Topics

biochar Whitepaper #climate


Benoit Lambert
 


Harald,

Whitepaper: Biochar-based carbon sinks to mitigate climate change. 

Your Whitepaper does a great job at putting biochar in perspective compare to other nature-based sinks. The time has come to insist biochar has co-benefits that BECCS and other carbon dioxide removal approaches do not have. Biochar is ready for implementation now, and, indeed, can be combined and used in cascade with other bio-sourced climate solutions such as build-up of soil organic matter or planned grazing. Remarkable piece of work, and you are right, 80% of information on biochar came in recent years. Things go fast. Good work !!

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Enr., https://cbiochar.com
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444









David Yarrow
 

thank you, benoit, for making us aware of this pivotal paper from european biochar industry to advance a better, broader understanding that biochar is our best, fastest, cheapest, most natural strategy to cut the head off the greenhouse gas monster that is threatening the future of human (and much other) life on earth.  the opening paragraph states the case clearly, directly for those who can decode a few keywords.

i will read the rest in the hope it describes the complete process of how this biochar strategy works.  i certainly hope this White Paper gets wide distribution, careful reading and review, and prompts profound behavior changes by society, agriculture, forestry, and industry.  three years ago, i attempted to draft my own White Paper on this subject, and the response that my effort got amounted to a big, fat zero:

there is much more to this process than making biochar to capture carbon as a super-stable substance to pump into soil.  and there is much more to soil carbon than dead, decaying (or burnt) "organic matter."  and soil is much more than a repository for chemical substances.  making biochar all by itself certainly sucks CO2 out of atmosphere into this super-stable black carbon substance, but biochar is not a lone, isolated factor, but is just one step in a larger view of the carbon sequestration process.  

first off, plants are doing the heavy lifting to convert CO2 into complex carbohydrates – first as sugar, and then as cellulose and thousands of other forms of biomass on and in the ground.  so, any successful and wise biochar strategy must begin by the prime rule: Optimize Photosynthesis.  humans need to stop destroying, decimating and disrupting green plant ecosystems globally, and instead, expand the area of land under green plant cover.  

but just as critical is to increase the density of photosynthesis on each acre of vegetation, which means creating multi-layer, multi-story, multi-species plant ecosystems.  desertification and deforestation must be halted and reversed – which means decades of destructive operations by forestry, agriculture and land development must reverse their programs and policies to become eco-friendly and eco-restorative.  thus far, i only see weak signs these human organizations & industries like farming, logging, landscaping, and real estate management are woke up and ready to implement drastic changes in how they operate.

second, techniques and equipment to make biochar must be integrated into the things humans already do.  for example, in agriculture, huge quantities of farm and food wastes that are currently dumped, burned, rotted, or composted must be redirected into pyrolytic operations.  we need biochar technology & tools that are integrated into farming operations, such as 
1)  biochar burners that are space & water heater to enable greenhouses that grow food 12 months a year; 
2) biochar burners that can dry down fresh harvested corn, instead of expensive hydrocarbon propane; 
3) farm equipment powered by biogas / woodgas instead of gasoline & diesel.  

i keep insisting that weedy, not just woody, biomass are more useful as feedstock to make biochar that truly, fully benefits soils.  for one, wood is mostly carbon, but weeds contain carbon with nitrogen.  weedy biomass, properly pyrolyzed results in biochar that contains small, yet significant, nitrogen.  

in forestry, cutting down trees to make biochar is a bad, even wrong, idea.  rather, first priority should be to utilize wastes, including not only residues from logging & lumbering, but also, and more importantly, forest thinning for timber stand improvement to upgrade the photosynthetic efficiencies of forest ecosystems.  the entire west has the problem of excess understory growth that is fueling & feeding current wildfires whipping thru forests.  convert all that clutter & trash into char to hold water, minerals & microbes in those badly damaged soils – strategy already getting attention at the least on this listserv.

one key concern is that nitrogen is not a nutrient, but a cycle driven by bacteria.  intelligent deployment of biochar in farm soils should inoculating char with several species of bacteria that perform nitrogen cycle conversions.  a national science foundation catalog lists 250+ nitrogen-fixing microbes identified & classified; most – but not all – are bacteria.  nitrogen-fixing atmospheric of N2 is only one step in the nitrogen cycle, which includes converting ammonia to nitrates, and nitrates to more biological / organic N compounds more available & usable by plants.  biochar's unique "AEC" ability to capture & store loosely held N suggests biochar is an ideal substrate to house N-cycle microbes.

skipping over other bullet points, my prime concern is a "soil carbon multiplier effect" – recognition that adding biochar to soil initiates a cascade of carbon into multiple other forms that disburse carbon far further, more intimately into soil.  soil sequestration by biochar isn't the end of the story, but really, the beginning.  roots, microbes and other soil life move more carbon throughout soil, intimately, often invisibly.  my favored carbon multiplier effect is fungi.  white fuzz of fungal mycelium is carbon on the move thru soil, changing soil texture, structure and chemistry, making soil amenable to even more lifeforms besides roots.
BiocharMycellium5_720.jpg
this photo is a gallon jar of homemade brush biochar inoculated 30 days prior with mycorrhizal fungal spores and water – and no nutrients.  fungi dissolve & digest tar & resin residues abundant in this low temperature char to fuel & feed growth of their hyphae into masses of white mycelium threads so thick the char is disappearing like an airplane in clouds.  fungi don't eat the char, which is essentially inert.  these fungi are totally fed by hydrocarbon residues left in the char, spreading that carbon far and wide throughout the jar.

so, imagine this isn't char in a jar, but a soil matrix.  each white thread is a hollow tube pumping water and nutrients, delivering them to hungry & thirsty microbes, most so micro-tiny we can't even see them – and because they are mostly water, they're transparent, too.  they're not only invisible to sight, often they're also invisible to chemical assay – undetectable by most organic matter analyses.  

i still choke or guffaw when i read that living organisms – microbes – are only 3 to 5% of organic matter in soil.  analysis not only fails detecting these micro-carbon residues, they miss the point they are ALIVE.  they do things inside soil to transform it from inert dirt into habitat for busy, bustling, thriving communities.  those fungal mycelium are glyco-proteins that secrete & decay into sticky glues that gather mineral particles together into coherent, structured clumps ("aggregates") to thus open, loosen & aerate soil to make it easily workable, more liveable for microbes.  "glomalin" is the poster child for fungal-driven carbon movement & storage, only discovered in 1996 as a previously unknown form is "missing" carbon.  but wait, there is more......

a final note: only a few years ago, 3 retired USDA soil scientists decided to look deeper in soil that conventional "root zone" – down to 6 feet.  no one bothered to look that deep.  they found corn and other common crop plants can send carbon that deep in soil.  i'm aware some weeds (bindweed, as example) send root networks even 10 feet down into soil.  seems bindweed specializes in mining and moving Boron from deep up to soil surfaces.  Boron, a minor or trace element, is essential to move carbon around inside plants – out of leaves into roots. shoots & fruits.  where else?

and beyond roots, what about earthworms?  how do far they tunnel through soil?  how deep and how much are they moving carbon in soil?  what are synergistic interactions of biochar with earthworms?  most commercial ag lands i see in the midwest are weak or devoid of earthworm populations due to bad management practices.  what else are we missing in this sequester for carbon?

anyway, i'm not a numbers guy, but i make a wild guess that soil microbes can move & store easily 10 times more carbon into soil than ordinary, inert "organic matter" or biochar.  biosystems are frequently exponential, not linear.  to understand & optimize soil carbon sequestration will require science to study & reveal these "soil carbon multipliers."  but i should read the european biochar industry White Paper to see what further forms of carbon are included in their calculations & models.

for a green & peaceful planet,
david yarrow


On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 2:58 AM Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...> wrote:

Harald,

Whitepaper: Biochar-based carbon sinks to mitigate climate change. 

Your Whitepaper does a great job at putting biochar in perspective compare to other nature-based sinks. The time has come to insist biochar has co-benefits that BECCS and other carbon dioxide removal approaches do not have. Biochar is ready for implementation now, and, indeed, can be combined and used in cascade with other bio-sourced climate solutions such as build-up of soil organic matter or planned grazing. Remarkable piece of work, and you are right, 80% of information on biochar came in recent years. Things go fast. Good work !!

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Enr., https://cbiochar.com
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444









Benoit Lambert, PhD <benoit.lambert7@...>
 

Thank you David for these very interesting comments. I had dowloaded your white paper and… will now read it. 
Do not underestimate the influence you have on this site and other sites. Sometimes people don’t say—or don’t even remember—where the ideas they defend came from. What I see is more confidence in defending biochar to its just value in the context of natural crisis: climate, desertification, water quality and quantity, …
Best regards and congratulations for the constant and enthusiastic work!

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Enr., https://cbiochar.com
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444






Le 18 oct. 2020 à 15:27, David Yarrow <dyarrow5@...> a écrit :

thank you, benoit, for making us aware of this pivotal paper from european biochar industry to advance a better, broader understanding that biochar is our best, fastest, cheapest, most natural strategy to cut the head off the greenhouse gas monster that is threatening the future of human (and much other) life on earth.  the opening paragraph states the case clearly, directly for those who can decode a few keywords.

i will read the rest in the hope it describes the complete process of how this biochar strategy works.  i certainly hope this White Paper gets wide distribution, careful reading and review, and prompts profound behavior changes by society, agriculture, forestry, and industry.  three years ago, i attempted to draft my own White Paper on this subject, and the response that my effort got amounted to a big, fat zero:

there is much more to this process than making biochar to capture carbon as a super-stable substance to pump into soil.  and there is much more to soil carbon than dead, decaying (or burnt) "organic matter."  and soil is much more than a repository for chemical substances.  making biochar all by itself certainly sucks CO2 out of atmosphere into this super-stable black carbon substance, but biochar is not a lone, isolated factor, but is just one step in a larger view of the carbon sequestration process.  

first off, plants are doing the heavy lifting to convert CO2 into complex carbohydrates – first as sugar, and then as cellulose and thousands of other forms of biomass on and in the ground.  so, any successful and wise biochar strategy must begin by the prime rule: Optimize Photosynthesis.  humans need to stop destroying, decimating and disrupting green plant ecosystems globally, and instead, expand the area of land under green plant cover.  

but just as critical is to increase the density of photosynthesis on each acre of vegetation, which means creating multi-layer, multi-story, multi-species plant ecosystems.  desertification and deforestation must be halted and reversed – which means decades of destructive operations by forestry, agriculture and land development must reverse their programs and policies to become eco-friendly and eco-restorative.  thus far, i only see weak signs these human organizations & industries like farming, logging, landscaping, and real estate management are woke up and ready to implement drastic changes in how they operate.

second, techniques and equipment to make biochar must be integrated into the things humans already do.  for example, in agriculture, huge quantities of farm and food wastes that are currently dumped, burned, rotted, or composted must be redirected into pyrolytic operations.  we need biochar technology & tools that are integrated into farming operations, such as 
1)  biochar burners that are space & water heater to enable greenhouses that grow food 12 months a year; 
2) biochar burners that can dry down fresh harvested corn, instead of expensive hydrocarbon propane; 
3) farm equipment powered by biogas / woodgas instead of gasoline & diesel.  

i keep insisting that weedy, not just woody, biomass are more useful as feedstock to make biochar that truly, fully benefits soils.  for one, wood is mostly carbon, but weeds contain carbon with nitrogen.  weedy biomass, properly pyrolyzed results in biochar that contains small, yet significant, nitrogen.  

in forestry, cutting down trees to make biochar is a bad, even wrong, idea.  rather, first priority should be to utilize wastes, including not only residues from logging & lumbering, but also, and more importantly, forest thinning for timber stand improvement to upgrade the photosynthetic efficiencies of forest ecosystems.  the entire west has the problem of excess understory growth that is fueling & feeding current wildfires whipping thru forests.  convert all that clutter & trash into char to hold water, minerals & microbes in those badly damaged soils – strategy already getting attention at the least on this listserv.

one key concern is that nitrogen is not a nutrient, but a cycle driven by bacteria.  intelligent deployment of biochar in farm soils should inoculating char with several species of bacteria that perform nitrogen cycle conversions.  a national science foundation catalog lists 250+ nitrogen-fixing microbes identified & classified; most – but not all – are bacteria.  nitrogen-fixing atmospheric of N2 is only one step in the nitrogen cycle, which includes converting ammonia to nitrates, and nitrates to more biological / organic N compounds more available & usable by plants.  biochar's unique "AEC" ability to capture & store loosely held N suggests biochar is an ideal substrate to house N-cycle microbes.

skipping over other bullet points, my prime concern is a "soil carbon multiplier effect" – recognition that adding biochar to soil initiates a cascade of carbon into multiple other forms that disburse carbon far further, more intimately into soil.  soil sequestration by biochar isn't the end of the story, but really, the beginning.  roots, microbes and other soil life move more carbon throughout soil, intimately, often invisibly.  my favored carbon multiplier effect is fungi.  white fuzz of fungal mycelium is carbon on the move thru soil, changing soil texture, structure and chemistry, making soil amenable to even more lifeforms besides roots.
<BiocharMycellium5_720.jpg>
this photo is a gallon jar of homemade brush biochar inoculated 30 days prior with mycorrhizal fungal spores and water – and no nutrients.  fungi dissolve & digest tar & resin residues abundant in this low temperature char to fuel & feed growth of their hyphae into masses of white mycelium threads so thick the char is disappearing like an airplane in clouds.  fungi don't eat the char, which is essentially inert.  these fungi are totally fed by hydrocarbon residues left in the char, spreading that carbon far and wide throughout the jar.

so, imagine this isn't char in a jar, but a soil matrix.  each white thread is a hollow tube pumping water and nutrients, delivering them to hungry & thirsty microbes, most so micro-tiny we can't even see them – and because they are mostly water, they're transparent, too.  they're not only invisible to sight, often they're also invisible to chemical assay – undetectable by most organic matter analyses.  

i still choke or guffaw when i read that living organisms – microbes – are only 3 to 5% of organic matter in soil.  analysis not only fails detecting these micro-carbon residues, they miss the point they are ALIVE.  they do things inside soil to transform it from inert dirt into habitat for busy, bustling, thriving communities.  those fungal mycelium are glyco-proteins that secrete & decay into sticky glues that gather mineral particles together into coherent, structured clumps ("aggregates") to thus open, loosen & aerate soil to make it easily workable, more liveable for microbes.  "glomalin" is the poster child for fungal-driven carbon movement & storage, only discovered in 1996 as a previously unknown form is "missing" carbon.  but wait, there is more......

a final note: only a few years ago, 3 retired USDA soil scientists decided to look deeper in soil that conventional "root zone" – down to 6 feet.  no one bothered to look that deep.  they found corn and other common crop plants can send carbon that deep in soil.  i'm aware some weeds (bindweed, as example) send root networks even 10 feet down into soil.  seems bindweed specializes in mining and moving Boron from deep up to soil surfaces.  Boron, a minor or trace element, is essential to move carbon around inside plants – out of leaves into roots. shoots & fruits.  where else?

and beyond roots, what about earthworms?  how do far they tunnel through soil?  how deep and how much are they moving carbon in soil?  what are synergistic interactions of biochar with earthworms?  most commercial ag lands i see in the midwest are weak or devoid of earthworm populations due to bad management practices.  what else are we missing in this sequester for carbon?

anyway, i'm not a numbers guy, but i make a wild guess that soil microbes can move & store easily 10 times more carbon into soil than ordinary, inert "organic matter" or biochar.  biosystems are frequently exponential, not linear.  to understand & optimize soil carbon sequestration will require science to study & reveal these "soil carbon multipliers."  but i should read the european biochar industry White Paper to see what further forms of carbon are included in their calculations & models.

for a green & peaceful planet,
david yarrow


On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 2:58 AM Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...> wrote:

Harald,

Whitepaper: Biochar-based carbon sinks to mitigate climate change. 

Your Whitepaper does a great job at putting biochar in perspective compare to other nature-based sinks. The time has come to insist biochar has co-benefits that BECCS and other carbon dioxide removal approaches do not have. Biochar is ready for implementation now, and, indeed, can be combined and used in cascade with other bio-sourced climate solutions such as build-up of soil organic matter or planned grazing. Remarkable piece of work, and you are right, 80% of information on biochar came in recent years. Things go fast. Good work !!

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Enr., https://cbiochar.com
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444












CHANDRA SEKHAR PAUL
 

Dear David,

Thank you very much for sharing the information. It is very interesting to see fungal colonization. We are also found a similar result. However, we are focusing on nutrient solubilization from biochar by fungal colonization. We also applied bacteria to biochar media but the growth was very slow. Your idea about earthworms is very interesting. If you want I can write some plans for this aspect.


Thank you once again. 


Regards,

Paul Chandrasekhar

Doctoral Researcher

Faculty of Agrobiology, Food

and Natural Resources

Department of Agroenvironmental

Chemistry and Plant Nutrition

Office 47

Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS)

Kamýcká 129 165 00 Praha 6 - Suchdol

Prague, Czech Republic.


On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 9:28 PM David Yarrow <dyarrow5@...> wrote:
thank you, benoit, for making us aware of this pivotal paper from european biochar industry to advance a better, broader understanding that biochar is our best, fastest, cheapest, most natural strategy to cut the head off the greenhouse gas monster that is threatening the future of human (and much other) life on earth.  the opening paragraph states the case clearly, directly for those who can decode a few keywords.

i will read the rest in the hope it describes the complete process of how this biochar strategy works.  i certainly hope this White Paper gets wide distribution, careful reading and review, and prompts profound behavior changes by society, agriculture, forestry, and industry.  three years ago, i attempted to draft my own White Paper on this subject, and the response that my effort got amounted to a big, fat zero:

there is much more to this process than making biochar to capture carbon as a super-stable substance to pump into soil.  and there is much more to soil carbon than dead, decaying (or burnt) "organic matter."  and soil is much more than a repository for chemical substances.  making biochar all by itself certainly sucks CO2 out of atmosphere into this super-stable black carbon substance, but biochar is not a lone, isolated factor, but is just one step in a larger view of the carbon sequestration process.  

first off, plants are doing the heavy lifting to convert CO2 into complex carbohydrates – first as sugar, and then as cellulose and thousands of other forms of biomass on and in the ground.  so, any successful and wise biochar strategy must begin by the prime rule: Optimize Photosynthesis.  humans need to stop destroying, decimating and disrupting green plant ecosystems globally, and instead, expand the area of land under green plant cover.  

but just as critical is to increase the density of photosynthesis on each acre of vegetation, which means creating multi-layer, multi-story, multi-species plant ecosystems.  desertification and deforestation must be halted and reversed – which means decades of destructive operations by forestry, agriculture and land development must reverse their programs and policies to become eco-friendly and eco-restorative.  thus far, i only see weak signs these human organizations & industries like farming, logging, landscaping, and real estate management are woke up and ready to implement drastic changes in how they operate.

second, techniques and equipment to make biochar must be integrated into the things humans already do.  for example, in agriculture, huge quantities of farm and food wastes that are currently dumped, burned, rotted, or composted must be redirected into pyrolytic operations.  we need biochar technology & tools that are integrated into farming operations, such as 
1)  biochar burners that are space & water heater to enable greenhouses that grow food 12 months a year; 
2) biochar burners that can dry down fresh harvested corn, instead of expensive hydrocarbon propane; 
3) farm equipment powered by biogas / woodgas instead of gasoline & diesel.  

i keep insisting that weedy, not just woody, biomass are more useful as feedstock to make biochar that truly, fully benefits soils.  for one, wood is mostly carbon, but weeds contain carbon with nitrogen.  weedy biomass, properly pyrolyzed results in biochar that contains small, yet significant, nitrogen.  

in forestry, cutting down trees to make biochar is a bad, even wrong, idea.  rather, first priority should be to utilize wastes, including not only residues from logging & lumbering, but also, and more importantly, forest thinning for timber stand improvement to upgrade the photosynthetic efficiencies of forest ecosystems.  the entire west has the problem of excess understory growth that is fueling & feeding current wildfires whipping thru forests.  convert all that clutter & trash into char to hold water, minerals & microbes in those badly damaged soils – strategy already getting attention at the least on this listserv.

one key concern is that nitrogen is not a nutrient, but a cycle driven by bacteria.  intelligent deployment of biochar in farm soils should inoculating char with several species of bacteria that perform nitrogen cycle conversions.  a national science foundation catalog lists 250+ nitrogen-fixing microbes identified & classified; most – but not all – are bacteria.  nitrogen-fixing atmospheric of N2 is only one step in the nitrogen cycle, which includes converting ammonia to nitrates, and nitrates to more biological / organic N compounds more available & usable by plants.  biochar's unique "AEC" ability to capture & store loosely held N suggests biochar is an ideal substrate to house N-cycle microbes.

skipping over other bullet points, my prime concern is a "soil carbon multiplier effect" – recognition that adding biochar to soil initiates a cascade of carbon into multiple other forms that disburse carbon far further, more intimately into soil.  soil sequestration by biochar isn't the end of the story, but really, the beginning.  roots, microbes and other soil life move more carbon throughout soil, intimately, often invisibly.  my favored carbon multiplier effect is fungi.  white fuzz of fungal mycelium is carbon on the move thru soil, changing soil texture, structure and chemistry, making soil amenable to even more lifeforms besides roots.
BiocharMycellium5_720.jpg
this photo is a gallon jar of homemade brush biochar inoculated 30 days prior with mycorrhizal fungal spores and water – and no nutrients.  fungi dissolve & digest tar & resin residues abundant in this low temperature char to fuel & feed growth of their hyphae into masses of white mycelium threads so thick the char is disappearing like an airplane in clouds.  fungi don't eat the char, which is essentially inert.  these fungi are totally fed by hydrocarbon residues left in the char, spreading that carbon far and wide throughout the jar.

so, imagine this isn't char in a jar, but a soil matrix.  each white thread is a hollow tube pumping water and nutrients, delivering them to hungry & thirsty microbes, most so micro-tiny we can't even see them – and because they are mostly water, they're transparent, too.  they're not only invisible to sight, often they're also invisible to chemical assay – undetectable by most organic matter analyses.  

i still choke or guffaw when i read that living organisms – microbes – are only 3 to 5% of organic matter in soil.  analysis not only fails detecting these micro-carbon residues, they miss the point they are ALIVE.  they do things inside soil to transform it from inert dirt into habitat for busy, bustling, thriving communities.  those fungal mycelium are glyco-proteins that secrete & decay into sticky glues that gather mineral particles together into coherent, structured clumps ("aggregates") to thus open, loosen & aerate soil to make it easily workable, more liveable for microbes.  "glomalin" is the poster child for fungal-driven carbon movement & storage, only discovered in 1996 as a previously unknown form is "missing" carbon.  but wait, there is more......

a final note: only a few years ago, 3 retired USDA soil scientists decided to look deeper in soil that conventional "root zone" – down to 6 feet.  no one bothered to look that deep.  they found corn and other common crop plants can send carbon that deep in soil.  i'm aware some weeds (bindweed, as example) send root networks even 10 feet down into soil.  seems bindweed specializes in mining and moving Boron from deep up to soil surfaces.  Boron, a minor or trace element, is essential to move carbon around inside plants – out of leaves into roots. shoots & fruits.  where else?

and beyond roots, what about earthworms?  how do far they tunnel through soil?  how deep and how much are they moving carbon in soil?  what are synergistic interactions of biochar with earthworms?  most commercial ag lands i see in the midwest are weak or devoid of earthworm populations due to bad management practices.  what else are we missing in this sequester for carbon?

anyway, i'm not a numbers guy, but i make a wild guess that soil microbes can move & store easily 10 times more carbon into soil than ordinary, inert "organic matter" or biochar.  biosystems are frequently exponential, not linear.  to understand & optimize soil carbon sequestration will require science to study & reveal these "soil carbon multipliers."  but i should read the european biochar industry White Paper to see what further forms of carbon are included in their calculations & models.

for a green & peaceful planet,
david yarrow


On Sun, Oct 18, 2020 at 2:58 AM Benoit Lambert <benoit.lambert@...> wrote:

Harald,

Whitepaper: Biochar-based carbon sinks to mitigate climate change. 

Your Whitepaper does a great job at putting biochar in perspective compare to other nature-based sinks. The time has come to insist biochar has co-benefits that BECCS and other carbon dioxide removal approaches do not have. Biochar is ready for implementation now, and, indeed, can be combined and used in cascade with other bio-sourced climate solutions such as build-up of soil organic matter or planned grazing. Remarkable piece of work, and you are right, 80% of information on biochar came in recent years. Things go fast. Good work !!

Dr. Benoit Lambert
Founder and President / Fondateur et président
Cbiochar Enr., https://cbiochar.com
BioGéoThérapiste, auteur/blog https://cologie.wordpress.com 
Membre: Stratégie énergétique, biosphère et société, Genève
Reviewer/réviseur IPCC/GIEC, Working Group I (WGI), Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), in particular Chap. 5 Carbon dioxide removal methods/biochar.
Tel: 450 775 7444