Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management #stormwater #nutrients #water


Harry Groot
 

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

Thanks,

H


Charles Hegberg
 

In the Chesapeake Bay some are using Biochar as part of bio reactors and to enhance swales and ditches. Basically linear bio reactors 

 Charles H. Hegberg, President

reGENESIS Consulting Services, LLC

Infinite Solutions, L3C

256 Frederick Street

Hanover, PA 17331

410-218-1408 (m)

 

U.S. Biochar Initiative Board Member

USBI Biochar 2018 Conference (Past Chair)

 

"Promoting the Sustainable Production and Use of Biochar"

 

www.biochar-us.org

@USbiochar

Facebook US Biochar Initiative 

 

 

 

 


On Feb 12, 2021, at 10:34 AM, Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:


Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

Thanks,

H


ALAN PAGE
 

Hi Harry,
This is a situation where the terminology may be getting in the way of the actual question or use. 
Biochar is / should be best used to describe fully charged nutrient sharing media that is going to be directly used in soils.
Your question is about the efficacy of using empty charcoal as a filter for water coming off farm fields (as I got from your message), although you were also asking about other water management areas as well. You mention then using the "biochar" in ag field applications, which is the point at which it is appropriate to call the char additions as biochar. This is one of the highest uses of charcoal that I know of and should become a global standard practice to use locally produced char that has been conditioned to function well as an uptake and retention vehicle for local nutrient flows. There are many reasons why this is not now done, but you question is timely and appropriate.

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst has done some studies of these questions. I have included Dr. Stephen Herbert as a contact person for such questions. I am sure that others on this list will have other sources.

Alan C. Page©, Ph.D., Research Forester
Green Diamond Systems©
125 Blue Meadow Road
Belchertown, MA 01007

Phone: 413-323-4401
Cell: 413-883-9642


Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐

On Friday, February 12, 2021 10:33 AM, Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

Thanks,

H


Stephen Joseph
 

Dear Harry

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:
Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

Thanks,

H


Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

Stephen

 

Very interesting

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb.

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3),
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H


Robert Lehmert
 


I highly recommend reading Biomass Controls' fine booklet that covers this with clarity and authority.


https://documentcloud.adobe.com/link/track?uri=urn:aaid:scds:US:b57f9ea0-390c-4269-941c-c981cfe29498

 Acknowledgements................................................................................................................................................ 2

An Introduction to Pyrolysis, Biochar, and Biochar Production.......................................................................... 3

The History of Biochar............................................................................................................................................ 4

Biochar Properties.................................................................................................................................................. 5

Pyrolysis Conditions......................................................................................................................................... 5

Yield and Fixed Carbon Content................................................................................................................... 5

Nutrient Concentration................................................................................................................................... 5

pH..................................................................................................................................................................... 6

Surface Area and Adsorption Capacity......................................................................................................... 6

Uses of Biochar....................................................................................................................................................... 7

Activated Carbon Substitution....................................................................................................................... 7

Precursor to Activated Carbon................................................................................................................ 7

Wastewater Purification ............................................................................................................................ 7

Stormwater Remediation................................................................................................................................ 8

Odor Control.................................................................................................................................................... 9

Soil Amendment.............................................................................................................................................. 9

Solid Waste Management............................................................................................................................. 10

Landfill Leachate Remediation .............................................................................................................. 10

Organic Solid Waste Composting Additives........................................................................................ 10

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction......................................................................................................... 11

Carbon Stability...................................................................................................................................... 11

Carbon Sequestration............................................................................................................................ 12

Biochar uses in Food and Medicine............................................................................................................. 13

Infrastructure Applications............................................................................................................................ 13

Biochar and Human Waste.................................................................................................................................. 14

The Safety of Biochar Production and Use......................................................................................................... 15

Further Research................................................................................................................................................... 17

Conclusion............................................................................................................................................................ 18

Work Cited............................................................................................................................................................ 19

Appendix............................................................................................................................................................... 23


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Tomaso

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.
You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 

Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Very interesting

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb.

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3),
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H


Tomaso Bertoli - CISV
 

Stephen

 

Thanks for the more detailed explanation about cation and anion capacity

 

Industrially “produced” and “commercialized” biochar has a high price … but many (auto) produce biochar at much lower perceived cost (discounting one’s own labor)

 

Therefore promoting and valuing the NPK adsorption capacity of untreated char is in a different market \ mindset from the one you are pursuing

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: sabato 13 febbraio 2021 21:26
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.

You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

 

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 


Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Very interesting

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb.

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3),
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Tomaso

it is interesting when we talk to farmers in Australia.  Most dont want to make it themselves but to buy it.  If you can provide a biochar based fertiliser of animal feed char that makes them a profit they probably will pay up to 30% over a based fertiliser cost if they can see an improvement in their soils as well as yields.

We are working on a really neat organic high N and P fertiliser usign  an invasive species of fish (carp) that has taken over our rivers.  They are being culled and then hydrolysed.  The company i work with mixes minerals and biochar with the extract to make a great fertiliser.

There are many ways to make cost effective biochar based fertilisers.

Regards
Stephen

On Mon, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:33 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Thanks for the more detailed explanation about cation and anion capacity

 

Industrially “produced” and “commercialized” biochar has a high price … but many (auto) produce biochar at much lower perceived cost (discounting one’s own labor)

 

Therefore promoting and valuing the NPK adsorption capacity of untreated char is in a different market \ mindset from the one you are pursuing

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: sabato 13 febbraio 2021 21:26
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.

You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

 

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 


Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Very interesting

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb.

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3),
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H


Tom Miles
 

Stephen.

 

A fish fertilizer company here has been adding biochar for the last few years with fantastic results for the vegetable growers. Their challenge is finding suppliers with consistent quality at reasonable prices.     

 

Tom

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph
Sent: Monday, February 15, 2021 12:20 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

it is interesting when we talk to farmers in Australia.  Most dont want to make it themselves but to buy it.  If you can provide a biochar based fertiliser of animal feed char that makes them a profit they probably will pay up to 30% over a based fertiliser cost if they can see an improvement in their soils as well as yields.

 

We are working on a really neat organic high N and P fertiliser usign  an invasive species of fish (carp) that has taken over our rivers.  They are being culled and then hydrolysed.  The company i work with mixes minerals and biochar with the extract to make a great fertiliser.

 

There are many ways to make cost effective biochar based fertilisers.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Mon, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:33 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Thanks for the more detailed explanation about cation and anion capacity

 

Industrially “produced” and “commercialized” biochar has a high price … but many (auto) produce biochar at much lower perceived cost (discounting one’s own labor)

 

Therefore promoting and valuing the NPK adsorption capacity of untreated char is in a different market \ mindset from the one you are pursuing

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: sabato 13 febbraio 2021 21:26
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.

You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

 

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 


Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Very interesting

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb.

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3),
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H


Geoff Thomas
 

One of the first questions friends asked me after seeig the Doug Pow videos is “how do we incorporate that in our feed”

Talking today with a pellett manufactuter, (for Cows,) he maintained that small grains like charcoal would cause his mixing augers to block up.

Has anybody experience with auguring Char with  whatever, (eg Molases) or other modes of mixing/feeding , cows with Biochar/charcoal/other mixtures?

First the seed, then watering it, then spreading the seeds. 
Cheers,
Geoff.

On 16 Feb 2021, at 6:20 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote

Hi Tomaso

it is interesting when we talk to farmers in Australia.  Most dont want to make it themselves but to buy it.  If you can provide a biochar based fertiliser of animal feed char that makes them a profit they probably will pay up to 30% over a based fertiliser cost if they can see an improvement in their soils as well as yields.

We are working on a really neat organic high N and P fertiliser usign  an invasive species of fish (carp) that has taken over our rivers.  They are being culled and then hydrolysed.  The company i work with mixes minerals and biochar with the extract to make a great fertiliser.

There are many ways to make cost effective biochar based fertilisers.

Regards
Stephen

On Mon, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:33 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Thanks for the more detailed explanation about cation and anion capacity

 

Industrially “produced” and “commercialized” biochar has a high price … but many (auto) produce biochar at much lower perceived cost (discounting one’s own labor)

 

Therefore promoting and valuing the NPK adsorption capacity of untreated char is in a different market \ mindset from the one you are pursuing

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: sabato 13 febbraio 2021 21:26
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.

You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

 

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 


Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation 

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen 

 

Very interesting 

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process 

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb. 

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3), 
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and 
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] 

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H





Stephen Joseph
 

Hi geoff

The companies I work with do this all the time.  You need to pretreat the wood/straw with minerals and then pyrolyse and then crush into a powder.  Note the smaller the particle the faster it will work in the animal's stomache. One manufacture made a liquid slurry with some molasses and sprayed onto the silage. None of the people I work with have had issues.

Regards
Stephen

On Tue, Feb 16, 2021 at 8:23 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
One of the first questions friends asked me after seeig the Doug Pow videos is “how do we incorporate that in our feed”

Talking today with a pellett manufactuter, (for Cows,) he maintained that small grains like charcoal would cause his mixing augers to block up.

Has anybody experience with auguring Char with  whatever, (eg Molases) or other modes of mixing/feeding , cows with Biochar/charcoal/other mixtures?

First the seed, then watering it, then spreading the seeds. 
Cheers,
Geoff.

On 16 Feb 2021, at 6:20 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote

Hi Tomaso

it is interesting when we talk to farmers in Australia.  Most dont want to make it themselves but to buy it.  If you can provide a biochar based fertiliser of animal feed char that makes them a profit they probably will pay up to 30% over a based fertiliser cost if they can see an improvement in their soils as well as yields.

We are working on a really neat organic high N and P fertiliser usign  an invasive species of fish (carp) that has taken over our rivers.  They are being culled and then hydrolysed.  The company i work with mixes minerals and biochar with the extract to make a great fertiliser.

There are many ways to make cost effective biochar based fertilisers.

Regards
Stephen

On Mon, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:33 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Thanks for the more detailed explanation about cation and anion capacity

 

Industrially “produced” and “commercialized” biochar has a high price … but many (auto) produce biochar at much lower perceived cost (discounting one’s own labor)

 

Therefore promoting and valuing the NPK adsorption capacity of untreated char is in a different market \ mindset from the one you are pursuing

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: sabato 13 febbraio 2021 21:26
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.

You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

 

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 


Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation 

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen 

 

Very interesting 

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process 

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb. 

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3), 
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and 
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] 

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H





Geoff Thomas
 

Many Thanks Stephen, sounds good.

On 17 Feb 2021, at 7:26 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

Hi geoff

The companies I work with do this all the time.  You need to pretreat the wood/straw with minerals and then pyrolyse and then crush into a powder.  Note the smaller the particle the faster it will work in the animal's stomache. One manufacture made a liquid slurry with some molasses and sprayed onto the silage. None of the people I work with have had issues.

Regards
Stephen

On Tue, Feb 16, 2021 at 8:23 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
One of the first questions friends asked me after seeig the Doug Pow videos is “how do we incorporate that in our feed”

Talking today with a pellett manufactuter, (for Cows,) he maintained that small grains like charcoal would cause his mixing augers to block up.

Has anybody experience with auguring Char with  whatever, (eg Molases) or other modes of mixing/feeding , cows with Biochar/charcoal/other mixtures?

First the seed, then watering it, then spreading the seeds. 
Cheers,
Geoff.

On 16 Feb 2021, at 6:20 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote

Hi Tomaso

it is interesting when we talk to farmers in Australia.  Most dont want to make it themselves but to buy it.  If you can provide a biochar based fertiliser of animal feed char that makes them a profit they probably will pay up to 30% over a based fertiliser cost if they can see an improvement in their soils as well as yields.

We are working on a really neat organic high N and P fertiliser usign  an invasive species of fish (carp) that has taken over our rivers.  They are being culled and then hydrolysed.  The company i work with mixes minerals and biochar with the extract to make a great fertiliser.

There are many ways to make cost effective biochar based fertilisers.

Regards
Stephen

On Mon, Feb 15, 2021 at 10:33 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen

 

Thanks for the more detailed explanation about cation and anion capacity

 

Industrially “produced” and “commercialized” biochar has a high price … but many (auto) produce biochar at much lower perceived cost (discounting one’s own labor)

 

Therefore promoting and valuing the NPK adsorption capacity of untreated char is in a different market \ mindset from the one you are pursuing

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: sabato 13 febbraio 2021 21:26
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Hi Tomaso

 

Biochar is much more expensive than the minerals in the enrich version in the Australian context.  Most biochrs here (except for SIMCOA sell for over $ Aus1000/tonne.  Even in China in the large plants it sells for over $600/tonne.

You can buy most minerals in bulk for less than this.

 

But we know for increase anion exchange capacity you need to add minerals and/or acidify.  See Joseph 


Limits to Dihydrogen Incorporation into Electron Sinks Alternative to Methanogenesis in Ruminal Fermentation 

Joseph S., Kammann C. I., Shepherd J. G., Conte P., Schmidt H-P., N. Hagemann, A. M. Rich, C. E. Marjo, J. Allan, P. Munroe, D.R.G. Mitchell, S. Donne, K. Spokas and E. R. Graber (2017) Microstructural and associated chemical changes during the composting of a high temperature biochar: Mechanisms for nitrate, phosphate and other nutrient retention and release . STOTEN , 618, 1210–1223

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 9:30 PM Tomaso Bertoli - CISV <tomaso.bertoli@...> wrote:

Stephen 

 

Very interesting 

 

Have you studied the efficacy of just biochar without the enrichment that probably increases significantly the cost of the process 

 

200 kg of chipped hemp fibre were used as the feedstock to produce the enriched biochar. Hemp was chosen as a biochar feedstock due to its porous structure enhancing its ability to adsorb. 

  • 20 kg of hematite(Fe2O3), 
  • 20 kg of melanterite (FeSO4·7H2O) and 
  • 20 kg of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] 

were mixed into a slurry using 60–70 L of water and combined with the feedstock prior to pyrolysis.

 

Tomaso

 

Da: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> Per conto di Stephen Joseph
Inviato: venerdì 12 febbraio 2021 22:01
A: main@biochar.groups.io
Oggetto: Re: [Biochar] Need Help with Biochar in ag/water management

 

Dear Harry

 

This is a paper we published that may be of use to you.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:34 AM Harry Groot <harry@...> wrote:

Received an inquiry from a Lake States SWCD interested in the potential role bichar could play in ag drainage management. Specifically, the nutrients moving in those systems. Can anyone point me to published research on the topic, or direct me to anyone working in the ag-water space, specifically on how biochar may be able to mitigate nutrient runoff concerns?

 

I assume recycling the nutrient rich char back into the soil would be of interest...or should be...so experience or research in that practice would be useful, too.

 

Thanks,

 

H