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Emissions of Nitrous Oxide, a Climate Super-Pollutant, Are Rising Fast on a Worst-Case Trajectory | InsideClimate News #climate #emissions #nitrousoxide


Kim Chaffee
 

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&;utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005


Harald Bier
 

Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&;utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005





Harald Bier
 

… I did not mention that this has to be a complementary to good agricultural practices. Biochar should, of course, not be used to make up for bad mistakes, but it can do a lot of good. 
It is kind of like the creation of carbon sinks, which should not be seen as a substitute for emission reduction. 

Am 10.10.2020 um 20:14 schrieb Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...>:

Dear Kim, 

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this: 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005










Geoff Thomas
 

So reducing the N20 is like emissions reduction, as it is an emission, but if you for eg feed cows charcoal, - the which reduces methane, reducing emissions and turning it into more cow, and stores carbon in the soil, - which is Drawing Back the carbon we put into the air, it also reduces N20, so Harald does the N20 not be emitted by the cow or not produced because the charcoal in it’s system sequesters it like the charcoal?

- being provocative because I don’t know but suspect you do :)

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 4:14 am, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@biochar-industry.com> wrote:

Dear Kim,

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@gmail.com>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&;utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005









Harald Bier
 

Dear Geoff, 

of course you’re right here. Just that I wouldn’t call the avoidance of emission sequestration. The added carbon that remains in the soil: yes. 
I was referring to changing our practices in order to emit less, e.g. through improved fertilization techniques, the use of organic fertilization etc. AND using biochar as a complementary. 
Distinguishing between emission reduction and carbon sinks is important when it comes to carbon accounting and there it has to be clearly divided, that’s what I think and this is why I mentioned it. 
I also know there is no C in N2O ;-)
With regards to biochar in dairy, I recommend this: https://pyrolysis.cals.cornell.edu/ Another great piece of work by Kathleen Draper.

Best, Harald 

Am 11.10.2020 um 05:54 schrieb Geoff Thomas <wind@...>:

So reducing the N20 is like emissions reduction, as it is an emission, but if you for eg feed cows charcoal, - the which reduces methane, reducing emissions and turning it into more cow, and stores carbon in the soil, - which is Drawing Back the carbon we put into the air, it also reduces N20, so Harald does the N20 not be emitted by the cow or not produced because the charcoal in it’s system sequesters it like the charcoal?

- being provocative because I don’t know but suspect you do :)

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 4:14 am, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Kim, 

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this: 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005
















Eli Fishpaw
 

When considering Greenhouse Gases, we commonly refer to the buildup of carbon in the atmosphere, primarily CO2, but also methane and nitrous oxides.  I am in favor of a carbon tax to create market incentive to reduce emissions.  However, I would prefer it be a greenhouse gas tax that would be based on CO2 equivalents.  This would include N2O, which has no carbon, but has the heat retention impact of 298 times that of  CO2, therefore CO2 Equivalent of 298.  Therefore, the tax rate of a ton of CO2 x 298 would be the tax for a ton of N2O.  It is shocking to see that most refrigerants used in refrigerators, ac and heat pumps has CO2 Equivalent of many thousands.  
 
If our practices avoid N2O emissions, we are reducing the CO2 that needs to be removed.  Catching ammonia from urine to feed soil microbes would also reduce net emissions of GHG.  Although, until we achieve net sequestration of CO2 equivalents, finding carbon sinks such a biochar in soil will remain a important possibility for finding the balance we are looking for.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Harald Bier [mailto:Harald.Bier@...]
To: "main@biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, 11 Oct 2020 15:10:27 +0200
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Emissions of Nitrous Oxide, a Climate Super-Pollutant, Are Rising Fast on a Worst-Case Trajectory | InsideClimate News

Dear Geoff, 
 
of course you’re right here. Just that I wouldn’t call the avoidance of emission sequestration. The added carbon that remains in the soil: yes. 
I was referring to changing our practices in order to emit less, e.g. through improved fertilization techniques, the use of organic fertilization etc. AND using biochar as a complementary. 
Distinguishing between emission reduction and carbon sinks is important when it comes to carbon accounting and there it has to be clearly divided, that’s what I think and this is why I mentioned it. 
I also know there is no C in N2O ;-)
With regards to biochar in dairy, I recommend this: https://pyrolysis.cals.cornell.edu/ Another great piece of work by Kathleen Draper.
 
Best, Harald 

Am 11.10.2020 um 05:54 schrieb Geoff Thomas <wind@...>:
So reducing the N20 is like emissions reduction, as it is an emission, but if you for eg feed cows charcoal, - the which reduces methane, reducing emissions and turning it into more cow, and stores carbon in the soil, - which is Drawing Back the carbon we put into the air, it also reduces N20, so Harald does the N20 not be emitted by the cow or not produced because the charcoal in it’s system sequesters it like the charcoal?

- being provocative because I don’t know but suspect you do :)

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 4:14 am, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Kim, 

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this: 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005















Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Harald,  thanks for replying, good to discuss these issues,  - in regards to "Just that I wouldn’t call the avoidance of emission sequestration.” I think we may benefit by gnawing a bit more finely, although ultimate certainty may elude us.

You have suggested Kathleen Draper as your source, and indeed she draws on comprehensive sources in Europe, where it is said that more charcoal is fed to animals than turned into Biochar by current methods to turn it into Biochar.
IE, the charcoal is turned into Biochar by the animal’s digestive system.

As a contrast I submit Doug Pow’s videos, - here the first, - you need not listen to the Avocado second half. - please note the references folk.

 Then the second video, the which is a sort of reprise, or maybe summary, excepting a particular section in the video where he talks of reducing, etc N20 just after the 3 minute mark, and then up to the 3 minute 40 seconds talking of reducing/eliminating the methane, by its conversion by bacteria and creating more Cow.  - so sequestering the methane, not avoiding the Methane, although another question is as to what happens to that sequestered methane in the future of the cow, - is it confirmed as sequestered or lost as is carbon in the forest, - returning to the atmosphere? Does it get emitted if eaten or sequestered if treated by aneorobic digestion, eg Gobar gas or developments from such? Is methane so formed used to generate electricity then avoiding not sequestering? - Do meat eaters fart more than vegetarians, and how much N20 in each group’s farts? - 
A subject of intimate research..

  - however, the second video.. 

In that first bit of the 3 minutes he doesn’t say that the N20 is made into Cow, just the Methane.

As many have watched and thought about that video, there is probably more data about whether the N20 is sequestered or avoided, hopefully another reader may enlighten us on that issue.

Thanks for your patience, please don’t think I am pettyfogging, these will in the near future probably be seen as major issues.
 - With good reason.
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 11:10 pm, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Geoff, 

of course you’re right here. Just that I wouldn’t call the avoidance of emission sequestration. The added carbon that remains in the soil: yes. 
I was referring to changing our practices in order to emit less, e.g. through improved fertilization techniques, the use of organic fertilization etc. AND using biochar as a complementary. 
Distinguishing between emission reduction and carbon sinks is important when it comes to carbon accounting and there it has to be clearly divided, that’s what I think and this is why I mentioned it. 
I also know there is no C in N2O ;-)
With regards to biochar in dairy, I recommend this: https://pyrolysis.cals.cornell.edu/ Another great piece of work by Kathleen Draper.

Best, Harald 

Am 11.10.2020 um 05:54 schrieb Geoff Thomas <wind@...>:

So reducing the N20 is like emissions reduction, as it is an emission, but if you for eg feed cows charcoal, - the which reduces methane, reducing emissions and turning it into more cow, and stores carbon in the soil, - which is Drawing Back the carbon we put into the air, it also reduces N20, so Harald does the N20 not be emitted by the cow or not produced because the charcoal in it’s system sequesters it like the charcoal?

- being provocative because I don’t know but suspect you do :)

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 4:14 am, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Kim, 

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this: 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005

















Geoff Thomas
 

A further issue, - when I was calculating, in my humble way,  the reduction of feeding cows charcaol in Australia, - 2% of our national greenhouse emissions, and then methane, a further 6%, based on methane being 80 or 90 times more potent than Carbon Diocide, but only for 14 years, whereas C02 perhaps hundreds of years, there must be some idea of the "Half-Life” or whatever is appropriate for N20? 
 =  a further question to this discussion.

G

On 11 Oct 2020, at 11:10 pm, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Geoff, 

of course you’re right here. Just that I wouldn’t call the avoidance of emission sequestration. The added carbon that remains in the soil: yes. 
I was referring to changing our practices in order to emit less, e.g. through improved fertilization techniques, the use of organic fertilization etc. AND using biochar as a complementary. 
Distinguishing between emission reduction and carbon sinks is important when it comes to carbon accounting and there it has to be clearly divided, that’s what I think and this is why I mentioned it. 
I also know there is no C in N2O ;-)
With regards to biochar in dairy, I recommend this: https://pyrolysis.cals.cornell.edu/ Another great piece of work by Kathleen Draper.

Best, Harald 

Am 11.10.2020 um 05:54 schrieb Geoff Thomas <wind@...>:

So reducing the N20 is like emissions reduction, as it is an emission, but if you for eg feed cows charcoal, - the which reduces methane, reducing emissions and turning it into more cow, and stores carbon in the soil, - which is Drawing Back the carbon we put into the air, it also reduces N20, so Harald does the N20 not be emitted by the cow or not produced because the charcoal in it’s system sequesters it like the charcoal?

- being provocative because I don’t know but suspect you do :)

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 4:14 am, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Kim, 

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this: 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005

















Harald Bier
 

Thanks for sharing, 

I know about the work of Doug Pow as we are well connected to ANZBIG and I am actually trying to convince some farmers here to give it a try. 
Such a simple and effective way.
N2O CO2-Equivalent is generally calculated as 298 times that of CO2. That’s according to IPCC 4. 

Best

Am 13.10.2020 um 06:54 schrieb Geoff Thomas <wind@...>:

A further issue, - when I was calculating, in my humble way,  the reduction of feeding cows charcaol in Australia, - 2% of our national greenhouse emissions, and then methane, a further 6%, based on methane being 80 or 90 times more potent than Carbon Diocide, but only for 14 years, whereas C02 perhaps hundreds of years, there must be some idea of the "Half-Life” or whatever is appropriate for N20? 
 =  a further question to this discussion.

G

On 11 Oct 2020, at 11:10 pm, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Geoff, 

of course you’re right here. Just that I wouldn’t call the avoidance of emission sequestration. The added carbon that remains in the soil: yes. 
I was referring to changing our practices in order to emit less, e.g. through improved fertilization techniques, the use of organic fertilization etc. AND using biochar as a complementary. 
Distinguishing between emission reduction and carbon sinks is important when it comes to carbon accounting and there it has to be clearly divided, that’s what I think and this is why I mentioned it. 
I also know there is no C in N2O ;-)
With regards to biochar in dairy, I recommend this: https://pyrolysis.cals.cornell.edu/ Another great piece of work by Kathleen Draper.

Best, Harald 

Am 11.10.2020 um 05:54 schrieb Geoff Thomas <wind@...>:

So reducing the N20 is like emissions reduction, as it is an emission, but if you for eg feed cows charcoal, - the which reduces methane, reducing emissions and turning it into more cow, and stores carbon in the soil, - which is Drawing Back the carbon we put into the air, it also reduces N20, so Harald does the N20 not be emitted by the cow or not produced because the charcoal in it’s system sequesters it like the charcoal?

- being provocative because I don’t know but suspect you do :)

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

On 11 Oct 2020, at 4:14 am, Harald Bier <Harald.Bier@...> wrote:

Dear Kim, 

I would say so. At least for us, this is one of our many arguments for the use of biochar in agriculture. If you’re interested, look at this: 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/270822030_The_molar_H_COrg_ratio_of_biochar_is_a_key_factor_in_mitigating_N2O_emissions_from_soil

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0048969718339330 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcbb.12390

Best, Harald



Am 10.10.2020 um 17:07 schrieb Kim Chaffee <kim.chaffee2@...>:

All,
Does this new research report that exposes the major contribution of N2O from overuse of fertilizer present an opportunity for biochar?
Kim


https://insideclimatenews.org/news/07102020/nitrous-oxide-fertilizer-emissions-nature-study?utm_source=InsideClimate+News&utm_campaign=c580aa2b23-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_29c928ffb5-c580aa2b23-327797005