Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.


Frank Strie
 

Hello Norm and Ingelore,
Thanks for your inquiry and for recognising our KON-TIKI-TAS Shuttle,  a road registered  trailer mounted 1m3  deep cone kin and this was designed and built and is operated in Tasmania / Australia.
The purpose is to be able to take the kiln to the feedstock / to the biomass  and be able to have a multi- purpose material transporter.
The process of carbonising biomass to become biochar is just the 1st step in the production process.
Because it is essential to charge the fresh char with nutrients to become good quality, life supporting Biochar I thought about it in July 2014 when we designed the first KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kiln to be able to “flood quench” our kilns not only with water, but with a liquid manure slurry instead as the 2. Step.
The 3rd step is crushing / hammer milling the fresh coarse, nutrient enriched char to be optimised for large surface and
the 4th step to cure & mature like a good compost or a good cider fermentation with time, say about 6 weeks plus.

I can see no advantage to create lots of clean fresh char to be surface applied through a fertiliser spreader. It would result in a growth preventing / retarding surface coating, more like a non-toxic herbicide, until over time this char is loaded with nutrients again over time.
Feel free to explore our website
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au , but also the fantastically valuable article about ‘How Biochar Works in Soil’ written by Kelpie Wilson some 6 years ago:   https://www.biochar-journal.org/itjo/media/doc/1414798880420.pdf

Best regards from under Down Under
Frank again


 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Norm Baker
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 4:52 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Thank you, Ingelore. I knew about that one and it is a good unit but not the farmer who made his own owered Kon-Tiki. If I could only remember!?!

 

Norm


Geoff Thomas
 

Good on you Frank, I support your position to produce and supply real Biochar that will enrich the soil and produce higher growth rates, and hopefully heal the soil as appropriate.
Cheers, 
 Geoff.

On 6 Dec 2020, at 7:37 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Norm and Ingelore,
Thanks for your inquiry and for recognising our KON-TIKI-TAS Shuttle,  a road registered  trailer mounted 1m3  deep cone kin and this was designed and built and is operated in Tasmania / Australia.
The purpose is to be able to take the kiln to the feedstock / to the biomass  and be able to have a multi- purpose material transporter. 
The process of carbonising biomass to become biochar is just the 1st step in the production process. 
Because it is essential to charge the fresh char with nutrients to become good quality, life supporting Biochar I thought about it in July 2014 when we designed the first KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kiln to be able to “flood quench” our kilns not only with water, but with a liquid manure slurry instead as the 2. Step.
The 3rd step is crushing / hammer milling the fresh coarse, nutrient enriched char to be optimised for large surface and 
the 4th step to cure & mature like a good compost or a good cider fermentation with time, say about 6 weeks plus.

I can see no advantage to create lots of clean fresh char to be surface applied through a fertiliser spreader. It would result in a growth preventing / retarding surface coating, more like a non-toxic herbicide, until over time this char is loaded with nutrients again over time. 
Feel free to explore our website 
www.terrapretadevelopments.com.au , but also the fantastically valuable article about ‘How Biochar Works in Soil’ written by Kelpie Wilson some 6 years ago:   https://www.biochar-journal.org/itjo/media/doc/1414798880420.pdf 

Best regards from under Down Under
Frank again


 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Norm Baker
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 4:52 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.
 
Thank you, Ingelore. I knew about that one and it is a good unit but not the farmer who made his own owered Kon-Tiki. If I could only remember!?!
 
Norm



Don Coyne
 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Paul S Anderson
 

Don, Paul Taylor, Stephen,

 

Please send me a link to information  and photos about

 

“…Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective…”

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, December 6, 2020 5:29 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Frank Strie
 

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Norm Baker
 

Frank;

Once a grower learns about the value and use of biochar, they become intellectual sponges for more information so they can apply it to their growing operations. Seen this several times with students at Evergreen State College where they have a very good organic farming program and other commercial and organic growers here in Washington state. That said, you are correct in saying "I can see no advantage to create lots of clean fresh char to be surface applied through a fertiliser spreader. It would result in a growth preventing / retarding surface coating, more like a non-toxic herbicide, until over time this char is loaded with nutrients again over time." 

The people I have met just about always know that biochar needs to be charged with nutrients before being applied to the land. They also know soils need to to be tested for what nutrients are needed. They also know that organic amendments and the proper management are, as I have found, far better for crop production than chemical amendments. That farmer was loading his biochar before spreading it on his soil - as I recall. 

I explored you website a long time ago and was impressed by the products seen there, although I have no first hand experience. I have also worked with Paul Taylor on biochar kilns.

It seems to me that it is time for you to develop a Kon-Tiki that does operate as a spreader. It would require significant modifications to protect necessary machinery and movable parts from the heat. But, I cannot imagine that it is not doable.

Regards

Norm


Don Coyne
 

Hi Paul, 

I've attached a few photos and PT said in his email;

Chars,

Don 

Hello Don:

IN the last days I put the kon-tiki together with the hood and commissioned  it – attached photos.  We had a biochar crew from Japan visit. I think my simple bent pipe legs worked out well.  The legs are simply slipped over pins welded to the rims of the 1.2m hood and 1.65m kiln – hood is installed while kiln is tipped to the ground. The hood extension is just light metal.  I have a big gap, but can easily cut legs to reduce. The whole can be tilted to the ground to empty with no disassembly.

Emissions were lower than Stephen expected, <200ppm CO. \


Don Coyne
 

Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don 


Stephen Joseph
 

To All

Don is correct Paul Taylor and I did emissions testing with a hooded kiln.   When operate with dry wood really low emissions and good quality biochar. My main concern with the Kontiki was the low yield and the lack of flexibility with feedstock and need to constantly add biomass.  We never got over 18%.  During our summer when temperatures get over 40 centigrade you dont need to go to a Sauna. Plus possible issues with EPA and fire authorities

The idea behind the present design is to meet both emissions standards, fire regulations, ability to use a range of feedstocks, high biochar yields controllable temperature to optimise properties,  transportable on a trailer towed by an SUV  and using the waste heat at an affordable price.  The kiln is designed to produce a single batch (about 2 cum. of biomass in) in 3 hours with a yield of 30-35% depending on feed stock.  If you add minerals (especially clay) you can get around 50% yield and activate the surface with the clay and other minerals.

My colleague and I have designed the unit so you can add a heat exchanger to use waste heat, collect wood vinegar, smoke meat and fish, can bake bread and pizzas  and dry crops with the residual heat in the bricks at the bottom. Because the design is modular you can make bigger or smaller and we can mass produce to keep cost down.  Basically allows farmer to make a good return from multi uses.

Unit 1 comes out next week and we will start to test/modify  in the next few weeks.  We are hoping to mass produce for $15,000-$20,000 Aus.

We have also designed a container unit that again will be a kit of parts.  Next years project.

Regards
Stephen


On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 8:25 AM Don Coyne <execdirect@...> wrote:
Hi Frank,

I replied as CEO of ANZBIG because this is something we are working through in the "Draft Code of Practice for Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar in Australia and New Zealand" https://anzbig.org/resources/ Effectively, it doesn't matter how you make it as long as you meet your state regulations for emissions, waste and fire but rather whether it will pass the testing regime so that it can be safely applied to soil.

In the devastating Australian bushfires last summer I heard someone started a fire on the NSW South Coast burning off in drums and I thought to myself, oh geez one day biochar is going to be associated with bushfires so we've got to be really careful because whilst you might follow best practice, others won't. 

As far as Byron Biochar goes, I drew up a business plan based on my understanding of NSW legislation at the time, i.e. you can make and apply biochar to your own soil but as soon as you sell it to your neighbor you've got to meet the emissions and waste guidelines. Therefore, I started out offering a mobile service using a Kontiki to property owners during burn-off season and aligned myself with advanced technology that has EPA approval on production to be an authorised reseller of char and vinegar. As it turns out even this may not be enough and we are talking with NSW EPA right now. 

The webinar where HP mentions the 35 years to get a Kontiki to carbon neutral/negative because it releases methane is in this webinar from early 2019 after the IPCC special report mentioned PyCCS/Biochar for the first time. Perhaps his view on this has changed and once again I know it's better than burning off or landfilling https://biochar-international.org/webinars/ibi-educational-webinar-series-carbon-sink-trading/ 

I know it's more expensive but I still think a producer could get return on investment to go the next step and have a fully enclosed kiln that is safe to operate even during total fire ban and has the capability of producing vinegar too. SJ has designed a kit one recently and of course many know of the "Big Roo" by Rusell Burnett. Also, Robert Laird of Pyrolitech has designed a nice little unit that does both and he claims that he can compress the syngas into a bottle (further regulations would be required on that). 

I have attached a few photos of the kilns I am talking of and a link to video by Pyrolitech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYabmsbZ3rc 

Chars,

Don 


mikethewormguy
 

Stephen,

Do you have thoughts regarding the ROI of your basic biochar system ?  I expect the ROI would be crop and/application related....

Are you making a post production cook book for users....?

Mike



Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Mike

ROI really depends on what products you make.  In Australia the best returns are from selling to horse owners see various web sites on companies selling feedchar in Australia).  Every business will need to work out markets costs and returns.  

Of course we will give an instruction manual that has lots of tips about formulations.

Regards
Stephen

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 10:18 AM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stephen,

Do you have thoughts regarding the ROI of your basic biochar system ?  I expect the ROI would be crop and/application related....

Are you making a post production cook book for users....?

Mike



d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Frank,

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
Social icon Social icon Social icon

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Frank Strie
 

Yes Michael,
How about next to an apple / Fruit orchard, Hazelnut Grove, in an Olive Grove, sloping Vineyard etc. etc. Talk is cheap and doing it counts more than poking around…
Anyone interested to know, when it comes to stationary and high tech / industrial scale projects would be able to see what else we have on offer under our Business webpage under products.
After 6 years the current KON-TIKI-TAS kiln models are all still batch processes from 300 litre,  1000litre  and 1,850 litre per batch.
In 2021 we intend to also have a 100 litre mini model and a seriously larger Jumbo model as a continuous flow will various “ bells and whistles” and world first features.
We will be able to handle materials of all sorts and in all sorts of locations and all sorts of scales, all depending on the business case and local regional situation and needs.
So far we are happy to know all our clients have a reason why they like to do business with us.
To get a sludge and biosolids pyrolysis plant project and a wood-power co-generation plant become reality takes time and commitment to detail from the word go.
To me the little 300 litre  KON-TIKI-TAS Compact kiln model is to me and our clients in Tassie and Queensland the  equivalent to the forever popular, versatile little red swiss army knife.  
Smart Cart, Heat & Wind Shield for optimum gas combustion and operator protection, a optional swing over stainless steel cooking plate and BBQ and even the optional up to 25kg Meat Rotisserie.
The KTT – Teepee Water Boiler & Heat  exchanger is in the wings. This will enable people in remote and problematic places to help themselves from char production (for all sorts of uses), and cooking, boiling and BBQing etc.  The greatest benefit will be when people in emergency situations can produce clean, healthy filtered water by  combining the various grades and sizes of clean chars as filtration medium.  Biochar Water Filtration systems as the well designed, built, trialled, demonstrated and proven by Josh Kearns and his team of Aqsolutions  
https://www.aqsolutions.org as  Ecological Transition Engineering defines the path to sustainability.
We combine work as productive fun leading to sustainability
Frank again

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of d.michael.shafer@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 4:39 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Frank,

 

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

 

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo

Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

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On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Geoff Thomas
 

First you gotta catch the bugger, building something to catch and direct all the heat is going to cost a multiple of the cost of your kiln, then you have to figure what you can do with it, - heat can be used to boil water and the steam to run a generator, but you have very little need for electricity unless your vehicle uses electricity so you can recharge it, - probably 5 years to be able to do that and will use other technology to catch the heat, based on perhaps thermo couple technology - you don’t want to get into using pyrolisis gases because they are too dirty, - the technology to filter them is expensive, time constraining and currently subject to enormous maintenance costs unless you have a fixed location.
Whatever, the heat of combustion by biolife etc will be the same, just slower, so it is not your problem, - if you can cook some sausages etc. or heat some shower water, that puts you way ahead, the wood would have heated/oxidised anyway, the difference is you made some Biochar, - the which would not have happened, so you are already streets ahead because that natural process, the which is of a magnitude several times what the human race is doing, cycles all it’s carbon back. - what you are doing and everybody that doesn’t listen to the Fussbuckets. (I use buckets instead of budgets to exaggerate the scale) is sipping into that enormous flow of returning CO2 to the atmosphere to replace some of the excess from clear felling and fossil fuel mining, the which has added so much, so incredibly much that we are in danger of making our own planet unlivable for US.
Having studied this stuff since the 1970’s and seen so many different analisees, I can confidently say that if we can divert 10% of the natural carbon return cycle to carbon sequestration, All our problems will be resolved within the lifetimes of many on this list.
Really, 1% is Big, don’t let someone who demands 20% stop you, just invite them to do what they want themselves, and let you get on with your 1%.

What most of the puritans that demand you can’t do anything except how they say do not understand, is that to get 20% efficiency you will have to spend more than 20 times as much in most cases, so in the big opportunity areas, - like crop burning, their demands kill the whole thing.
I really think that this reality needs repeating again and again and again until the armchair “experts” understand the consequences of what they demand, - no carbon sequestrated, - yes they say they do “BUT” they don’t understand at a visceral level, so their intellect dominates their common sense.

The place for more efficiency is in the big cities, there is a waste problem that can be turned into an asset, there they should focus where the hard problems are and efficiencies justified.
Hope you find that supportive Michael, huge thunderstorm coming so I should send this before the power goes.

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 9 Dec 2020, at 3:38 pm, d.michael.shafer@... wrote:

Frank,

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart
61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
Social iconSocial iconSocial icon

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate. 
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon. 

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond. 

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) 
and 
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). 

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/





Paul S Anderson
 

Geoff,

 

In different words, I am supportive of your comments that pyrolysis of  even 1% of yearly world biomass growth solve the climate problem.  My calculations are in Box 2 of Section V of my white paper at www.woodgas.energy/resources   on
Climate Intervention with Biochar..

 

[Extract]

Box 2.  Available biomass supply:

     A.  “Every year, plants convert 4,500 EJ (exajoules) of solar energy and 120 Gt (gigatons) of carbon [= 439 Gt CO2] from the atmosphere into [ ~240 Gt of new] biomass – eight times as much as the global energy need.” (World Bioenergy Association (2016)).  About half of that plant growth is in oceans, and [as an assumption] about half to three-quarters of the land-based growth is inaccessible in current conditions of terrain and location, leaving 30 to 60 Gt of biomass accessible for many uses, including pyrolysis into biochar if society decides that climate change can be combated with BC&E and decides to manage the biomass.

     B.  That same document identified the annual global supply to be 56 EJ of biomass energy [about 29 Gt of biomass] in 2012, with an expected near tripling to 150 EJ by 2035 [~85 Gt of biomass].  This indicates there can be decades of increasing CDR by actively employing BC&E drawdown before we reach the planetary limit of annual biomass supply.

     C.  There are further considerations:

            1.  Much of biomass growth in…….

 

In 24 hours from now (9 AM Eastern Time – New York) I present a webinar about the entire white paper.    Free registration is at   www.greencarbonwebinar.org   

 

The BIG issue is the climate crisis and how we can use biochar to help with some serious solutions and actions.

 

Paul

 

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 1:45 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

First you gotta catch the bugger, building something to catch and direct all the heat is going to cost a multiple of the cost of your kiln, then you have to figure what you can do with it, - heat can be used to boil water and the steam to run a generator, but you have very little need for electricity unless your vehicle uses electricity so you can recharge it, - probably 5 years to be able to do that and will use other technology to catch the heat, based on perhaps thermo couple technology - you don’t want to get into using pyrolisis gases because they are too dirty, - the technology to filter them is expensive, time constraining and currently subject to enormous maintenance costs unless you have a fixed location.

Whatever, the heat of combustion by biolife etc will be the same, just slower, so it is not your problem, - if you can cook some sausages etc. or heat some shower water, that puts you way ahead, the wood would have heated/oxidised anyway, the difference is you made some Biochar, - the which would not have happened, so you are already streets ahead because that natural process, the which is of a magnitude several times what the human race is doing, cycles all it’s carbon back. - what you are doing and everybody that doesn’t listen to the Fussbuckets. (I use buckets instead of budgets to exaggerate the scale) is sipping into that enormous flow of returning CO2 to the atmosphere to replace some of the excess from clear felling and fossil fuel mining, the which has added so much, so incredibly much that we are in danger of making our own planet unlivable for US.

Having studied this stuff since the 1970’s and seen so many different analisees, I can confidently say that if we can divert 10% of the natural carbon return cycle to carbon sequestration, All our problems will be resolved within the lifetimes of many on this list.

Really, 1% is Big, don’t let someone who demands 20% stop you, just invite them to do what they want themselves, and let you get on with your 1%.

 

What most of the puritans that demand you can’t do anything except how they say do not understand, is that to get 20% efficiency you will have to spend more than 20 times as much in most cases, so in the big opportunity areas, - like crop burning, their demands kill the whole thing.

I really think that this reality needs repeating again and again and again until the armchair “experts” understand the consequences of what they demand, - no carbon sequestrated, - yes they say they do “BUT” they don’t understand at a visceral level, so their intellect dominates their common sense.

 

The place for more efficiency is in the big cities, there is a waste problem that can be turned into an asset, there they should focus where the hard problems are and efficiencies justified.

Hope you find that supportive Michael, huge thunderstorm coming so I should send this before the power goes.

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

 

On 9 Dec 2020, at 3:38 pm, d.michael.shafer@... wrote:

 

Frank,

 

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

 

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo

Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

Social icon

Social icon

Social icon

 

App Banner Image

 

App Social Buttons Image   App Social Buttons Image   

 

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate. 
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon. 

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond. 

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) 
and 
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). 

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: 
main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/

 

 

 


Gustavo Peña
 

Good morning, since I´m not an expert in producing biochar I will be very brief, since I met Paul Anderson my interest in gasifiers never stops, I have made some designs, designs that I almost never share because some of you are so professionals that will never notice my work, but for mi using a KON TIKI  kiln is almost like asking me to go to hell once in a while, burning myself is not in my agenda, the secondary effects of heating your body even twice a week will have bad results, people that use this is having a big benefit by making some biochar, but risking their own health is not a good idea.
I usually don't replied for the same reason I point in the beginning of this note, I just love to read some good comments and keep them to myself, I have a gasifier kiln design that many people is using in central america, now there is a group of american people that will finance a new prototype, if this people is trying to help me to improve my design is because I doing something in the right direction, the Covid19 has stopped for now our project but, as soon as this people come to El Salvador I will send you updated results, just to finish this note, I will never use a kiln that will risk my health not even in the name of science, check my modest design that I producing for some NGO´s in Central America, we are getting ready to make biochar from water Hyacinth, my friends in Africa have developed that 1 square meter will give us 1 kg of biochar, we will tried to replicate their experience, I don't want to keep you bored, but if you want to see some of my ideas check the attached files. 

Best regards, God bless you all.

Gustavo Peña
Inversiones Falcon
El Salvador, Centro América
Tel: (503) 2451 9605



El mié, 9 de dic. de 2020 a la(s) 06:39, Paul S Anderson (psanders@...) escribió:

Geoff,

 

In different words, I am supportive of your comments that pyrolysis of  even 1% of yearly world biomass growth solve the climate problem.  My calculations are in Box 2 of Section V of my white paper at www.woodgas.energy/resources   on
Climate Intervention with Biochar..

 

[Extract]

Box 2.  Available biomass supply:

     A.  “Every year, plants convert 4,500 EJ (exajoules) of solar energy and 120 Gt (gigatons) of carbon [= 439 Gt CO2] from the atmosphere into [ ~240 Gt of new] biomass – eight times as much as the global energy need.” (World Bioenergy Association (2016)).  About half of that plant growth is in oceans, and [as an assumption] about half to three-quarters of the land-based growth is inaccessible in current conditions of terrain and location, leaving 30 to 60 Gt of biomass accessible for many uses, including pyrolysis into biochar if society decides that climate change can be combated with BC&E and decides to manage the biomass.

     B.  That same document identified the annual global supply to be 56 EJ of biomass energy [about 29 Gt of biomass] in 2012, with an expected near tripling to 150 EJ by 2035 [~85 Gt of biomass].  This indicates there can be decades of increasing CDR by actively employing BC&E drawdown before we reach the planetary limit of annual biomass supply.

     C.  There are further considerations:

            1.  Much of biomass growth in…….

 

In 24 hours from now (9 AM Eastern Time – New York) I present a webinar about the entire white paper.    Free registration is at   www.greencarbonwebinar.org   

 

The BIG issue is the climate crisis and how we can use biochar to help with some serious solutions and actions.

 

Paul

 

 

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.energy 

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 1:45 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

First you gotta catch the bugger, building something to catch and direct all the heat is going to cost a multiple of the cost of your kiln, then you have to figure what you can do with it, - heat can be used to boil water and the steam to run a generator, but you have very little need for electricity unless your vehicle uses electricity so you can recharge it, - probably 5 years to be able to do that and will use other technology to catch the heat, based on perhaps thermo couple technology - you don’t want to get into using pyrolisis gases because they are too dirty, - the technology to filter them is expensive, time constraining and currently subject to enormous maintenance costs unless you have a fixed location.

Whatever, the heat of combustion by biolife etc will be the same, just slower, so it is not your problem, - if you can cook some sausages etc. or heat some shower water, that puts you way ahead, the wood would have heated/oxidised anyway, the difference is you made some Biochar, - the which would not have happened, so you are already streets ahead because that natural process, the which is of a magnitude several times what the human race is doing, cycles all it’s carbon back. - what you are doing and everybody that doesn’t listen to the Fussbuckets. (I use buckets instead of budgets to exaggerate the scale) is sipping into that enormous flow of returning CO2 to the atmosphere to replace some of the excess from clear felling and fossil fuel mining, the which has added so much, so incredibly much that we are in danger of making our own planet unlivable for US.

Having studied this stuff since the 1970’s and seen so many different analisees, I can confidently say that if we can divert 10% of the natural carbon return cycle to carbon sequestration, All our problems will be resolved within the lifetimes of many on this list.

Really, 1% is Big, don’t let someone who demands 20% stop you, just invite them to do what they want themselves, and let you get on with your 1%.

 

What most of the puritans that demand you can’t do anything except how they say do not understand, is that to get 20% efficiency you will have to spend more than 20 times as much in most cases, so in the big opportunity areas, - like crop burning, their demands kill the whole thing.

I really think that this reality needs repeating again and again and again until the armchair “experts” understand the consequences of what they demand, - no carbon sequestrated, - yes they say they do “BUT” they don’t understand at a visceral level, so their intellect dominates their common sense.

 

The place for more efficiency is in the big cities, there is a waste problem that can be turned into an asset, there they should focus where the hard problems are and efficiencies justified.

Hope you find that supportive Michael, huge thunderstorm coming so I should send this before the power goes.

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

 

On 9 Dec 2020, at 3:38 pm, d.michael.shafer@... wrote:

 

Frank,

 

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

 

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo

Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

www.warmheartworldwide.org  | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

Social icon

Social icon

Social icon

 

App Banner Image

 

App Social Buttons Image   App Social Buttons Image   

 

On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate. 
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon. 

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond. 

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) 
and 
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). 

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: 
main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/

 

 

 


Gustavo Peña
 

This is Gustavo from El Salvador, I´m producing electricity in a small gasifier, soon with the help of some americans I will scaleup my idea, I will write only to you, not to the group, because most of them don't take my ideas seriously, if you send me a whatsapp contact it will be easier for us to stay in touch
this is my number +503 7988 7698

Best regards

Gustavo Peña
Inversiones Falcon
El Salvador, Centro América
Tel: (503) 2451 9605



El mar, 8 de dic. de 2020 a la(s) 23:39, d.michael.shafer@... (d.michael.shafer@...) escribió:
Frank,

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
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On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


 

Dear Michael:
  You know:  they have infra red, (heat sensing) systems to locate a human out in the dark: why can't we reverse that process to trap heat electronically, for later or stored use?   

That's my thought and I'm sticking with it...

Cheers



David R Derbowka             Chief Executive Officer

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |



On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 9:39 PM d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...> wrote:
Frank,

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
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On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/


Eli Fishpaw
 


I see small electric generators such as Gustavo describes as a way to provide topper electric production for a renewable grid when consumption exceeds 0 emissions production.  These units can be grid tied, just like the photovoltaics.  With a smart grid, price of electricity can vary with availability.  When there is excess production, the price would be the lowest for both consumer and producer.  That would be the time to charge up your car and utility scale batteries.  However, when consumption exceeds 0 emissions production, we would pay small producers and charge consumers top price for uploaded electricity.  In this way a small farmer would supplement his or her income by stockpiling biomass to run during peak demand.  
 
Having said that, it depends on the infrastructure and regulatory framework to be in place to do this.  I myself use the more primitive flame cap trench method.  The reduced work of processing feedstock into small pieces is compelling.  Like Michael Shafer, my intuition was that if the fire was real hot and smoke is being avoided, I expect the methane to be consumed in flame.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Gustavo Peña [mailto:invfalcones53@...]
To: <main@biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Wed, 9 Dec 2020 07:49:54 -0600
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

This is Gustavo from El Salvador, I´m producing electricity in a small gasifier, soon with the help of some americans I will scaleup my idea, I will write only to you, not to the group, because most of them don't take my ideas seriously, if you send me a whatsapp contact it will be easier for us to stay in touch
this is my number +503 7988 7698
 
Best regards
 
Gustavo Peña
Inversiones Falcon
El Salvador, Centro América
Tel: (503) 2451 9605
 
El mar, 8 de dic. de 2020 a la(s) 23:39, d.michael.shafer@... (d.michael.shafer@...) escribió:
Frank,
 
Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.
 
Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?
 



photo  
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand
Social icon Social icon Social icon
 
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On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/

 

 

 

 

 


Frank Strie
 

In addressing the questions and inquiries about the Brand of Biochar, this very recent article and photo from Oregon highlight the scale of issues that people / society deal with when it comes to taking things to the industrial scale level:
https://www.capitalpress.com/ag_sectors/timber/forest-service-begins-making-biochar-at-wildfire-recovery-site/article_691de1b6-34bf-11eb-b393-ab6ccecca049.html
It will be fascinating to see if,  where and how such technologies will be used in Australia and New Zealand and what they will do to optimise the opportunities and needs. It is good to know that this process is now ever further developing over time.
From Biochar in Agriculture, Asphalt and Aquaculture, Beef, Construction, Dairy, … to Pyrogenic Carbon uses in Zoos, the Alphabet of Biochar and the Biochar Cascade, the Biochar Displacement Strategy is growing ever more.
Cheers
Frank again  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of David R Derbowka
Sent: Thursday, December 10, 2020 5:37 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io Group Moderators <main@biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Dear Michael:

  You know:  they have infra red, (heat sensing) systems to locate a human out in the dark: why can't we reverse that process to trap heat electronically, for later or stored use?   

 

That's my thought and I'm sticking with it...

 

Cheers

 

 

David R Derbowka             Chief Executive Officer

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 

eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |

 

 

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 9:39 PM d.michael.shafer@... <d.michael.shafer@...> wrote:

Frank,

 

Just a quick comment about a point that you make in passing but that I have to field constantly: what about all the wasted heat? Well, here's the question: Just what are you supposed to do with it in the middle of the woods? I mean, seriously, I stand around with all this heat beating off my face and ask myself with every burn, can't you think of anything useful to do with this? Now, of course, there may be smarter, more inventive folks out there, but for better or worse, I have never met them.

 

Question for all of you: What do you do with the waste heat from a forest waste burner in the midst of the forest?



photo

Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

 

Social icon

Social icon

Social icon

 

App Banner Image

 

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On Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:43 AM Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Hello Don,
I notice you wrote your comment, question and concerns as CEO of ANZBIG,  not as a  trader of various Biochar related products / by-products in the Australian market place.
You  tried to point to / or to quote some statement from 2018 by HPS of the Ithaka Institute, but can’t remember the title but stated a number of 35 years…  
If that number was actually true and not out by a decade or so, this kind of statement could very well be taken out of context.
In fact I was in contact with HPS as late as last week and we are very much in agreement of the usefulness and potential of this mobile, flexible, entrance level, proof of concept process now adopted and practiced in way over 70 countries.
Like a spate, axe, chainsaw, angle-grinder, rifle, knife, a matchstick, drip torch etc there are things to consider where, when, what is appropriate.
Kelpie Wilson in the United States has and is addressing many of the issues associated with the things of concern and considerations. The US Forest Service will have many links, papers and presentations available why the support flame cap and flame curtain kilns, even 40 foot containers that produce at the moment just 5% to 8% char/ pyrogenic carbon.

The ‘chicken & egg’ what came first question is complex and rather than trying to spent valuable time in explaining what is and what is not here and now, I will  continue with what needs to be done to get things moving forward from the micro to the macro, here on our patch, this island and beyond.

RE:
“… concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks)
and
the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char).

Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released.”



Our ‘glocal’ knowledge network (me included) are very concerns about the annually increasing, unprecedented export of unused biomass energy and releases of particulates that turn evening to red coloured sunsets and circulate earth a number of times before turning snow and glaciers black. Work is progressing, that is clear.
Sincerely
Frank Strie
Terra-Preta Developments
BIT – Biochar Initiative Tasmania and more  

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don Coyne
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 10:29 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: Biochar production is a system and staged process RE: [Biochar] Farmer who built a Kon-Tiki that was tractor mounted and fitted with spreader.

 

Hi Frank et al, 

Frank, I respect what you have done and the clever way you modified the Kon-tiki originally designed by the Japanese and modified by Hans Peter & Paul Taylor. I also think it's clever the way you worked out how to process the char to a saleable product that I'm sure brings back loyal customers. My concerns with the Kon-tiki have always been the fire risk (naked flame, sparks) and the inefficient loss of gas and heat to atmosphere (in most cases 5x the biomass to get one part char). Hans Peter mentioned in an IBI Webinar in 2018 (can't remember title) that it would take 35 years for a Kon-tiki to be carbon neutral due to the emissions being released. What are your thoughts on these matters and do you stop production or require special permit during the summer months to keep going? 

I saw that Paul Taylor & Stephen Joseph developed a hood with a chimney on it for the Kon-tiki which looked safer and perhaps more effective? My intention is not to be negative because I know it's a better way than burning off or landfilling biomass but I think it's a discussion that we need to have an industry and branding of safe and effective production and use of biochar in Australia and New Zealand. 

Chars,

Don Coyne
CEO @ ANZBIG
https://anzbig.org/