IBI funding


Kathleen Draper
 

I'm happy to share some exciting news: IBI has been awarded a game-changing 5 year grant from the WOKA Foundation for capacity building. More details to be announced soon, but suffice to say we anticipate big changes in the biochar space thanks to their generosity. We will be hiring a few key staff in the near future, but in the meantime, I am interested in your thoughts on what types of things are most needed to help scale the industry (keeping in mind IBI is not a research institution) quickly and sustainably. 


John Webster
 
Edited

Marketing, marketing, marketing. Messaging focused entirely on "regenerative" opportunities provided with biochar. Biochar is beyond sustainable, it is regenerative. We need practical messaging to bring awareness to consumers who will then support biochar practices and production with their purchasing decisions.

Capacity is out there. It can and will scale. Without consumers (agricultural, industrial, government, residential) to purchase the biochar, where are we?

This is fantastic news! Thank you for sharing.


-John
GO Biochar


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi kathleen

Well done.

Educating the public and training people how to choose appropriate biochars and biochar/fertiliser mixtures plus the proper use of wood vinegar and how to apply them to gain maximum benefit.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 10:35 PM Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:
I'm happy to share some exciting news: IBI has been awarded a game-changing 5 year grant from the WOKA Foundation for capacity building. More details to be announced soon, but suffice to say we anticipate big changes in the biochar space thanks to their generosity. We will be hiring a few key staff in the near future, but in the meantime, I am interested in your thoughts on what types of things are most needed to help scale the industry (keeping in mind IBI is not a research institution) quickly and sustainably. 


Susan Klinker
 

Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 
Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 


Hugh McLaughlin
 

Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,

The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.

Regards,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:


Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 
Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 


Geoff Thomas
 

Kathleen and all.

What I personally would like to see is a rudimentary certification that separates the Charcoal  “Biochar”  sellers from the real biochar sellers, it is a problem that will always plague our industry, and always bring bad publicity, particularly from fossil fuel funded researchers, if not dealt with.

I am involved with my local Community markets, plagued with sellers who go to community markets with Coles throwaways, or stuff imported from thousands of Km away, frozen, etc, and try to pass it off as fresh and local,  etc. as people who go to markets would reasonably expect to find there. 

As a respected member of the market committee I instituted an Accreditation scheme, people  with vege, etc. stalls could apply to become Accredited, - all they had to do is fill in my form, in Australia a Statutary Declaration, (att.) and have it witnessed by a JP. (reputed person).
America, and any country invaded by the English empire, or so influenced, will have such a form, - based on the law of Torts, ‘A has a duty to B, to take care', - other countries may have similiar.
This is usually very flexible and inexpensive, and the content of the form also usually very flexible.

Such a scheme for Biochar Sellers, would rely on such a signed declaration, - the which usually  requires going to a respected person in the local economy but is also legally binding.

I would think such a low bar 'authority to sell’, carefully worded,  - eg. att.  would completely protect the IBI from any possibility of legal action so as I found, is very in-expensive to institute and manage.

Starters in the business would have to pay a low money - $10. to $20. annual fee, based on their signed declaration, for which they would receive a certificate, - 'IBI limited licence', or such, I charged my stall holders nothing and laminated their certificate also, but over the internet they would have to do that themselves, and businesses value less what they get for free,   but are reluctant to gamble..

I have received positive legal advice, and quite a large number of signees, most of whom claim their vegetable business does attract significantly more customers.

This idea would cost the IBI very little, and very little maintenance, and would allow the IBI to change the requirements as scurrilous folk seek to avoid their anual $20. fee, very easily. 

Money for jam, therefore I hope the IBI will be generous as small starters need Low deposits but big companies later on can be charged much more for more services provided.

Thing is, - keep it simple, reject pure charcoal from being sold as “Biochar”, whether it is originating from Pyrolisis sources or not, - think of the future of the Industry.

see att, below.

Cheers, Geoff Thomas, Australia.



 

On 1 May 2021, at 1:02 pm, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <wastemin1@...> wrote:

Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,

The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.

Regards,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:


Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 
Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 


Rick Wilson
 

Biocharists, 

If we were to start with a white sheet of paper to decide how to  characterize (chemically, physically) biochar (which I agree with Hugh we should),  shouldn't we start with defining what the applications for biochar are?  Wouldn’t what you measure, depend on what you are using it for?  Consider:
  • Asphalt blending.  Biochar can improve the mechanical properties so it lasts longer (fatigue, ductility)
  • Bulding materials (physical strength, insulation factor)
  • Soil remediation. Binding of heavy metals (sorption properties)
  • Stabilizing soil organic matter - building (sorption measure of ability to stabilize carbon exudates)
  • Plant growth stimulation (pH, nitrate sorption, size dimensions as they impact water infiltration, plant available water)
  • Feeding dairy cows and beef cattle to improve yield (methane retention)
  • …. and all the other applications described in the book “Burn”, and emerging applications..
Only after you decide what the applications are so you know what to measure, then figure out how to best measure it (method)?

Rick Wilson


On Apr 30, 2021, at 8:02 PM, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <wastemin1@...> wrote:

Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,

The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.

Regards,

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:


Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 
Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 


Paul S Anderson
 

To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,

 

1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)

 

2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at   psander@...  ).

 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,

 

The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.

 

Regards,

 

Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

 

On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 

 

PR Campaign to drive market demand:

  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )

Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 

 

Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 

 

Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)

 

Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 

 

Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 


Rick Wilson
 

Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    
It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?
Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone, and it will happen?

Rick






On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,
 
1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)
 
2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).
 
<image001.png>
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,
 
The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.
 
Regards,
 
Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
 
On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 

Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 



Benoit Lambert
 

Dear biochar and biogeotherapist friends,

There is a tendency to think biochar is not flying high yet because it is not characterized enough or proved enough. If that was how markets really work, many products in agriculture would have disappeared a long time ago, especially if their negative side effects are to be considered. They have not.  The advantages of cover crops have been known for decades, yet the practice is still not generalized. Regenerative practices finally putting science into agriculture is only emerging. Rodale’s Regenerative and Organic 2018 new label invites farmers to work with nature, not against it, and, to avoid making everyone sick. It took 50 years, and, it is barely starting (see Gabe Brown’s book Dirt to Soil, his educational organisation Understanding Ag., Gabe said positive things about biochar during his Congress audition, February 28).

I agree with Paul, we should go at the new market, carbon sequestration.  IPCC and all international scientific organisations have recognized biochar has one of the best ways for the urgently needed carbon dioxide removal, for carbon sinks. It is a new market, with no ennemies. It is a bit like IT when it started, the first days of internet. In Canada the CO2 ton is at 40 CAD, planning to get to 170 by 2030. That should help biochar a lot. Biochar uses in materials is in my view way underestimated, and, surely, much simpler than uses in soils and as animal feeding. It works in cold asphalt where we can store lots of GtCO2—including in equivalence non carbon dioxide GHG, we emit 55 GtCO2 a year, but this number will have to go down massively and rapidly if we are to survive on this planet (for now about half goes in the atmosphere and half in oceans/soils/biomass). What cannot be reduced and what has been accumulated (1000 GtCO2) will have to be captured from the carbon cycle and stored. Combined with removal certificates, asphalt and concrete can get us going on a big scale. 

We should also insist that biochar is not just a new material, it is managing and valuing old ones, organic waste. Albert and Kathleen talk about it in Burn. In a warming world, this is a very big deal. We just cannot continue burying organic wastes the way we do or let it rot. We have to slow down Earth’s exhaling. PyCCS is the way to do that, and, it has stability no other nature-based solution has. Labile carbon becomes recalcitrant to decomposition. Biochar is a powerful negative emission technology for biogeotherapy, for regenerative development has the UN says. Biochar participates to « using life as a geological healing force », biogeotherapy. With no-till agriculture and cover crops, holistic grazing management, and reforestation, it is one of the best and financially feasible climate solutions.

I agree with Rick, helping startups to get going is probably the best way for IBI to be useful. My experience with starting a biochar business is that you have to make profits before you even get a phone. It is hell. Obviously the new interest and commitments for net-zero changes the game, it will help. New optimism is allowed. 

The Australia and New-Zealand biochar initiative has published this paper showing 8 return on investment in less than one year using biochar. How this is not enough to convince the market is beyond my understanding. 

 

Biochar participates to an emerging more holistic science, to a fight for a new carbon economy, and, it is part of a rising biogeotherapy diplomacy. 




Benoit in Québec

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com
555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 
Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444



Le 1 mai 2021 à 01:04, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    
It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?
Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone, and it will happen?

Rick






On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,
 
1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)
 
2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).
 
<image001.png>
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,
 
The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.
 
Regards,
 
Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
 
On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 

Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 




Benoit Lambert
 

Dear biochar and biogeotherapist friends,

There is a tendency to think biochar is not flying high yet because it is not characterized enough or proved enough. If that was how markets really work, many products in agriculture would have disappeared a long time ago, especially if their negative side effects are to be considered. They have not.  The advantages of cover crops have been known for decades, yet the practice is still not generalized. Regenerative practices finally putting science into agriculture is only emerging. Rodale’s Regenerative and Organic 2018 new label invites farmers to work with nature, not against it, and, to avoid making everyone sick. It took 50 years, and, it is barely starting (see Gabe Brown’s book Dirt to Soil, his educational organisation Understanding Ag., Gabe said positive things about biochar during his Congress audition, February 28).

I agree with Paul, we should go at the new market, carbon sequestration.  IPCC and all international scientific organisations have recognized biochar has one of the best ways for the urgently needed carbon dioxide removal, for carbon sinks. It is a new market, with no ennemies. It is a bit like IT when it started, the first days of internet. In Canada the CO2 ton is at 40 CAD, planning to get to 170 by 2030. That should help biochar a lot. Biochar uses in materials is in my view way underestimated, and, surely, much simpler than uses in soils and as animal feeding. It works in cold asphalt where we can store lots of GtCO2—including in equivalence non carbon dioxide GHG, we emit 55 GtCO2 a year, but this number will have to go down massively and rapidly if we are to survive on this planet (for now about half goes in the atmosphere and half in oceans/soils/biomass). What cannot be reduced and what has been accumulated (1000 GtCO2) will have to be captured from the carbon cycle and stored. Combined with removal certificates, asphalt and concrete can get us going on a big scale. 

We should also insist that biochar is not just a new material, it is managing and valuing old ones, organic waste. Albert and Kathleen talk about it in Burn. In a warming world, this is a very big deal. We just cannot continue burying organic wastes the way we do or let it rot. We have to slow down Earth’s exhaling. PyCCS is the way to do that, and, it has stability no other nature-based solution has. Labile carbon becomes recalcitrant to decomposition. Biochar is a powerful negative emission technology for biogeotherapy, for regenerative development has the UN says. Biochar participates to « using life as a geological healing force », biogeotherapy. With no-till agriculture and cover crops, holistic grazing management, and reforestation, it is one of the best and financially feasible climate solutions.

I agree with Rick, helping startups to get going is probably the best way for IBI to be useful. My experience with starting a biochar business is that you have to make profits before you even get a phone. It is hell. Obviously the new interest and commitments for net-zero changes the game, it will help. New optimism is allowed. 

The Australia and New-Zealand biochar initiative has published this paper showing 8 return on investment in less than one year using biochar. How this is not enough to convince the market is beyond my understanding. 

 

Biochar participates to an emerging more holistic science, to a fight for a new carbon economy, and, it is part of a rising biogeotherapy diplomacy. 



Benoit in Québec

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com
555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 
Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444



Le 1 mai 2021 à 01:04, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    
It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?
Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone, and it will happen?

Rick






On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,
 
1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)
 
2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).
 
<image001.png>
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 10:02 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding
 
[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...] 
Kathleen and all of the IBI decision makers,
 
The lack of a credible way of measuring biochar properties and evaluating appropriateness and "quality" for a range of applications has been a chronic and enduring criticism of the current biochar marketplace. I have studied this particular challenge and there are real improvements that can and should be made. I would ask that a program be developed to address this situation and fix it. If it does not happen under this grant, it will likely never be attempted and the market doubt will persist and fester. I will contribute what I know, but it has to feed into a program that leads to real change. Remarking that the IBI Standards allow for modification does not address the problem that change is too little and too slow.
 
Regards,
 
Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE
 
On Friday, April 30, 2021, 7:28:47 PM EDT, Susan Klinker <suzklink@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Kathleen, Thats great news!  Here are my thoughts on what's needed to scale up the bio-char industry. 
 
PR Campaign to drive market demand:
  • Educational Outreach within the Agricultural sector including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the Public sector, including incentives for use and test plots.
  • Educational Outreach within the schools to increase understanding of soil health in younger generations.
  • Marketing to the General Public, including education on how to use biochar in backyards.
  • Mass publicity sharing amazing success stories of biochar re-generation of soil health toward climate change.
  • Creative messaging through social media and younger generations (FUN! Tik Tok viral storm! )
Lobbying Legislators for ongoing funding support to solve specific local problems, especially water conservation and areas suffering from desertification. 
 
Philanthropic Funding for further capacity building in the form of jobs & equipment for scaled up distribution in the private and non-profit sectors. 
 
Collaborative Partnerships bringing together multiple organizations to solve specific social & environmental issues. (Universities, etc)
 
Non-profit support to help educate and assist diverse populations to properly adopt, use, and understand bio-char successfully. Workshops, films, hands on support with design and product application.  (Americorp, etc) 
 

Subsidized distribution in the early days of scaling up the industry. 

 




Kathleen Draper
 

Hello all - Many thanks for the suggestions! As I said more information on the grant will be forthcoming hopefully next week. (We need to have the press release reviewed by the funder.)

Just to manage some expectations, we don't have a blank sheet to work from. We wrote a proposal focusing on capacity building which would enable IBI to hire a few key employees, one of which will be focused on Development so that IBI can become sustainable, similar to Susan K's suggestion. I agree with Stephen wholeheartedly about education being key. I would love to see a prioritized list of the most needed education; to what stakeholders (which buyers/users - small holder farmers, composters, sellers, policy makers, climate activists, corporations focused on net zero, etc.), what platforms work best and most cost effectively, what topics are most critical, how do we train more biochar educators, etc. etc. etc. 

I also agree with Hugh that properties, standards, testing methods are all in need of a refresh. We included this in our proposal. And I agree with Rick that it is important to understand the end use before the relevant properties for testing can be identified. 

It is important to keep in mind that IBI is an international organization so lobbying at a national or regional level is not within our scope. This is what USBI, ANZ and the EBIC are focusing on. We will however be able to increase our interaction and participation with international organizations. For the last several years, all of those activities have been done on a volunteer basis. We are also not a trade organization. Although we aim to help scale the biochar industry, we have a wide variety of other stakeholders. 

The interest in biochar is intensifying rapidly on many levels. I've had conversations with some very interesting organizations looking to help the biochar industry in different ways. One of them is considering starting a biochar accelerator for start ups as Rick mentioned. I think this could be amazing, but I personally don't think it falls within IBI's scope, but we will no doubt help where feasible. There are an increasing number of accelerators focusing on climate solutions and I've spoken to a few teams that are very focused on biochar. 

I am confident that 2021 will be a pivotal year for biochar.
Cheers, Kathleen


Ron Larson
 

Kathleen and list

Congratulations on message below.  See some further biochar progression thoughts below your message.  Apologies for length.

On May 1, 2021, at 6:12 AM, Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:

Hello all - Many thanks for the suggestions! As I said more information on the grant will be forthcoming hopefully next week. (We need to have the press release reviewed by the funder.)

Just to manage some expectations, we don't have a blank sheet to work from. We wrote a proposal focusing on capacity building which would enable IBI to hire a few key employees, one of which will be focused on Development so that IBI can become sustainable, similar to Susan K's suggestion. I agree with Stephen wholeheartedly about education being key. I would love to see a prioritized list of the most needed education; to what stakeholders (which buyers/users - small holder farmers, composters, sellers, policy makers, climate activists, corporations focused on net zero, etc.), what platforms work best and most cost effectively, what topics are most critical, how do we train more biochar educators, etc. etc. etc. 

I also agree with Hugh that properties, standards, testing methods are all in need of a refresh. We included this in our proposal. And I agree with Rick that it is important to understand the end use before the relevant properties for testing can be identified. 

It is important to keep in mind that IBI is an international organization so lobbying at a national or regional level is not within our scope. This is what USBI, ANZ and the EBIC are focusing on. We will however be able to increase our interaction and participation with international organizations. For the last several years, all of those activities have been done on a volunteer basis. We are also not a trade organization. Although we aim to help scale the biochar industry, we have a wide variety of other stakeholders. 

The interest in biochar is intensifying rapidly on many levels. I've had conversations with some very interesting organizations looking to help the biochar industry in different ways. One of them is considering starting a biochar accelerator for start ups as Rick mentioned. I think this could be amazing, but I personally don't think it falls within IBI's scope, but we will no doubt help where feasible. There are an increasing number of accelerators focusing on climate solutions and I've spoken to a few teams that are very focused on biochar. 

I am confident that 2021 will be a pivotal year for biochar.
Cheers, Kathleen

Continuation of theme of tasks and opportunities for IBI

Last night I just barely beat the deadline for a USDA questionnaire on things to do for CDR generally.  I think more than 4000 response to 17 questions in 4 main categories (Example - #3 was on wildfires).  Biochar fits all 4 areas and probably aall 17.queations.  I decided to only tell them of things not seen in the other 6 responses.  I am not proud of my rush writing below - but do think the seven biochar ideas below should also be on your list of topics to study and stress.  The mein change from last night’s original is. bold-underline emphasis placed on 7 biochar items that I consider undervalued or understudied.


USDA policy team; I. write as an individual active in biochar since before biochar received its present name in 2007. I am a co-founder of USBI - the United States Biochar Initiative. This represents only my own view- as I only learned of this reply opportunity late today. I have read through the 6 responses (given at the end for others); and I endorse all 6. There are excellent resources given there. 

1.  The most important action favoring biochar ever occurred only this month - release of the first instructions for the $100 million Elon Musk X-Prize. I personally believe that a biochar entry could win this prize. - because biochar. is doing much better than its competition in the last year or so. So I recommend you bring this large dollar amount into your planning. Perhaps even go so far as to become an official supporter (of course you can't enter.}

2. i recommend following the biochar efforts of China. They are.certainly the world leader it is critical that USDA be a leader in catchup.

3. It is widely stated that biochar costs something like $100. - $200 per tonne (and a larger number if counting in CO2 units). This is a great error. Biochar must most usually be. considered as an investment, not a cost. The critical number should be payback time in years. Many papers are showing this as little as 1 year. Of course, it can be much more - but there usually is an almost guaranteed increase in NPP . I predict the average will soon be. agreement on a 50% improvement. Terra Preta soils have 300-400% NPP increase today - after perhaps 1000 years. 

4. I estimate that biochar as an industry is growing at about a 2-year doubling time. Any technical paper more than a few years old should be treated with suspicion. The only technical paper given in the 6 previous cites by Amonette. et al Is to be trusted. But it deals with a research agenda - and biochar is ready for more, 

5.. As an example, I would add AI - Artificial Inteligence as something that USDA should be pushing in all 4 of your policy areas. I know only one technical biochar paper on that. Clearly the huge number of permutations of chars, soils, species, weather, etc will benefit from your support for biochar AI. 

6. USDA has I know worked together with USDOE on simple energy aspects of biochar. I suggest that you should support projects that promise to combine heat and power (CHP). biocha,r and energy storage. Solar PV and wind will always be cheaper than bioelectricity - but systems with biochar are dispatchable way.to have badly needed CDR - maybe even cheaper than PV - given carbon subsidies. 


7. I've run out of time. Lastly, please include the 17 UN SDGs in your planning. Biochar covers all 1, in my analyses of this topic.


Prior 6.submisssions.  Listed in order of most uses of the term “biochar”. (Good search engine at this site)

: 1. Harry Groat. Next Generation Woods, inc. sunrise@.... Attachment: ' Integrated biochar research: A roadmap” "Amonette, James E” .

2. Jeffrey LeBlanc, April. 4 Attachment answered 3 policy questions in the bioenergy category See. https://www.denaliwater.com/denali-technologies/ 

3. March 25,. Jeff Waldon jwaldon@... 6 pertinent direct recommendations on. Company. letterhead

4. March 25. Matt Delaney independent contractor. 5 pages of detailed answers to each USFS question http://delaneyforestry.com/biochar/

 5. March 24. Michael Rains. (Former USFS- #2) Couldn’t find an email addresss Lengthy strong wildfire document with emphasis on biochar

6. April 11, Lon Otterby. Oregon Sierra Club Shorter version of Rains document Couldn’t find email address 


The original of the above and thousands others is at.


Ron


Paul S Anderson
 

Rick,

 

See below:

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:05 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding

 

Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    

It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?

 

[PSA>>]   “PROVEN???”   by whom and for whom?   Even permanence is questioned by Stipe and others.  Many decision makers and probably most of the general public are blissfully unaware of what is biochar, its benefits and limitations, and what it represents or COULD represent about carbon  removal.  

 

Among ourselves, we are believers regarding the specialties of each of us, being about plant growth, soil, biota, production , feedstocks, and the less direct topic of carbon dioxide removal and storage CDRS).  

 

Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone,

[PSA>>] Yes,

and it will happen?

[PSA>>]   Not with a lukewarm telling of the biochar story. 

 

We do not even have any resistance to the distortions about the role of BECCS.  

 

For example, I question whether  even half of the biochar community (the readers of this discussion group) are well informed about what is BECCS and its role in the projections of climate change and why biochar is soooooo much better.   If WE do not know, then why would others care?

 

To help clarify the position of biochar among the CDRS technologies in an objective, even neutral way, in mid-Feb I put out a document and a video to help clarify this issue.   I do not remember receiving more than one comment about that.  Such a message should be strong from the IBI (and the regionals and national biochar organizations.

 

The document and video are available at  www.woodgas.energy/resources   Title of:

Understanding Carbon Dioxide Removal and Storage (CDRS) [2021-02-18]   Video   |   Paper

 

Too few of us see biochar in its role for the politically hot (pun intended) issue of needing solutions regarding climate change.   This past December (2020) I put out a white paper  about   “Climate Intervention  with  Biochar” (at that same website) and announced it.    How to reach GIGATONNES per year  of carbon dioxide removal with biochar that actually pays its own way.   Again, minimal to zero discussion.  

 

Oh shucks!!!   I did not send the items to a peer reviewed journal, to suck up more of my time and to have delays of month and possibly not even be published/ released by now.   My invitations to others (most logically the biochar specialists) to participate regarding biochar and climate have not brought in any contacts.  

 

So, I put forth the suggestion that the IBI should have a more active role about biochar and climate.   And the response is almost silence except to be questioned about  what would the IBI do about biochar and climate.      My reply:  Do ANYTHING, because that would be more than what is evident thus far.     I thank Rick for his response which has prompted this reply.

 

Note:   The USBI has made contact (Tom Miles is a key link person) to make come comments to the US government officials looking  at  policies about responses / actions about the climate crisis.     I hope that this is fruitful, but repeated contacts again and again and again is what gets results.   That is what lobbyists get paid to do.   And now the IBI has secured some funding.    

 

The tasks are not easy.   Best wishes.

 

Paul 

 

Rick

 

On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

 

To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,

 

1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)

 

2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).

  

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Rick Wilson
 

Paul, I did watch your video and thought it was very helpful, I am sorry I did not comment.  

Perhaps It's hard for me to gauge how important it is getting the word out for BECCS.  (Because I know it)

What I do know is that the private market for biochar carbon credit exists.  For supplies into CA, both Oregon and Pacific Biochar have went through the audit process.
Next week I am buying a truck load of biochar that comes with the credits, which are about $75 per ton of biochar.  Private companies are paying the toll. 
A market is developing and functioning!

So I would not get discouraged by naysayers. 
People who don’t believe in science and facts have their own motivations (science fact denial has contributed to the US having so many Covid deaths) .
On a large scale, you will never get everyone to agree, and support you.

Note that $75 per ton of biochar, which I thought was quite high, is not enough by itself to motivate someone to build biochar capacity.

I am looking forward to IBI progress getting the word out, and being very focused on what the value in uses are.  I do believe there are niches that can be filled economically.
In California, its access to feedstock tipping fees, assuming you have access to the material collected by the waste haulers. 

For those of us that want to advance biochar, we have bills to pay.  For instance in my case, health insurance for my wife and I is around $20,000 per year, and my property taxes are about the same.  So before I have had anything to eat, I have to shell out $40,000 per year, which is more than a minimum wage job would pay. 
Like almost everyone, the requirement for me to satisfy even my basic needs, limits my ability to take risks and work on what I care about. 

This is why I think its so important to organizing not only around clear messaging re applications (IBI), rigorous biochar analytics (a get a $$ grant for Hugh), but also how do we support local entrepreneurs, with $$ or the skills to raise $$, who know the local opportunities on the ground and can act.

I naturally gravitate to the Capitalist model for supporting entrepreneurs, like the Chicago Quantum exchange does by example. 

But its also clear that perhaps it is the poor people in the world that could bring our hopes for biochar to fruition. 

Its not my area of expertise, but I am aware of the amazing outcomes of Microfinance, and how the poorest of people end up being the lowest credit risk. 
Mohammad Yunus won the Nobel Peac prize for his discoveries re Microfinance for the poor in 2006.


Perhaps a model to use to advance - finance Stove production globally?

Rick

On May 1, 2021, at 9:28 AM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Rick,
 
See below:
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:05 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding
 
Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    
It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?
 
[PSA>>]   “PROVEN???”   by whom and for whom?   Even permanence is questioned by Stipe and others.  Many decision makers and probably most of the general public are blissfully unaware of what is biochar, its benefits and limitations, and what it represents or COULD represent about carbon  removal.   
 
Among ourselves, we are believers regarding the specialties of each of us, being about plant growth, soil, biota, production , feedstocks, and the less direct topic of carbon dioxide removal and storage CDRS).  
 
Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone,
[PSA>>] Yes,
and it will happen?
[PSA>>]   Not with a lukewarm telling of the biochar story. 
 
We do not even have any resistance to the distortions about the role of BECCS.  
 
For example, I question whether  even half of the biochar community (the readers of this discussion group) are well informed about what is BECCS and its role in the projections of climate change and why biochar is soooooo much better.   If WE do not know, then why would others care?
 
To help clarify the position of biochar among the CDRS technologies in an objective, even neutral way, in mid-Feb I put out a document and a video to help clarify this issue.   I do not remember receiving more than one comment about that.  Such a message should be strong from the IBI (and the regionals and national biochar organizations.
 
The document and video are available at  www.woodgas.energy/resources   Title of:
Understanding Carbon Dioxide Removal and Storage (CDRS) [2021-02-18]   Video   |   Paper
 
Too few of us see biochar in its role for the politically hot (pun intended) issue of needing solutions regarding climate change.   This past December (2020) I put out a white paper  about   “Climate Intervention  with  Biochar” (at that same website) and announced it.    How to reach GIGATONNES per year  of carbon dioxide removal with biochar that actually pays its own way.   Again, minimal to zero discussion.  
 
Oh shucks!!!   I did not send the items to a peer reviewed journal, to suck up more of my time and to have delays of month and possibly not even be published/ released by now.   My invitations to others (most logically the biochar specialists) to participate regarding biochar and climate have not brought in any contacts.  
 
So, I put forth the suggestion that the IBI should have a more active role about biochar and climate.   And the response is almost silence except to be questioned about  what would the IBI do about biochar and climate.      My reply:  Do ANYTHING, because that would be more than what is evident thus far.     I thank Rick for his response which has prompted this reply.
 
Note:   The USBI has made contact (Tom Miles is a key link person) to make come comments to the US government officials looking  at  policies about responses / actions about the climate crisis.     I hope that this is fruitful, but repeated contacts again and again and again is what gets results.   That is what lobbyists get paid to do.   And now the IBI has secured some funding.    
 
The tasks are not easy.   Best wishes.
 
Paul  
 
Rick
 
On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:
 
To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,
 
1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)
 
2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).
  
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 


K McLean
 

Rick,

With a $0.10 pair tongs, African women are making 400g - 1+kg of char every day.  The biochar passes Hugh McLaughlin's "No Soap Test",  Maize planted four weeks ago in Malawi with this biochar charged with human urine is already ready looking much healthier than the control maize.  I want to get this tested at a university, institute or some other organization that can do quality testing at my expense.  Please provide recommendations.

Hundreds of millions of families cook over open fires.  All of them could do this.

Kevin

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 1:38 PM Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, I did watch your video and thought it was very helpful, I am sorry I did not comment.  

Perhaps It's hard for me to gauge how important it is getting the word out for BECCS.  (Because I know it)

What I do know is that the private market for biochar carbon credit exists.  For supplies into CA, both Oregon and Pacific Biochar have went through the audit process.
Next week I am buying a truck load of biochar that comes with the credits, which are about $75 per ton of biochar.  Private companies are paying the toll. 
A market is developing and functioning!

So I would not get discouraged by naysayers. 
People who don’t believe in science and facts have their own motivations (science fact denial has contributed to the US having so many Covid deaths) .
On a large scale, you will never get everyone to agree, and support you.

Note that $75 per ton of biochar, which I thought was quite high, is not enough by itself to motivate someone to build biochar capacity.

I am looking forward to IBI progress getting the word out, and being very focused on what the value in uses are.  I do believe there are niches that can be filled economically.
In California, its access to feedstock tipping fees, assuming you have access to the material collected by the waste haulers. 

For those of us that want to advance biochar, we have bills to pay.  For instance in my case, health insurance for my wife and I is around $20,000 per year, and my property taxes are about the same.  So before I have had anything to eat, I have to shell out $40,000 per year, which is more than a minimum wage job would pay. 
Like almost everyone, the requirement for me to satisfy even my basic needs, limits my ability to take risks and work on what I care about. 

This is why I think its so important to organizing not only around clear messaging re applications (IBI), rigorous biochar analytics (a get a $$ grant for Hugh), but also how do we support local entrepreneurs, with $$ or the skills to raise $$, who know the local opportunities on the ground and can act.

I naturally gravitate to the Capitalist model for supporting entrepreneurs, like the Chicago Quantum exchange does by example. 

But its also clear that perhaps it is the poor people in the world that could bring our hopes for biochar to fruition. 

Its not my area of expertise, but I am aware of the amazing outcomes of Microfinance, and how the poorest of people end up being the lowest credit risk. 
Mohammad Yunus won the Nobel Peac prize for his discoveries re Microfinance for the poor in 2006.


Perhaps a model to use to advance - finance Stove production globally?

Rick

On May 1, 2021, at 9:28 AM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Rick,
 
See below:
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:05 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding
 
Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    
It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?
 
[PSA>>]   “PROVEN???”   by whom and for whom?   Even permanence is questioned by Stipe and others.  Many decision makers and probably most of the general public are blissfully unaware of what is biochar, its benefits and limitations, and what it represents or COULD represent about carbon  removal.   
 
Among ourselves, we are believers regarding the specialties of each of us, being about plant growth, soil, biota, production , feedstocks, and the less direct topic of carbon dioxide removal and storage CDRS).  
 
Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone,
[PSA>>] Yes,
and it will happen?
[PSA>>]   Not with a lukewarm telling of the biochar story. 
 
We do not even have any resistance to the distortions about the role of BECCS.  
 
For example, I question whether  even half of the biochar community (the readers of this discussion group) are well informed about what is BECCS and its role in the projections of climate change and why biochar is soooooo much better.   If WE do not know, then why would others care?
 
To help clarify the position of biochar among the CDRS technologies in an objective, even neutral way, in mid-Feb I put out a document and a video to help clarify this issue.   I do not remember receiving more than one comment about that.  Such a message should be strong from the IBI (and the regionals and national biochar organizations.
 
The document and video are available at  www.woodgas.energy/resources   Title of:
Understanding Carbon Dioxide Removal and Storage (CDRS) [2021-02-18]   Video   |   Paper
 
Too few of us see biochar in its role for the politically hot (pun intended) issue of needing solutions regarding climate change.   This past December (2020) I put out a white paper  about   “Climate Intervention  with  Biochar” (at that same website) and announced it.    How to reach GIGATONNES per year  of carbon dioxide removal with biochar that actually pays its own way.   Again, minimal to zero discussion.  
 
Oh shucks!!!   I did not send the items to a peer reviewed journal, to suck up more of my time and to have delays of month and possibly not even be published/ released by now.   My invitations to others (most logically the biochar specialists) to participate regarding biochar and climate have not brought in any contacts.  
 
So, I put forth the suggestion that the IBI should have a more active role about biochar and climate.   And the response is almost silence except to be questioned about  what would the IBI do about biochar and climate.      My reply:  Do ANYTHING, because that would be more than what is evident thus far.     I thank Rick for his response which has prompted this reply.
 
Note:   The USBI has made contact (Tom Miles is a key link person) to make come comments to the US government officials looking  at  policies about responses / actions about the climate crisis.     I hope that this is fruitful, but repeated contacts again and again and again is what gets results.   That is what lobbyists get paid to do.   And now the IBI has secured some funding.    
 
The tasks are not easy.   Best wishes.
 
Paul  
 
Rick
 
On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:
 
To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,
 
1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)
 
2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).
  
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 


Kim Chaffee
 

Hi Benoit, Paul, Rick, et al.,
Thanks for your comments.  I think that the reason many of us got onto the biochar train in the first place was for its potential climate benefits. 
Helping biochar startup businesses survive the ‘valley of death’ seems like a natural function for USBI and IBI.  Every new biochar business helps to scale biochar, which helps the climate.
Benoit, could you send us a link to the ANZIBiochar paper that shows a one year payback?  Thanks.
Kim



On May 1, 2021, at 8:12 AM, Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:

Hello all - Many thanks for the suggestions! As I said more information on the grant will be forthcoming hopefully next week. (We need to have the press release reviewed by the funder.)

Just to manage some expectations, we don't have a blank sheet to work from. We wrote a proposal focusing on capacity building which would enable IBI to hire a few key employees, one of which will be focused on Development so that IBI can become sustainable, similar to Susan K's suggestion. I agree with Stephen wholeheartedly about education being key. I would love to see a prioritized list of the most needed education; to what stakeholders (which buyers/users - small holder farmers, composters, sellers, policy makers, climate activists, corporations focused on net zero, etc.), what platforms work best and most cost effectively, what topics are most critical, how do we train more biochar educators, etc. etc. etc. 

I also agree with Hugh that properties, standards, testing methods are all in need of a refresh. We included this in our proposal. And I agree with Rick that it is important to understand the end use before the relevant properties for testing can be identified. 

It is important to keep in mind that IBI is an international organization so lobbying at a national or regional level is not within our scope. This is what USBI, ANZ and the EBIC are focusing on. We will however be able to increase our interaction and participation with international organizations. For the last several years, all of those activities have been done on a volunteer basis. We are also not a trade organization. Although we aim to help scale the biochar industry, we have a wide variety of other stakeholders. 

The interest in biochar is intensifying rapidly on many levels. I've had conversations with some very interesting organizations looking to help the biochar industry in different ways. One of them is considering starting a biochar accelerator for start ups as Rick mentioned. I think this could be amazing, but I personally don't think it falls within IBI's scope, but we will no doubt help where feasible. There are an increasing number of accelerators focusing on climate solutions and I've spoken to a few teams that are very focused on biochar. 

I am confident that 2021 will be a pivotal year for biochar.
Cheers, Kathleen


Rick Wilson
 

Hi Kevin, this is fantastic development!  Congratulations!!

If you want to do trials, perhaps UC Davis Russel Ranch may have interest.  Davis is generally considered the top Agriculture school in the world.


If you want to do biochar characterization, perhaps Cornell could steer you and endorse the results.  I don’t have connections there.

If it were me, I would buy the farmer a smart phone, and service for a year.
  • Have he or she take photos of the crop as it develops.  Take a video of the biochar production process.
  • Ask the farmer to have someone describe what they did (application rates, incorporation) on video.
  • Take photos and videos of the final production.  Take. Yield data from a treated and untreated row (count maize, or number of baskets of maize)
  • Video and photo the yield (baskets) 
  • Interview the local community leader talk about the success and capture that endorsement on video.
Stitch this together in a short video.  Put it into low resolution, so that it can be shared. (Perhaps my son can help)

I don’t know the farmer culture in Africa, but in the US if you want to convince a farmer to do something, show him what his neighbor is doing.

Rick


On May 1, 2021, at 11:43 AM, K McLean <kmclean56@...> wrote:

Rick,

With a $0.10 pair tongs, African women are making 400g - 1+kg of char every day.  The biochar passes Hugh McLaughlin's "No Soap Test",  Maize planted four weeks ago in Malawi with this biochar charged with human urine is already ready looking much healthier than the control maize.  I want to get this tested at a university, institute or some other organization that can do quality testing at my expense.  Please provide recommendations.

Hundreds of millions of families cook over open fires.  All of them could do this.

Kevin

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 1:38 PM Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Paul, I did watch your video and thought it was very helpful, I am sorry I did not comment.  

Perhaps It's hard for me to gauge how important it is getting the word out for BECCS.  (Because I know it)

What I do know is that the private market for biochar carbon credit exists.  For supplies into CA, both Oregon and Pacific Biochar have went through the audit process.
Next week I am buying a truck load of biochar that comes with the credits, which are about $75 per ton of biochar.  Private companies are paying the toll. 
A market is developing and functioning!

So I would not get discouraged by naysayers. 
People who don’t believe in science and facts have their own motivations (science fact denial has contributed to the US having so many Covid deaths) .
On a large scale, you will never get everyone to agree, and support you.

Note that $75 per ton of biochar, which I thought was quite high, is not enough by itself to motivate someone to build biochar capacity.

I am looking forward to IBI progress getting the word out, and being very focused on what the value in uses are.  I do believe there are niches that can be filled economically.
In California, its access to feedstock tipping fees, assuming you have access to the material collected by the waste haulers. 

For those of us that want to advance biochar, we have bills to pay.  For instance in my case, health insurance for my wife and I is around $20,000 per year, and my property taxes are about the same.  So before I have had anything to eat, I have to shell out $40,000 per year, which is more than a minimum wage job would pay. 
Like almost everyone, the requirement for me to satisfy even my basic needs, limits my ability to take risks and work on what I care about. 

This is why I think its so important to organizing not only around clear messaging re applications (IBI), rigorous biochar analytics (a get a $$ grant for Hugh), but also how do we support local entrepreneurs, with $$ or the skills to raise $$, who know the local opportunities on the ground and can act.

I naturally gravitate to the Capitalist model for supporting entrepreneurs, like the Chicago Quantum exchange does by example. 

But its also clear that perhaps it is the poor people in the world that could bring our hopes for biochar to fruition. 

Its not my area of expertise, but I am aware of the amazing outcomes of Microfinance, and how the poorest of people end up being the lowest credit risk. 
Mohammad Yunus won the Nobel Peac prize for his discoveries re Microfinance for the poor in 2006.


Perhaps a model to use to advance - finance Stove production globally?

Rick

On May 1, 2021, at 9:28 AM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Rick,
 
See below:
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rick Wilson via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:05 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] IBI funding
 
Paul, what should we do to get serious about CO2 removal with biochar?    
It certainly has been proven (along with biochar ability in the soil to stabilize soil organic matter and cause its accumulation)?
 
[PSA>>]   “PROVEN???”   by whom and for whom?   Even permanence is questioned by Stipe and others.  Many decision makers and probably most of the general public are blissfully unaware of what is biochar, its benefits and limitations, and what it represents or COULD represent about carbon  removal.   
 
Among ourselves, we are believers regarding the specialties of each of us, being about plant growth, soil, biota, production , feedstocks, and the less direct topic of carbon dioxide removal and storage CDRS).  
 
Are you saying IBI just needs to tell everyone,
[PSA>>] Yes,
and it will happen?
[PSA>>]   Not with a lukewarm telling of the biochar story. 
 
We do not even have any resistance to the distortions about the role of BECCS.  
 
For example, I question whether  even half of the biochar community (the readers of this discussion group) are well informed about what is BECCS and its role in the projections of climate change and why biochar is soooooo much better.   If WE do not know, then why would others care?
 
To help clarify the position of biochar among the CDRS technologies in an objective, even neutral way, in mid-Feb I put out a document and a video to help clarify this issue.   I do not remember receiving more than one comment about that.  Such a message should be strong from the IBI (and the regionals and national biochar organizations.
 
The document and video are available at  www.woodgas.energy/resources   Title of:
Understanding Carbon Dioxide Removal and Storage (CDRS) [2021-02-18]   Video   |   Paper
 
Too few of us see biochar in its role for the politically hot (pun intended) issue of needing solutions regarding climate change.   This past December (2020) I put out a white paper  about   “Climate Intervention  with  Biochar” (at that same website) and announced it.    How to reach GIGATONNES per year  of carbon dioxide removal with biochar that actually pays its own way.   Again, minimal to zero discussion.  
 
Oh shucks!!!   I did not send the items to a peer reviewed journal, to suck up more of my time and to have delays of month and possibly not even be published/ released by now.   My invitations to others (most logically the biochar specialists) to participate regarding biochar and climate have not brought in any contacts.  
 
So, I put forth the suggestion that the IBI should have a more active role about biochar and climate.   And the response is almost silence except to be questioned about  what would the IBI do about biochar and climate.      My reply:  Do ANYTHING, because that would be more than what is evident thus far.     I thank Rick for his response which has prompted this reply.
 
Note:   The USBI has made contact (Tom Miles is a key link person) to make come comments to the US government officials looking  at  policies about responses / actions about the climate crisis.     I hope that this is fruitful, but repeated contacts again and again and again is what gets results.   That is what lobbyists get paid to do.   And now the IBI has secured some funding.    
 
The tasks are not easy.   Best wishes.
 
Paul  
 
Rick
 
On Apr 30, 2021, at 9:53 PM, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:
 
To the IBI decision makers and to all biochar enthusiasts worldwide,
 
1.  Dare to be bold, dare to be different.   Avoid “more of the same.”    Promote TRUE debate with presentations of the different points of view AND then actually have open debate back and forth.   (Not just some conferences with show and tell and go home.)
 
2.  Get serious about biochar as carbon dioxide removal and storage (CDRS).   Biochar is STORAGE.   The removal was by trees and other plants.   But biochar is the key to long term storage of removed carbon, rather than decay of biomass.  If the IBI and the biochar community do not strongly present Biochar for carbon removal, do not expect the advocates for DACS, CCE (BECCS), EW, TREES, SOMG and OCS methods of carbon REMOVAL to help us out.   To ignore CDRS is literally leaving money on the table.   I am very involved with this and volunteer to work on it with the IBI.  (Anyone wanting my inputs sooner can contact me directly at  psander@...  ).
  
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 





Tom Miles
 

Rick> I don’t know the farmer culture in Africa, but in the US if you want to convince a farmer to do something, show him what his neighbor is doing.

 

It helps but it is not assured when it comes to adoption of conservation agricultural practices. : -)

 

Tom


Rick Wilson
 

Tom, I agree that your neighbor may not be inclined to adopt your new conservation practice when the benefits are not realized for some time and it costs resource to do it.

In Kevin's case, benefits appear to present themselves immediately, in which case a farmer is more likely to take advice from his neighbor.
In the case of acidic tropical soils, I would not be surprised to find the biochar helps universally, through neutralizing ph alone, thereby rending plant nutrients more available. 

Rick

…………………………………

Slide on how pH impacts soil nutrient availability to plants




On May 1, 2021, at 2:24 PM, Tom Miles <tmiles@...> wrote:

Rick> I don’t know the farmer culture in Africa, but in the US if you want to convince a farmer to do something, show him what his neighbor is doing.
 
It helps but it is not assured when it comes to adoption of conservation agricultural practices. : -) 
 
Tom