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Snow piles: Filtration of contaminates including Road Salt #snowmelt #filtration


Robert Lehmert
 

Hello -- 

I've been unable to find any research on the following:

In snow country, many municipalities and commercial properties plow snow into large piles or truck it to central locations awaiting Spring melt. When it melts, the pile will release any thing that's in the snow, including debris, road salt, gritty hydrocarbons, etc. The water will quickly drain into the nearest body of water, potentially contributing to flooding. Any contaminants will be released untreated.

I'm familiar with research on BC in saline soils, but I do not see any research on the ability of BC (with additive emoluments) to filter out road salt. Even if removal is not 100%, a meaningfullreduction of road salt entering the waterways could be very useful and marketable.

Your comments are appreciated.

Rob


mikethewormguy
 

Rob,

I have been curious about this application for biomass char for awhile now.

We are broadcasting now a blend of vermichar, and gypsum over the turf area where we will be piling the snow over the coming months. We have found this reduces turf stress over the next 6 months.

It would be interesting to see if a mobile modular pyrolysis system could be used to melt snow and the biochar created used to treat the melt liquid.

Think of an application at an airport.......?????

my 2 cents,

Mike



Robert Lehmert
 

Hi Mike

That should improve soil health, but I'm looking for something different -- I want to adsorb Na onto biochar and retain it. 

I imagine biochar naturally adsorbs some amount of Na -- although I have not seen any studies.

Does anyone know chemical bonds to improve that  Na-BC adsorption process? Hugh McLaughlin and/or Chuck Hegberg perhaps?


Hugh McLaughlin
 

Group and especially Rob Lehmert,

Sodium (Na+) is the most water soluble of all the common cations, so it is retained on biochar with the lowest force and displaced by essentially any other cation or heavy metal cation.

I would not recommend biochar to remove sodium to any appreciable extent or cost-effectively.

- Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

On Tuesday, November 3, 2020, 11:24:30 AM EST, Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert@...> wrote:


Hi Mike

That should improve soil health, but I'm looking for something different -- I want to adsorb Na onto biochar and retain it. 

I imagine biochar naturally adsorbs some amount of Na -- although I have not seen any studies.

Does anyone know chemical bonds to improve that  Na-BC adsorption process? Hugh McLaughlin and/or Chuck Hegberg perhaps?


Robert Lehmert
 

OK, Hugh, thanks for the heads-up.

Not the first blind-alley I've looked down.