is caused, we could probably catch that at the source, if it were deemed as an issue.  
 
Cheers
David Derbowka
 

 

David R Derbowka                   owner
Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |
<~WRD0000.jpg>
 
 
On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 8:02 AM Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Tom wrote:   So with combined heat and biochar you can save money….

 

Is it appropriate (and now the right time) to establish    CHB   Combined Heat and Biochar     as an identifiable term along the lines of     CHP   Combined Heat and Power (which is applied  to all fuels, not just to biomass)?    Such expressions can carry great meaning, but can be very hard to establish unless favored by many people.  

 

Note:   In the discussions for Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR), I have suggested the term   BC+E   to mean Biochar plus Energy     as being distinct from BECCS    which stands for    Bioenergy and Carbon Capture and Storage     (but the CCS part is far from economically viable for sequestration, whereas Biochar is a strong and contemporary candidate.)

 

Somehow, we (the biochar advocates) need to get better recognition and respect for pyrolysis that provides BOTH biochar and thermal energy (or chemicals). 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:01 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 

Kevin,

 

Help me with the math.

 

Fuel oil = $C1/10.5 kWh = $C0.095/kWh

Wood = $C275/5400 kWh = $C 0.051/kWh

Fuel oil/Wood = $0.095/$C 0.051 = 1.86

 

It looks to me like heat from fuel oil is more like 2x the price of wood heat.

 

If I install a commercially available 40 kW (136,00 Btuh) pyrolyzing boiler to heat my house I would get about 0.2 kg biochar/kg fuel and 1.25 kWh heat (95C) per kg fuel. The heat would be worth $0.12/kg fuel ($0.95 x 1.25) and the biochar would cost $C 0.155/kg fuel ($.275-$.12) or $C755/tonne of biochar($0.155/.19)  or $USD 0.23/lb. That would be about $60/CY which is a good wholesale price for biochar in the US which normally sells for $80-$100 and as much as $135-$200/CY delivered in small (CY) quantities.

 

So with combined heat and biochar you can save money either on the heat or the biochar. At 6.2 kg/hr from a 40 kW boiler you would make about 24 tonnes of biochar in 4,000 hours of heating. Putting that in the ground would offset your carbon footprint for the year. Of course you could sell it and reduce your fuel cost by half.   

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Chisholm
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 11:13 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Hi Paul

 

The Graphic is very helpful in putting energy consumption in perspective. However, the sad and cruel reality is that fossil energy is so cheap, it is hardly worthwhile to replace it with the much more expensive biomass energy, except in special cases.

 

For example, I can buy a litre of Diesel Fuel or Furnace oil for about $C1 per litre, or about 10.5/$C1 = $C .105 per kw-hr. OR, I can buy a tonne of air-dried Maple, containing 18 MJ/kg = 5.4 kw-hr per kg = 5,400 kw-hr per tonne. A tonne of such wood costs about $C275, or 5,400/$C275 = $C .1963 per kw-hr. Basically, “Biomass Fuel” is about 2 times as expensive as Oil Fuel”.

 

However, if I have my own source of wood, and I consider it as “Free Exercise”, I can cut, load, haul, split, stack and dry it, tend the fire, and then have “Free Biomass Energy”!! J In most cases, however, the “Biomass Burner” will need the equivalent to a “Tipping Fee” or “Subsidy” of some sort, or a very significant increase in the cost of fossil fuels, to justify burning biomass for thermal energy.

 

Biochar has been shown to have 50+ uses, some of which have already been proven to be profitable to, and of direct benefit to, the Customer. Focusing on these markets, and developing more of these potential markets, will develop a “Market Pull” that will result in a “Biochar Market Growth.”

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

Best wishes,

 

Kevin

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io [mailto:main@Biochar.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul S Anderson
Sent: July 2, 2020 2:05 PM
To: Biochar@groups.io
Cc: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: [Biochar] FW: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

Charists,

 

I previously mentioned an impressive graphic (to me, at least) from a Webinar three days ago.   I have captured it and attached it to this message.   You can also  see the whole webinar and slide deck via links given below.   Further down is more info from the organizers of the webinar, if you want it.   But the main piece is the single graphic.  

 

In brief, it says that there is a MASSIVE opportunity for getting value for the simple heat from pyrolysis.   It is up to us to turn that opportunity into actual cash flow to attain profits from pyrolysis while we get to have the biochar also.

 

Paul

****************

 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: International Hydropower Association <news@...> 
Sent: Thursday, July 2, 2020 6:56 AM
To: Anderson, Paul <psanders@...>
Subject: Watch again: Renewables working together - building back better through a green recovery

 

 

 

2 July 2020

 

 

Dear webinar participants
 
Thank you for joining this week’s REN Alliance webinar, which brought together the world’s leading renewable energy organisations.
 
Special thanks go to our speakers from REN21, the IEA, IRENA, the International Geothermal Association (IGA), the International Solar Energy Society (ISES), the World Bioenergy Association (WBA), the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) and the International Hydropower Association (IHA).
 
As has been widely acknowledged, a green and sustainable Covid-19 recovery will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, stimulate economic growth and create millions of jobs per year.
 
The renewable industries will work together to deliver 100% decarbonised energy. Together, through hybrid technologies like floating PV and pumped storage, they are greater than the sum of their parts. However, to maximise this effectiveness, we call for the following:

  • Accelerated deployment across all sectors, especially in heating, cooling and transport sectors, also by connecting the sectors.
  • Substantial financial incentives for renewables to create competitive advantage for end-users and encourage self-supply.
  • Mechanisms that meet other objectives than only lowest price and consider additional benefits and services of renewables when designing market mechanisms.
  • Broader policy frameworks devoted to a just and inclusive energy transition, that focuses on deployment, enabling and integrating policies and that allows the full variety of investors, from individuals, communities, SMEs up to larger companies to participate and invest.
  • Development of green skills and renewable jobs offered to communities.
  • Mapping and promotion of health benefits of a green energy-based economy. 

For those of you who wish to watch the webinar, it is available to view online and on YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.
 
The slide pack is also available for download here.
 
We look forward to seeing you again at future such webinars.

 

 

Eddie Rich
Chair of REN Alliance and CEO of IHA

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Hydropower Association (IHA) Ltd is a not-for-profit company limited by guarantee incorporated in England (number 8656160). Registered office: Chancery House, St Nicholas Way, Sutton, SM1 1JB, UK

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