Topics

Biochar buzz #animals #bees


Trevor Richards
 

Here in NZ, some of us biochar advocates are keen on getting animal feed trials going but we had not considered bees...


This photo was taken in a bucket of biochar following small flame cap demo for a TV new snip (4min here).
Simon tells me the bees have been landing for about a week since the char was quenched and left out.
The biomass was eucalypt branches and was mostly well cooked. There are hives nearby but there is also plenty of water about.
Any thoughts on what is attracting the bees?
Simon is planning an experiment... crushing some finer and also laying out another type of biochar.


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Trevor

They are probably attracted too some of the biopolymers and polyphenolic acids on the biochar but also  the biochar may have captured pollen.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Sep 12, 2020 at 10:01 AM Trevor Richards <trevor@...> wrote:
Here in NZ, some of us biochar advocates are keen on getting animal feed trials going but we had not considered bees...


This photo was taken in a bucket of biochar following small flame cap demo for a TV new snip (4min here).
Simon tells me the bees have been landing for about a week since the char was quenched and left out.
The biomass was eucalypt branches and was mostly well cooked. There are hives nearby but there is also plenty of water about.
Any thoughts on what is attracting the bees?
Simon is planning an experiment... crushing some finer and also laying out another type of biochar.


Hugh McLaughlin
 

List: as to bees and their diets:

I expect they were attracted to lower temperature biochars and had labile sugars due to the breakdown of C5 & C6 sugars - talking calories ala nectar.

With a reasonable characterization method for biochar, we could sort out the phenomena. Lacking that, we can only speculate. When is this situation going to be addressed by the forces that be in the biochar space?

I have written up what I know - I wish the next wave of insights better traction.

- Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

On Friday, September 11, 2020, 9:03:39 PM EDT, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Trevor

They are probably attracted too some of the biopolymers and polyphenolic acids on the biochar but also  the biochar may have captured pollen.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Sep 12, 2020 at 10:01 AM Trevor Richards <trevor@...> wrote:
Here in NZ, some of us biochar advocates are keen on getting animal feed trials going but we had not considered bees...


This photo was taken in a bucket of biochar following small flame cap demo for a TV new snip (4min here).
Simon tells me the bees have been landing for about a week since the char was quenched and left out.
The biomass was eucalypt branches and was mostly well cooked. There are hives nearby but there is also plenty of water about.
Any thoughts on what is attracting the bees?
Simon is planning an experiment... crushing some finer and also laying out another type of biochar.


Joshua Bogart
 

From my experience working with bees in the tropics. They are often atracted to high salt like animal urine. Could it be they are after the mineral in the ash portion?


On Fri, Sep 11, 2020, 9:34 PM Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <wastemin1=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
List: as to bees and their diets:

I expect they were attracted to lower temperature biochars and had labile sugars due to the breakdown of C5 & C6 sugars - talking calories ala nectar.

With a reasonable characterization method for biochar, we could sort out the phenomena. Lacking that, we can only speculate. When is this situation going to be addressed by the forces that be in the biochar space?

I have written up what I know - I wish the next wave of insights better traction.

- Hugh McLaughlin, PhD, PE

On Friday, September 11, 2020, 9:03:39 PM EDT, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:


Hi Trevor

They are probably attracted too some of the biopolymers and polyphenolic acids on the biochar but also  the biochar may have captured pollen.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Sep 12, 2020 at 10:01 AM Trevor Richards <trevor@...> wrote:
Here in NZ, some of us biochar advocates are keen on getting animal feed trials going but we had not considered bees...


This photo was taken in a bucket of biochar following small flame cap demo for a TV new snip (4min here).
Simon tells me the bees have been landing for about a week since the char was quenched and left out.
The biomass was eucalypt branches and was mostly well cooked. There are hives nearby but there is also plenty of water about.
Any thoughts on what is attracting the bees?
Simon is planning an experiment... crushing some finer and also laying out another type of biochar.


Susan
 

Would there be any salts in the char?   I know that bees are attracted to salt, and often the reason on might land on you on a hot day.  

I give mine a salt block.

Susan

On Fri, Sep 11, 2020, 7:01 PM Trevor Richards <trevor@...> wrote:
Here in NZ, some of us biochar advocates are keen on getting animal feed trials going but we had not considered bees...


This photo was taken in a bucket of biochar following small flame cap demo for a TV new snip (4min here).
Simon tells me the bees have been landing for about a week since the char was quenched and left out.
The biomass was eucalypt branches and was mostly well cooked. There are hives nearby but there is also plenty of water about.
Any thoughts on what is attracting the bees?
Simon is planning an experiment... crushing some finer and also laying out another type of biochar.