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Today in 'The Conversation' Australia linking California's fire situation scenario etc. #wildfire


Frank Strie
 

California is on fire. From across the Pacific, Australians watch on and buckle up

August 31, 2020 6.01am AEST

https://theconversation.com/california-is-on-fire-from-across-the-pacific-australians-watch-on-and-buckle-up-145170?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20August%2031%202020%20-%201717316587&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20August%2031%202020%20-%201717316587+CID_ae5b14b9ff5040e43343e85cc386826b&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=California%20is%20on%20fire%20From%20across%20the%20Pacific%20Australians%20watch%20on%20and%20buckle%20up

California is ablaze, again. Currently, the second and third largest fires in the US state’s history are burning at the same time, and are only partially controlled. Already, seven people have died and 2,144 structures are damaged – and their fire season still has months to run.

The outbreak continues a relentless trend of bigger and more destructive fires in the western US, including California’ largest fire in 2018.

For Australians, the spectacle of California burning is deeply concerning. It’s just months since our last fire season, concentrated in a band of eucalyptus forests along the continent’s southeast coast.

There are strong parallels between the two disasters: drought, parched landscapes, high temperatures, prolonged heatwaves and dry lightning storms to set it all off. And both Australia and California are particularly vulnerable as climate change makes bushfires worse. So let’s look at the fiery fate we share with those across the Pacific – and how we must all adapt.  …
Cont.

Our mission is to share knowledge and inform decisions.



My comment a few seconds ago

Frank Strie

logged in via Facebook

Yes, this article made the points of similarity between SE Australia and California (and surely even without mentioning here also) the other Pacific North West states and the Mediterranean Countries in Europe, and so on.
What is still missing in this picture and debate is the fact is that the “Fuel” is the syngas / the volatile energy that comes out of the woody biomass when the temperature is above 350°C or so. Vegetation in our landscape is a lot of stored solar energy. The aim should be to see it as that and to address it accordingly.
Over the last 13+ years I am collaborating with people and organisations around the world Pyrogenic Carbon Capture & Sequestration / Storage.
If we put the syngas to good use or at least strategically oxidise this away from the black pyrogenic carbon = char, the resulting black fraction of biomass can be put to many uses.
Here the latest publicly available webinar presented by Kathleen Draper on the 21. August 2020 (Tassie time):

Biochar for innovative products - on the use of biochar beyond agricultural soil uses (e.g. animal feed, building materials & composites, etc.).

Our speaker, Kathleen Draper, is a member of the Board of the International Biochar Initiative Board (IBI) and Chair of IBI’s Information Hub. She is also the US Director of the Ithaka Institute for Carbon Intelligence. The Institute is an open source network focusing on beneficial carbon sequestration strategies which simultaneously provide economic development opportunities both in the developed and developing world. She is an editor and writer for The Biochar Journal, sponsored by the Ithaka Institute.This webinar is made possible through a partnership with the U.S. Biochar Initiative and Southern Regional Extension Forestry.
Recording
:  http://www.forestrywebinars.net/webinars/biochar_for_innovative_products

It would be great to have an active dialog and collaboration with the authors and their team as soon as practical and possible.
I am based in Northern Tasmania and as a ProSilva Forester / Master Forester, my background is in restorative & regenerative forest and land management including responsible forest fuel / energy utilisation.Feel free to get in touch after visiting our website
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au/products  and that of close business partners: https://www.tarkinetrails.com.au

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So dear Biochar Discussion Group participants, here is the opportunity to get involved with The Conversation for you as well.
Time will show the response.
Frank again

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Miles
Sent: Monday, August 31, 2020 7:27 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: EPA and USDA Announce Competition to Advance Agricultural Sustainability in the United States

 

Will do.


Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 2:24 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: EPA and USDA Announce Competition to Advance Agricultural Sustainability in the United States

 

You need to write to Genxing Pan

 

On Mon, Aug 31, 2020 at 7:03 AM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Data talks. Where do we find it? : - )

 

Thanks

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 1:56 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: EPA and USDA Announce Competition to Advance Agricultural Sustainability in the United States

 

Hi Tom

 

Why dont you show them the results they are getting in China with adding biochar minerals to NPK with corn (maize).  last results I saw in China were about 15% yield improvement.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Mon, Aug 31, 2020 at 2:27 AM Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizers have been in the agricultural literature, such as the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America, for a few years. Fertilizer companies have launched several products which promote enhanced efficiency of one component or another. Major companies like Cargill and the National Corn Growers Association and soybean organizations support the Soil Health Partnership and Soil Health Initiative which promote EEF. There are likely many drivers, the runoff and leaching issues probably being the main ones.

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of mikethewormguy via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2020 5:48 AM
To: Biochar Group <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] FW: EPA and USDA Announce Competition to Advance Agricultural Sustainability in the United States

 

Tom,

 

To Enhance the Efficiency of Fertilizers in corn maybe more about updating  growing practices than making a new fertilizer.

 

Biomass Char could help improve Fertilizer Use Efficiency by allowing corn growers to use less fertilizer thus reducing run off and improving profitability by avoiding costs. The ROI from a biomass char solution is cumulative over time across multiple growing cycles.....

 

One challenge is crafting a solution that the growers can afford, be willing to pay for, and that can be executed by the grower.

 

I am curious who is asking for the EEF ?  Is it the corn growers. ?  .....

 

my 2 cents,

 

Mike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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