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ScientificAmerican.com: Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply #hormones


Kim Chaffee
 

George Kim Chaffee has sent you the following from ScientificAmerican.com:

All, Not sure how this article relates to biochar, but this newly emerging area of research seems important to keep an eye on. Perhaps others will see a connection. Kim

Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/plants-have-hormones-too-and-tweaking-them-could-improve-food-supply/


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© 2020 Scientific American, a division of Springer Nature America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.


Bob Wells
 

Hi Kim,

    Having experimented for years with wood vinegar (wv) a.k.a. liquid smoke extracted from our biochar system, as well as studying anything on the subject that I can find, I have learned that some of the compounds in wv act on plants as a kind of growth hormone.  Some of the rapid regrowth seen after forest fires can be attributed to these same compounds that have condensed on all surfaces during the fire. Used in an extremely small concentration (from 100:1 to 1000:1) in water, the wood vinegar can stimulate growth dramatically in plants as well as turn up chlorophyll production and many other things.  Used in high dosages it can be a natural herbicide by stimulating the plant to death and burning the leaves with it's acetic acid content.  Adding some to the biochar that we then put in our compost at the beginning of the process stimulates microbe populations as well.  We need to take advantage of what we have available from nature and study that before we go trying to twist nature to our will in the laboratory.   
    Like in the case of biochar, I think we need to keep looking back in time for knowledge that has been lost or set aside or only understood in a different part of the world.  I fear that using genetic manipulation as suggested in the article has already proven to be a pandora's box full of unintended consequences like disease.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 2:33 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
George Kim Chaffee has sent you the following from ScientificAmerican.com:

All, Not sure how this article relates to biochar, but this newly emerging area of research seems important to keep an eye on. Perhaps others will see a connection. Kim

Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/plants-have-hormones-too-and-tweaking-them-could-improve-food-supply/


Stay informed. Sign up for Scientific American newsletters.

© 2020 Scientific American, a division of Springer Nature America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.



--
Bob Wells
Biochar Systems

New England Biochar LLC
Box 266 - 40 Redberry Ln.
Eastham, MA 02642, USA
T:  (508) 255-3688
bob@...
www.newenglandbiochar.com



Kim Chaffee
 

Bob,

Thanks for your sage advice, acquired from many years of experimenting with and studying biochar.  I agree that nature’s laboratory, based on millions of years of experimentation, is most often superior to anything man can come up with.  I love it that wood vinegar has so many wonderful uses.  I wish everyone knew about the myriad applications for biochar and wv.      

Kim


On Jul 31, 2020, at 11:47 AM, Bob Wells <bob@...> wrote:

Hi Kim,

    Having experimented for years with wood vinegar (wv) a.k.a. liquid smoke extracted from our biochar system, as well as studying anything on the subject that I can find, I have learned that some of the compounds in wv act on plants as a kind of growth hormone.  Some of the rapid regrowth seen after forest fires can be attributed to these same compounds that have condensed on all surfaces during the fire. Used in an extremely small concentration (from 100:1 to 1000:1) in water, the wood vinegar can stimulate growth dramatically in plants as well as turn up chlorophyll production and many other things.  Used in high dosages it can be a natural herbicide by stimulating the plant to death and burning the leaves with it's acetic acid content.  Adding some to the biochar that we then put in our compost at the beginning of the process stimulates microbe populations as well.  We need to take advantage of what we have available from nature and study that before we go trying to twist nature to our will in the laboratory.   
    Like in the case of biochar, I think we need to keep looking back in time for knowledge that has been lost or set aside or only understood in a different part of the world.  I fear that using genetic manipulation as suggested in the article has already proven to be a pandora's box full of unintended consequences like disease.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 2:33 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
George Kim Chaffee has sent you the following from ScientificAmerican.com:

All, Not sure how this article relates to biochar, but this newly emerging area of research seems important to keep an eye on. Perhaps others will see a connection. Kim

Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply


Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering


https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/plants-have-hormones-too-and-tweaking-them-could-improve-food-supply/


Stay informed. Sign up for Scientific American newsletters.

© 2020 Scientific American, a division of Springer Nature America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.





--
Bob Wells
Biochar Systems

New England Biochar LLC
Box 266 - 40 Redberry Ln.
Eastham, MA 02642, USA
T:  (508) 255-3688
bob@...
www.newenglandbiochar.com




Anand Karve
 

I have served as research director of an Indian seed company and also as head of agricultural research section of a multinational company. In my career I have come across literally 100s of compounds, ranging from urea to long chain fatty alcohols that stimulated plant growth when sprayed on plants as a dilute solution. In all the cases I found that these compounds stimulated the action of indole acetic acid, a plant growth hormone. I could not publish my findings because my employers wanted to keep my findings under wraps.
Yours
A.D.Karve

On Fri 31 Jul, 2020, 9:17 PM Bob Wells <bob@... wrote:
Hi Kim,

    Having experimented for years with wood vinegar (wv) a.k.a. liquid smoke extracted from our biochar system, as well as studying anything on the subject that I can find, I have learned that some of the compounds in wv act on plants as a kind of growth hormone.  Some of the rapid regrowth seen after forest fires can be attributed to these same compounds that have condensed on all surfaces during the fire. Used in an extremely small concentration (from 100:1 to 1000:1) in water, the wood vinegar can stimulate growth dramatically in plants as well as turn up chlorophyll production and many other things.  Used in high dosages it can be a natural herbicide by stimulating the plant to death and burning the leaves with it's acetic acid content.  Adding some to the biochar that we then put in our compost at the beginning of the process stimulates microbe populations as well.  We need to take advantage of what we have available from nature and study that before we go trying to twist nature to our will in the laboratory.   
    Like in the case of biochar, I think we need to keep looking back in time for knowledge that has been lost or set aside or only understood in a different part of the world.  I fear that using genetic manipulation as suggested in the article has already proven to be a pandora's box full of unintended consequences like disease.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 2:33 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
George Kim Chaffee has sent you the following from ScientificAmerican.com:

All, Not sure how this article relates to biochar, but this newly emerging area of research seems important to keep an eye on. Perhaps others will see a connection. Kim

Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/plants-have-hormones-too-and-tweaking-them-could-improve-food-supply/


Stay informed. Sign up for Scientific American newsletters.

© 2020 Scientific American, a division of Springer Nature America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.



--
Bob Wells
Biochar Systems

New England Biochar LLC
Box 266 - 40 Redberry Ln.
Eastham, MA 02642, USA
T:  (508) 255-3688
bob@...
www.newenglandbiochar.com



Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Anand

There is a few papers published now that show this.  We have seen it with application of biochar based foliar sprays and wood vinegar.  We have a couple of pacers coming out soon when I and my colleagues get time to finish them and get them reviewed.

But the actions of wood vinegar are complex and involve  a number of changes that also relate to endophytes and internal Eh in various cells place changes in reactive oxygen species.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Aug 1, 2020 at 4:30 AM Anand Karve <adkarve@...> wrote:
I have served as research director of an Indian seed company and also as head of agricultural research section of a multinational company. In my career I have come across literally 100s of compounds, ranging from urea to long chain fatty alcohols that stimulated plant growth when sprayed on plants as a dilute solution. In all the cases I found that these compounds stimulated the action of indole acetic acid, a plant growth hormone. I could not publish my findings because my employers wanted to keep my findings under wraps.
Yours
A.D.Karve

On Fri 31 Jul, 2020, 9:17 PM Bob Wells <bob@... wrote:
Hi Kim,

    Having experimented for years with wood vinegar (wv) a.k.a. liquid smoke extracted from our biochar system, as well as studying anything on the subject that I can find, I have learned that some of the compounds in wv act on plants as a kind of growth hormone.  Some of the rapid regrowth seen after forest fires can be attributed to these same compounds that have condensed on all surfaces during the fire. Used in an extremely small concentration (from 100:1 to 1000:1) in water, the wood vinegar can stimulate growth dramatically in plants as well as turn up chlorophyll production and many other things.  Used in high dosages it can be a natural herbicide by stimulating the plant to death and burning the leaves with it's acetic acid content.  Adding some to the biochar that we then put in our compost at the beginning of the process stimulates microbe populations as well.  We need to take advantage of what we have available from nature and study that before we go trying to twist nature to our will in the laboratory.   
    Like in the case of biochar, I think we need to keep looking back in time for knowledge that has been lost or set aside or only understood in a different part of the world.  I fear that using genetic manipulation as suggested in the article has already proven to be a pandora's box full of unintended consequences like disease.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 2:33 PM Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...> wrote:
George Kim Chaffee has sent you the following from ScientificAmerican.com:

All, Not sure how this article relates to biochar, but this newly emerging area of research seems important to keep an eye on. Perhaps others will see a connection. Kim

Plants Have Hormones, Too, and Tweaking Them Could Improve Food Supply

Crops sense and respond to drought, pests and other stressors in surprising ways, researchers are discovering

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/plants-have-hormones-too-and-tweaking-them-could-improve-food-supply/


Stay informed. Sign up for Scientific American newsletters.

© 2020 Scientific American, a division of Springer Nature America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.



--
Bob Wells
Biochar Systems

New England Biochar LLC
Box 266 - 40 Redberry Ln.
Eastham, MA 02642, USA
T:  (508) 255-3688
bob@...
www.newenglandbiochar.com



mikethewormguy
 

Anand,

As I am sure you know, the amino acid tryptophan is the precursor/parent for IAA (indoleacetic acid), the rooting hormone.

We like to companion plant with radishes because the put alot of tryptophan into their root zone for their neighbors to take advantage of...

my 2 cents.....

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Stephen Joseph
 

Radishes love poultry litter biochar (See Chan et al and Van Zwieten et al).

Great idea Mike to do companion plant with radish and have a high mineral ash biochar underneath the seeds/seedling

My 1 cent

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 12:34 AM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Anand,

As I am sure you know, the amino acid tryptophan is the precursor/parent for IAA (indoleacetic acid), the rooting hormone.

We like to companion plant with radishes because the put alot of tryptophan into their root zone for their neighbors to take advantage of...

my 2 cents.....

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


mikethewormguy
 

Radish is a nice neighbor with a quick turn in the ground. 

 Radish also is a great soil improver and will open up clay soils.  One can grow the big radish varieties and then leave the radishes in the soil to degrade.  

Creating a radish / mineral biochar platform for soil improvement is both charmin and radishing.......   

1 more cent.....

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone