Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch


Hugh McLaughlin
 

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin


Hugh McLaughlin
 

I forgot to attach the Smolker reprint to the first email on this issue. Here it is.

Hugh McLaughlin

On Sunday, July 11, 2021, 10:54:00 AM EDT, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:


Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin


Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 


On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin



Nando Breiter
 

Geoff,

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 




On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 


On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin



--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Dick Gallien
 

Thanks Geoff and Nando---It's an oldie from the 40's, "Seems I've heard that song before", with Harry James on trumpet. 




On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 3:28 PM Nando Breiter <nando@...> wrote:
Geoff,

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 




On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 


On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

Hello Group,

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:


They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

- Hugh McLaughlin



--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Frank Strie
 

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Geoff,

 

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

 

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 


 

 

 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

 

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?

Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”

This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

Australia.

 

 

On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

 

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

 

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

 

You can register at:

 

 

They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

 

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

 

- Hugh McLaughlin

 

 


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 



Ron Larson
 

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 




Frank Strie
 

Hello Geoff and all,
Yes I got in and as I was travelling to an important Organic Resource (Waste) meeting  during the zoom webinar I was able to listen on my car radio to what was being presented.
Whilst I had a few interruptions on way due to terrain and wireless reception / blind spots in the way, I was able to get some of the Q&A  section as well.
What was clear that a big ego on the ownership of environment and mix with cynicism and in fact very little actual (technical) knowledge and lack of facts she must be saying what some like to hear and like to believe.  …
Reality is that (I)  we (our business and likeminded)  should do what we do in the holistic, circular economy, zero waste, restoration, regeneration and renovation sense when it comes to intergenerationally responsible action. Grow the economy from the ground up, supporting life above and below ground and in the water.

It is now more than 17 years (March 2004) since I first learned about the Terra Preta topic and read the initial research report by B. Glaser, Zech etc.,
more than 14 years since I intensively work on Pyrogenic Carbon technology options at every scale,
about 7 years since we (my company) produce & use Biochar and grow things that we eat and sell as well,
a good 6 years since we began trading with biochar of FRANK’S CHAR branded products (after being lab analysis by ‘EUROFINS Umwelt Ost’  to the EBC guidelines in Germany)
and just as many years since we design and get manufactured to our plans the by now 3 models and sizes of  KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kilns,
that I am glad that our clients have enabled us to have progressed to where we are now in July 2021.
I am glad to see what the many good people involved in our discussions and meetings around the region, the country and the world have enabled through good conversation and information exchanges.
So I was not angry to hear what was being said but clearly could note that it is easy to criticise and belittle and to say no.
It is so good to know why we do what we do and how we do it  and seek to improve what / how we can do to optimise the process.
Rachael Smolker is not helping with her position to tackle the issues that need to be addressed with gusto.
So that’s all I need to say here also and especially on behalf of my 4 Grandkids and their friends.
Best regards and thanks for everybody who likes to share their ideas and information and for demonstrating in the many ways and locations what can and needs to be done.
Good work in progress
Frank again

PS: Someone may like to listen and watch to what Christer Söderberg on the Island  Mallorca Spain sa
id, what has been done so far his team is doing:  https://circlecarbon.com ; https://youtu.be/xMbREu-tNmM , someone can learn something if someone is open to learning.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas
Sent: Wednesday, July 14, 2021 11:43 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..

How did you go?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

 

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217


 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Geoff,

 

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

 

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 


 

 

 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

 

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?

Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”

This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

Australia.

 

 

On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

 

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

 

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

 

You can register at:

 

 

They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

 

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

 

- Hugh McLaughlin

 

 


-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 

 


Rick Wilson
 

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.
Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.  

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 
There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.

Rick


On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 





Ron Larson
 

Rick et al

See below.

On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.
[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.

Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.    
to yet ready for.
[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 
There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  
[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

Ron


Rick


On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 






Rick Wilson
 

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 
For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 
2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 
3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 
4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 
5)  The biochar added CEC
6) you created a magnetic field 
7) you added beneficial microbes
8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger
.
.
.

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

Rick



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Rick et al

See below.

On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.
[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.

Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.    
to yet ready for.
[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 
There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  
[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

Ron


Rick


On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 







Benoit Lambert
 

Dear group,

I listened too and… oh well same as in 2011, or close. No recognition that IBI is against cutting off virgin forests to produce biochar… so biochar gets associated with energy production using biomass broadly speaking. Not fair.

But what really got my attention is when someone asked what Ms Smolker thought of using ruminants to store carbone. He/she was referring to holistic grazing management promoted by Alan Savory and soil4climate (I am an advisory board member). What André Voisin discovered in the fifties, and Savory confirmed through his observations, la dynamique des herbages, grasses’ dynamic, is a major discovery. It is meaningful because it shows she is not interested in solutions at all.  

I am preparing an article Biogeotherapy — life as a geological healing force. Holistic grazing, regenerative ranching as they call it, is one of the 4 pillars of nature-based climate solutions with biochar, no-till & cover crops, massive reforestation. Than I have identified about 15 other nature-based solutions including blue carbon, hemp, inga, agro-forestry, etc. 

The fact Rachel had no idea what the person was referring to is very telling. She does not understand or measure how trophic chains shaped climates, how bisons were a geological force—and how big African herds are still today a local geological force.  

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com
555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 
Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Fondation Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444



Le 14 juill. 2021 à 20:35, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 
For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 
2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 
3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 
4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 
5)  The biochar added CEC
6) you created a magnetic field 
7) you added beneficial microbes
8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger
.
.
.

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

Rick



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Rick et al

See below.

On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.
[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.

Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.    
to yet ready for.
[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 
There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  
[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

Ron


Rick


On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 








Roberto Garcia
 

In  spanish we have a say: " With friends like these you do not need enemies"


El mié., 14 de jul. de 2021 a la(s) 9:09 p. m., Benoit Lambert
<biocharben@...> escribió:
Dear group,

I listened too and… oh well same as in 2011, or close. No recognition that IBI is against cutting off virgin forests to produce biochar… so biochar gets associated with energy production using biomass broadly speaking. Not fair.

But what really got my attention is when someone asked what Ms Smolker thought of using ruminants to store carbone. He/she was referring to holistic grazing management promoted by Alan Savory and soil4climate (I am an advisory board member). What André Voisin discovered in the fifties, and Savory confirmed through his observations, la dynamique des herbages, grasses’ dynamic, is a major discovery. It is meaningful because it shows she is not interested in solutions at all.  

I am preparing an article Biogeotherapy — life as a geological healing force. Holistic grazing, regenerative ranching as they call it, is one of the 4 pillars of nature-based climate solutions with biochar, no-till & cover crops, massive reforestation. Than I have identified about 15 other nature-based solutions including blue carbon, hemp, inga, agro-forestry, etc. 

The fact Rachel had no idea what the person was referring to is very telling. She does not understand or measure how trophic chains shaped climates, how bisons were a geological force—and how big African herds are still today a local geological force.  

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com
555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 
Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Fondation Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444



Le 14 juill. 2021 à 20:35, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 
For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 
2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 
3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 
4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 
5)  The biochar added CEC
6) you created a magnetic field 
7) you added beneficial microbes
8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger
.
.
.

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

Rick



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Rick et al

See below.

On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.
[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.

Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.    
to yet ready for.
[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 
There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  
[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

Ron


Rick


On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.

 

 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 








Frank Strie
 

Thank you Benoit Lambert,
…” it shows she is not interested in solutions at all”.
Your examples are matching the lazy type of protesters who just say NO and get satisfaction from blocking potential community driven conversations and solutions. We have this here in Tasmania with the decades long forest wars that have aided the fast conversion from mixed forests to simplistic artificial monoculture tree crops that now underpin an industry that pushed for by a lazy attitude to actually find intergenerational pathways. I have spent too many years trying to change it, the character of hypocrites has no limits, that locked in that religious style believe system of superiority. It is sad but so it goes.
Therefore as I commented yesterday, the fact that we work on and collaborate, continue to participate for example  in  this ‘pyrogenic carbon’ discussion group responsible pathways and with the tools at hand things change and from entrance level to appropriate industrial scale.
The children and grandchildren will get excited and motivated when we involve them in the learning and practical exploration process.
The Ökoregion Kaindorf – the EcoModelRegion Kaindorf in Austria is a shining example that works successfully to address these issues.
Their motto since 2007
: “Carbon neutral in our lifetime – what will it take”?  = “Only when we do something can we change something”.
What was initially the idea of one individual and then his 4 brothers has effected the thinking and motivated people in many part of the world by now.
As the participants in the IBI tour in June 2018 experienced the reality of this ever growing awareness of meaningful  networking in a circular economy.


Ökoregion - Startseite

https://www.oekoregion-kaindorf.at

 

Translate this page


Demonstrate what is possible and real, like the global effect of the initial Stockholm Urban Trees and Stormwater Project   is now being adopted and implemented in Towns and Cities in Australia.
Rachael Smolker’s (and that of her likeminded supporters) ignorant and arrogant attitude becomes irrelevant and meaningless when the community “get’s it”, when they see the reality of possibilities to do something for the future.
Such talk is cheap!
Quick answer

Talk is cheap!

The musician speaking with Sokoohemaa Kukua stated that talk is cheap, and people are always looking for an opportunity to destroy others even with false stories. He said people are only quick to run people down without realizing it. Such stories he lamented only destroy the reputation of others.”

In contrast  https://www.earthworm.org



   

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roberto Garcia via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 11:18 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

In  spanish we have a say: " With friends like these you do not need enemies"

 

El mié., 14 de jul. de 2021 a la(s) 9:09 p. m., Benoit Lambert

<biocharben@...> escribió:

Dear group,

 

I listened too and… oh well same as in 2011, or close. No recognition that IBI is against cutting off virgin forests to produce biochar… so biochar gets associated with energy production using biomass broadly speaking. Not fair.

 

But what really got my attention is when someone asked what Ms Smolker thought of using ruminants to store carbone. He/she was referring to holistic grazing management promoted by Alan Savory and soil4climate (I am an advisory board member). What André Voisin discovered in the fifties, and Savory confirmed through his observations, la dynamique des herbages, grasses’ dynamic, is a major discovery. It is meaningful because it shows she is not interested in solutions at all.  

 

I am preparing an article Biogeotherapy — life as a geological healing force. Holistic grazing, regenerative ranching as they call it, is one of the 4 pillars of nature-based climate solutions with biochar, no-till & cover crops, massive reforestation. Than I have identified about 15 other nature-based solutions including blue carbon, hemp, inga, agro-forestry, etc. 

 

The fact Rachel had no idea what the person was referring to is very telling. She does not understand or measure how trophic chains shaped climates, how bisons were a geological force—and how big African herds are still today a local geological force.  

 

Dr. Benoit Lambert

Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com

555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 

Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 

Membre: Fondation Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444

 



Le 14 juill. 2021 à 20:35, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

 

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

 

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 

For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 

2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 

3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 

4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 

5)  The biochar added CEC

6) you created a magnetic field 

7) you added beneficial microbes

8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger

.

.

.

 

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

 

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

 

Rick

 

 



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

 

Rick et al

 

See below.



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

 

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

 

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.

[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.



Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.  

 

to yet ready for.

[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

 

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 

There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  

[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

 

Ron

 



Rick

 



On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

 

Geoff and list;

 

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

 

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

 

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

 

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

 

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

 

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  

       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.

It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

 

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

 

Never mentioned any of the positives -  

growth in publications per month

industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)

biochar webinars per month

support by numerous Forest services and foresters

Activities in China

IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

 

Ron

 

 



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

 

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..

How did you go?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

 

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Geoff,

 

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

 

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 


 

 

 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

 

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?

Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”

This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

Australia.

 

 

On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

 

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

 

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

 

You can register at:

 

 

They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

 

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

 

- Hugh McLaughlin

 

 


-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Nadav Ziv
 

Just want to thank everybody who listened and summerized this talk. You saved many lost minutes for others.
Nadav.

בתאריך יום ה׳, 15 ביולי 2021, 05:12, מאת Frank Strie ‏<frank.strie@...>:

Thank you Benoit Lambert,
…” it shows she is not interested in solutions at all”.
Your examples are matching the lazy type of protesters who just say NO and get satisfaction from blocking potential community driven conversations and solutions. We have this here in Tasmania with the decades long forest wars that have aided the fast conversion from mixed forests to simplistic artificial monoculture tree crops that now underpin an industry that pushed for by a lazy attitude to actually find intergenerational pathways. I have spent too many years trying to change it, the character of hypocrites has no limits, that locked in that religious style believe system of superiority. It is sad but so it goes.
Therefore as I commented yesterday, the fact that we work on and collaborate, continue to participate for example  in  this ‘pyrogenic carbon’ discussion group responsible pathways and with the tools at hand things change and from entrance level to appropriate industrial scale.
The children and grandchildren will get excited and motivated when we involve them in the learning and practical exploration process.
The Ökoregion Kaindorf – the EcoModelRegion Kaindorf in Austria is a shining example that works successfully to address these issues.
Their motto since 2007
: “Carbon neutral in our lifetime – what will it take”?  = “Only when we do something can we change something”.
What was initially the idea of one individual and then his 4 brothers has effected the thinking and motivated people in many part of the world by now.
As the participants in the IBI tour in June 2018 experienced the reality of this ever growing awareness of meaningful  networking in a circular economy.


Ökoregion - Startseite

https://www.oekoregion-kaindorf.at

 

Translate this page


Demonstrate what is possible and real, like the global effect of the initial Stockholm Urban Trees and Stormwater Project   is now being adopted and implemented in Towns and Cities in Australia.
Rachael Smolker’s (and that of her likeminded supporters) ignorant and arrogant attitude becomes irrelevant and meaningless when the community “get’s it”, when they see the reality of possibilities to do something for the future.
Such talk is cheap!
Quick answer

Talk is cheap!

The musician speaking with Sokoohemaa Kukua stated that talk is cheap, and people are always looking for an opportunity to destroy others even with false stories. He said people are only quick to run people down without realizing it. Such stories he lamented only destroy the reputation of others.”

In contrast  https://www.earthworm.org



   

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roberto Garcia via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 11:18 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

In  spanish we have a say: " With friends like these you do not need enemies"

 

El mié., 14 de jul. de 2021 a la(s) 9:09 p. m., Benoit Lambert

<biocharben@...> escribió:

Dear group,

 

I listened too and… oh well same as in 2011, or close. No recognition that IBI is against cutting off virgin forests to produce biochar… so biochar gets associated with energy production using biomass broadly speaking. Not fair.

 

But what really got my attention is when someone asked what Ms Smolker thought of using ruminants to store carbone. He/she was referring to holistic grazing management promoted by Alan Savory and soil4climate (I am an advisory board member). What André Voisin discovered in the fifties, and Savory confirmed through his observations, la dynamique des herbages, grasses’ dynamic, is a major discovery. It is meaningful because it shows she is not interested in solutions at all.  

 

I am preparing an article Biogeotherapy — life as a geological healing force. Holistic grazing, regenerative ranching as they call it, is one of the 4 pillars of nature-based climate solutions with biochar, no-till & cover crops, massive reforestation. Than I have identified about 15 other nature-based solutions including blue carbon, hemp, inga, agro-forestry, etc. 

 

The fact Rachel had no idea what the person was referring to is very telling. She does not understand or measure how trophic chains shaped climates, how bisons were a geological force—and how big African herds are still today a local geological force.  

 

Dr. Benoit Lambert

Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com

555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 

Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 

Membre: Fondation Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444

 



Le 14 juill. 2021 à 20:35, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

 

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

 

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 

For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 

2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 

3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 

4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 

5)  The biochar added CEC

6) you created a magnetic field 

7) you added beneficial microbes

8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger

.

.

.

 

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

 

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

 

Rick

 

 



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

 

Rick et al

 

See below.



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

 

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

 

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.

[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.



Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.  

 

to yet ready for.

[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

 

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 

There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  

[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

 

Ron

 



Rick

 



On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

 

Geoff and list;

 

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

 

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

 

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

 

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

 

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

 

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  

       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.

It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

 

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

 

Never mentioned any of the positives -  

growth in publications per month

industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)

biochar webinars per month

support by numerous Forest services and foresters

Activities in China

IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

 

Ron

 

 



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

 

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..

How did you go?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

 

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Geoff,

 

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

 

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 


 

 

 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

 

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?

Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”

This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

Australia.

 

 

On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

 

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

 

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

 

You can register at:

 

 

They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

 

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

 

- Hugh McLaughlin

 

 


-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Geoff Thomas
 

The criticism that there are many different approaches from many different people on different soils reminds me of a time in New Zealand where the Europeans had developed a great yen for Bio-dynamic food, vegies etc, and the agriculture minister of the time, - whose name I can’t remember, - is there any thing more forgetable than an ex ministers name? - but I digress, he enthused about this wonderful new value added, market and how it offered many advantages, blah blah, concluding, “ if only we could get this witchy thing out of it”. 

Certainly I could not blame the ignorant for seeing the arcanity in Bio-dynamics, - it exists and is central to it’s success, but he could just not see that.
 - Similiarly, the diversity of different Biochar makers with their different local soils that they design around should not be seen as a negative, - it is indeed a great positive, that there are differing solutions for differing circumstance and what is more good luck, a person dealing with that particular area, wow, what a strength Biochar offers!!

This bureaucratic ONE SIZE FITS ALL mind set should be called out for the nonsense and danger it is,  - how can we answer new challenges with only old irrelevant solutions?

Cheers,  Geoff Thomas.


On 15 Jul 2021, at 11:18 am, Roberto Garcia via groups.io <rgarcia605@...> wrote:

In  spanish we have a say: " With friends like these you do not need enemies"


El mié., 14 de jul. de 2021 a la(s) 9:09 p. m., Benoit Lambert
<biocharben@...> escribió:
Dear group,

I listened too and… oh well same as in 2011, or close. No recognition that IBI is against cutting off virgin forests to produce biochar… so biochar gets associated with energy production using biomass broadly speaking. Not fair.

But what really got my attention is when someone asked what Ms Smolker thought of using ruminants to store carbone. He/she was referring to holistic grazing management promoted by Alan Savory and soil4climate (I am an advisory board member). What André Voisin discovered in the fifties, and Savory confirmed through his observations, la dynamique des herbages, grasses’ dynamic, is a major discovery. It is meaningful because it shows she is not interested in solutions at all.  

I am preparing an article Biogeotherapy — life as a geological healing force. Holistic grazing, regenerative ranching as they call it, is one of the 4 pillars of nature-based climate solutions with biochar, no-till & cover crops, massive reforestation. Than I have identified about 15 other nature-based solutions including blue carbon, hemp, inga, agro-forestry, etc. 

The fact Rachel had no idea what the person was referring to is very telling. She does not understand or measure how trophic chains shaped climates, how bisons were a geological force—and how big African herds are still today a local geological force.  

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com
555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 
Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Fondation Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444



Le 14 juill. 2021 à 20:35, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 
For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 
2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 
3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 
4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 
5)  The biochar added CEC
6) you created a magnetic field 
7) you added beneficial microbes
8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger
.
.
.

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

Rick



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Rick et al

See below.

On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.
[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.

Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.    
to yet ready for.
[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 
There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  
[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

Ron


Rick


On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

Geoff and list;

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  
       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.
It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

Never mentioned any of the positives -  
growth in publications per month
industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)
biochar webinars per month
support by numerous Forest services and foresters
Activities in China
IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

Ron



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..
How did you go?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch
 
Geoff,
 
The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker
 
In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 

 
 
 
On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:
Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?
 
It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?
Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”
This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?
 
Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.
Australia.
 
 
On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:
 
Hello Group,
 
There is a seminar this Tuesday:
 
Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
 
You can register at:
 
 
They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.
 
Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.
 
- Hugh McLaughlin
 
 

-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 









Frank Strie
 

Yes Geoff Thomas, the way you pointed this very real life scenario out is  100%.
Complex systems thinking, planning and action, rather than narrowly focused separate , individual lab-research.
The art and science of the process also includes reaction time factors that not fit into typically publicly funded short term  say  2 to 4 year research h projects.
The work continues here on my patch and any of our biochar customers and KON-TIKI-TAS Kiln clients.
Interesting times
Frank again

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas
Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2021 6:54 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

The criticism that there are many different approaches from many different people on different soils reminds me of a time in New Zealand where the Europeans had developed a great yen for Bio-dynamic food, vegies etc, and the agriculture minister of the time, - whose name I can’t remember, - is there any thing more forgetable than an ex ministers name? - but I digress, he enthused about this wonderful new value added, market and how it offered many advantages, blah blah, concluding, “ if only we could get this witchy thing out of it”. 

 

Certainly I could not blame the ignorant for seeing the arcanity in Bio-dynamics, - it exists and is central to it’s success, but he could just not see that.

 - Similiarly, the diversity of different Biochar makers with their different local soils that they design around should not be seen as a negative, - it is indeed a great positive, that there are differing solutions for differing circumstance and what is more good luck, a person dealing with that particular area, wow, what a strength Biochar offers!!

 

This bureaucratic ONE SIZE FITS ALL mind set should be called out for the nonsense and danger it is,  - how can we answer new challenges with only old irrelevant solutions?

 

Cheers,  Geoff Thomas.

 

 

On 15 Jul 2021, at 11:18 am, Roberto Garcia via groups.io <rgarcia605@...> wrote:

 

In  spanish we have a say: " With friends like these you do not need enemies"

 

El mié., 14 de jul. de 2021 a la(s) 9:09 p. m., Benoit Lambert

<biocharben@...> escribió:

Dear group,

 

I listened too and… oh well same as in 2011, or close. No recognition that IBI is against cutting off virgin forests to produce biochar… so biochar gets associated with energy production using biomass broadly speaking. Not fair.

 

But what really got my attention is when someone asked what Ms Smolker thought of using ruminants to store carbone. He/she was referring to holistic grazing management promoted by Alan Savory and soil4climate (I am an advisory board member). What André Voisin discovered in the fifties, and Savory confirmed through his observations, la dynamique des herbages, grasses’ dynamic, is a major discovery. It is meaningful because it shows she is not interested in solutions at all.  

 

I am preparing an article Biogeotherapy — life as a geological healing force. Holistic grazing, regenerative ranching as they call it, is one of the 4 pillars of nature-based climate solutions with biochar, no-till & cover crops, massive reforestation. Than I have identified about 15 other nature-based solutions including blue carbon, hemp, inga, agro-forestry, etc. 

 

The fact Rachel had no idea what the person was referring to is very telling. She does not understand or measure how trophic chains shaped climates, how bisons were a geological force—and how big African herds are still today a local geological force.  

 

Dr. Benoit Lambert

Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Inc., https://cbiochar.com

555 Ch. Réal, n° 105, 

Sutton, QC, Canada, J0E 2K0
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 

Membre: Fondation Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444

 



Le 14 juill. 2021 à 20:35, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> a écrit :

 

Ron, I believe that voluntary carbon credits will help bringing biochar into solutions for some applications.

 

The nature of biochar for soils is that it is a multifunctional amendment.  You can’t put biochar into the soil and change just one thing. 

For instance, if you see a positive growth response, it could be attributed to many possibilities, for instance. 

 

1) the soil was low in potassium and calcium which are usually found in biochar 

2) biochar added air porosity to the soil so now the microbes can breath and do their thing, and water can now flow through it 

3) you reduced the electrical potential so that nutrients can now better flow into the plant 

4). The soil was sodic so that you can now rinse out the sodium 

5)  The biochar added CEC

6) you created a magnetic field 

7) you added beneficial microbes

8) The biochar attracted UFO’s who made the plant grow bigger

.

.

.

 

And you are free to make a claim around cause and effect that you see fit, because it can’t be proven given all the possibilities. 

 

The breakthrough that is needed, the Academic Hero who has yet to emerge, will build a model - framework based on physical and chemical properties of soil and biochar and other amendments with the ability to identify where constraints are in the soil and which ones biochar or other amendments can help with. By analogy, in chemical engineering (I am one), you can predict the physical properties of materials you never tested using Group Contribution framework, and those methods work quite well.  Same for chemical kinetics.  

 

We need a group contribution method for soil and amendments. 

 

Until then we have to hope for AI like you suggest… 

 

Rick

 

 



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:09 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

 

Rick et al

 

See below.



On Jul 14, 2021, at 5:36 PM, Rick Wilson via groups.io <rick012@...> wrote:

 

Ron, great summary, thanks for sharing!

 

Re Cool Planet.  Economics were independent of the price of oil.  If the oil price went down, the RINS credit went up, and visa versa.

[RWL:  Apologies.  i vaguely recall your saying this once before.



Cool Planet failed because it could not create a large enough market for biochar.  We are still failing on this dimension.  

 

to yet ready for.

[RWL:   is there a credit amount or method that will change that?

 

Biochar is a complicated material, they are all different, where a particular one can help in soils is situational (soil challenge, plant type) dependent, it not a universal tool. 

There is not accepted guidance on where it can help and which char characteristics are important per application type or soil challenge, how to apply it, specific enough to act on with precision, and there is a divergence of opinions among advocates, which confuses the outsiders.  

[RWL:   Rachel said something similar - but that was not her main message.  With some 300 or more new publications per month, we should be solving some of that.  i think we badly need Ai = artificial intelligence.  Or is the problem so severe that AI and biochar still need more time?  

 

Ron

 



Rick

 



On Jul 13, 2021, at 8:30 PM, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:

 

Geoff and list;

 

I listened and hope to hear Frank’s thoughts also.  

 

It was much the same as other BFW material - but she willing to grant that there have been some successes -  to me,  that seemed new.   Her cites were mostly pd - and to BFW material.

 

I think about 75 on the webinar - a very friendly audience - united against all cutting of trees - i think of any kind;   moderator was supportive.

 

She got into some difficulty being against electric cars and PV.  Claimed some group (maybe Sierra Club) is proposing to cut down forests for PV.   First time I have heard that one - and doubt it.  i found a site with a similar story     

 

This was not a venue to ask questions - and I didn’t (moderator gave no names of questioners).   I didn’t hear anything strongly pro-biochar

 

She clearly is way behind on biochar progress -  except she acknowledged biochar was growing fast.  

       She said biochar was hard to find and no major producers - all back yard.  Gave a plug for Kelpie’s equipment.

It should be easy to quote from her material on her lack of real biochar knowledge.  Her cites were all old - except a new one that was unreadable.

 

Lots of time spent on Cool Planet and Mike Cheiky - with no explanation that their business plan was based on $100 oil - which happened - but later got down to $50.  now near $75.

 

Never mentioned any of the positives -  

growth in publications per month

industrial growth rate (2-year doubling time??)

biochar webinars per month

support by numerous Forest services and foresters

Activities in China

IBI and range of countries with major biochar programs

 

Ron

 

 



On Jul 13, 2021, at 7:43 PM, Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

 

Hi Frank, I was able to enroll, but not open the meeting, then again my computer is getting old..

How did you go?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

 

On 13 Jul 2021, at 10:40 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

 

Biochar: what it is and what it isn’t

Rachel Smolker

Rachel Smolker is co-director of BiofuelwatchHer work has spanned local grassroots organizing to participation in international processes, including the United Nations conventions on climate and biodiversity. She has researched, written and organized on the impacts of biofuels, bioenergy and biochar on land use, forests, biodiversity, food, people and the climate. 
She has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Michigan and worked previously as a field biologist. She lives in Vermont.

This event is part of the Forest Speakers Series, a collaboration of Climate Action Now and Save Massachusetts Forests

Register HERE for this talk
The talks are free, but registration is required for EACH meeting. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with your link for joining the event. 

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/963080281191217

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nando Breiter
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2021 6:28 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Seminar by Rachael Smolker of Biofuelwatch

 

Geoff,

 

The result of some digging about a decade ago seemed to indicate Biofuel Watch was being funded by fossil fuel interests. BFW has always doggedly pursued an agenda fueled by disinformation, undeterred by arguments or common sense. Her doctorate seems to be about dolphins, and for a PhD that bills herself as an authority on biochar, her published work on the matter is rather scant.  See https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rachel-Smolker

 

In any case, her efforts to hold back biochar adoption are not needed. The fact that it is already so hard for a biochar-based business to gain financial traction makes them completely unnecessary. 


 

 

 

On Sun, Jul 11, 2021 at 9:14 PM Geoff Thomas <wind@...> wrote:

Hi Hugh, haven’t we heard that name before?

 

It certainly contains the same dishonesty, do you want an analysis?

Other than the same nonsense by anti renewable opponents, “it is going to take too much of our precious land” (no figures provided, all sorts of hidden - unexplicated assumptions), but the almost word for word, "One gets the impression that (for some inexplicable reason) there is great interest in finding something useful to do with biochar.”

This is such a dishonest sentence, that Biochar can draw down potentially huge amounts of Carbon is dissed by calling it ‘for some inexplicable reason’ as if there was no reason when it is a life and death for the human race reason, and the attempt to sound wise and contemptuous by saying that biochar is looking for a reason, when all the things she mentions are Very good reasons, not attempts to find a reason, streuth, the woman is so obviously slimy, what is the motivation behind her supporters?

 

Cheers,

Geoff Thomas.

Australia.

 

 

On 12 Jul 2021, at 12:53 am, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <hsmclaughlin@...> wrote:

 

Hello Group,

 

There is a seminar this Tuesday:

 

Biochar: What it is and what it is not

Rachel Smolker, Ph.D.

 
Tuesday July 13th from 7:00 - 8:30 p.m.

 

You can register at:

 

 

They seem to save the seminars to be viewed later - which is another way to see Dr. Smolker's perspective.

 

Also attached is a recent opinion piece by the same. For those who want to meet the opposition of biochar, this is a place to start.

 

- Hugh McLaughlin

 

 


-- 
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Robert Lehmert
 

If anyone is still interested, the Smolker event was attended by a total of 10 people.

I imagine the speaker and the host were included in that count.


Deborah Cook
 

Oh I think there were at least 58 participants but I think several had left when I checked the count

On Thu, Jul 15, 2021 at 2:08 PM Robert Lehmert via groups.io <roblehmert=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:

If anyone is still interested, the Smolker event was attended by a total of 10 people.

I imagine the speaker and the host were included in that count.

--
Deborah Cook
781.383.6313
-------------------
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