Biohar and IoT


eko sb setyawan
 

Hi All,

Whether any informations about biochar application integrated with IoT (Internet of Things) ?

Regards
Eko


Ron Larson
 

Eko:   cc list

Thanks for the question.  A brand new topic for this list I’m pretty sure.  I see several reasons for your question in the Wiki article on IoT - including that the name has about the same age and complexity as “biochar”.

The term AI = Artificial Intelligence jumped out at me as one part of IoT that biochar needs more of.  I only know of one person working on the AI - biochar topic.
Quite a few soil scientists are using sophisticated electronic equipment to monitor all sorts of things related to biochar - such as priming.


I was impressed by some of things I saw associated with your own company - including advanced continuous pyrolysis equipment - which presumably runs a lot better with IoT.  Also the use of banana stalks for biochar in Indonesia..

I hope you can give an update on biochar, Indonesia, your own company and reasons for your IoT question.

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 4:19 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Whether any informations about biochar application integrated with IoT (Internet of Things) ?

Regards
Eko


eko sb setyawan
 

Hi Ron,
Thanks for the feedback. The background because precision farming I believe would be to trend in near future and we can't avoid it. Integration with internet will help the eficiency and accuracy in term to response the condition even in real time for such agriciulture practices then finally more yield/profit.

My big obsession mainly to apply biochar in palm oil plantations,since the operation of the plantation very costly and the palm oil mill have abundant of the biomass waste namely empty fruit bunch, mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell. I wrote an article about it Benefits of Palm Oil Company When Produce Biochar and finally using IoT will help a lot in the monitoring of such biochar application.

Regards
Eko




On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 9:55:22 AM GMT+7, Ronal Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


Eko:   cc list

Thanks for the question.  A brand new topic for this list I’m pretty sure.  I see several reasons for your question in the Wiki article on IoT - including that the name has about the same age and complexity as “biochar”.

The term AI = Artificial Intelligence jumped out at me as one part of IoT that biochar needs more of.  I only know of one person working on the AI - biochar topic.
Quite a few soil scientists are using sophisticated electronic equipment to monitor all sorts of things related to biochar - such as priming.


I was impressed by some of things I saw associated with your own company - including advanced continuous pyrolysis equipment - which presumably runs a lot better with IoT.  Also the use of banana stalks for biochar in Indonesia..

I hope you can give an update on biochar, Indonesia, your own company and reasons for your IoT question.

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 4:19 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Whether any informations about biochar application integrated with IoT (Internet of Things) ?

Regards
Eko


Ron Larson
 

Eko and list

Thanks for the leads on biochar and the palm oil business,  

You are a very prolific blogger - as I think you are also “Cakbentra”.  I am very impressed by your several sites.

I sense globally that biochar is doubling in scale about every 2 years.  Faster or slower in Indonesia and nearby countries that you are concentrating on?

Any other guidance for this kist?

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 9:13 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi Ron,
Thanks for the feedback. The background because precision farming I believe would be to trend in near future and we can't avoid it. Integration with internet will help the eficiency and accuracy in term to response the condition even in real time for such agriciulture practices then finally more yield/profit.

My big obsession mainly to apply biochar in palm oil plantations,since the operation of the plantation very costly and the palm oil mill have abundant of the biomass waste namely empty fruit bunch, mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell. I wrote an article about it Benefits of Palm Oil Company When Produce Biochar and finally using IoT will help a lot in the monitoring of such biochar application.

Regards
Eko




On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 9:55:22 AM GMT+7, Ronal Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


Eko:   cc list

Thanks for the question.  A brand new topic for this list I’m pretty sure.  I see several reasons for your question in the Wiki article on IoT - including that the name has about the same age and complexity as “biochar”.

The term AI = Artificial Intelligence jumped out at me as one part of IoT that biochar needs more of.  I only know of one person working on the AI - biochar topic.
Quite a few soil scientists are using sophisticated electronic equipment to monitor all sorts of things related to biochar - such as priming.


I was impressed by some of things I saw associated with your own company - including advanced continuous pyrolysis equipment - which presumably runs a lot better with IoT.  Also the use of banana stalks for biochar in Indonesia..

I hope you can give an update on biochar, Indonesia, your own company and reasons for your IoT question.

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 4:19 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Whether any informations about biochar application integrated with IoT (Internet of Things) ?

Regards
Eko



eko sb setyawan
 


Ron and List,

Yes, I use Cakbentra  in the blogger name. That's good that biochar  get more acceptance along with time.
I just go back again in the biochar after some times inactive. Previously I active follow the informations all about biochar in about 2008-2012, then start active again recently. I hope there are some big projects about about biochar rather than research in this time. As long as I know there is still very limited parties that interest with biochar in medium-large scale agriculture here, maybe Trevor in Malaysia know better in this regard. I found that Indonesia Ministry of Agriculture published biochar book in 2015 with the main objective of food security https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiq_cLa_8DvAhVrH7cAHWduBggQFjABegQIARAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fbalittanah.litbang.pertanian.go.id%2Find%2Fdokumentasi%2Flainnya%2FBuku%2520Biochar.pdf&usg=AOvVaw1MArWJ9qf4c1sd7PjW6xpT Hope this will speed up the biochar awareness and implementation in Indonesia. I think also that the pandemic also drive the internet usage everywhere and regarding IoT will be accelerated too. 

Regards
Eko

On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 12:12:57 PM GMT+7, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


Eko and list

Thanks for the leads on biochar and the palm oil business,  

You are a very prolific blogger - as I think you are also “Cakbentra”.  I am very impressed by your several sites.

I sense globally that biochar is doubling in scale about every 2 years.  Faster or slower in Indonesia and nearby countries that you are concentrating on?

Any other guidance for this kist?

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 9:13 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi Ron,
Thanks for the feedback. The background because precision farming I believe would be to trend in near future and we can't avoid it. Integration with internet will help the eficiency and accuracy in term to response the condition even in real time for such agriciulture practices then finally more yield/profit.

My big obsession mainly to apply biochar in palm oil plantations,since the operation of the plantation very costly and the palm oil mill have abundant of the biomass waste namely empty fruit bunch, mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell. I wrote an article about it Benefits of Palm Oil Company When Produce Biochar and finally using IoT will help a lot in the monitoring of such biochar application.

Regards
Eko




On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 9:55:22 AM GMT+7, Ronal Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


Eko:   cc list

Thanks for the question.  A brand new topic for this list I’m pretty sure.  I see several reasons for your question in the Wiki article on IoT - including that the name has about the same age and complexity as “biochar”.

The term AI = Artificial Intelligence jumped out at me as one part of IoT that biochar needs more of.  I only know of one person working on the AI - biochar topic.
Quite a few soil scientists are using sophisticated electronic equipment to monitor all sorts of things related to biochar - such as priming.


I was impressed by some of things I saw associated with your own company - including advanced continuous pyrolysis equipment - which presumably runs a lot better with IoT.  Also the use of banana stalks for biochar in Indonesia..

I hope you can give an update on biochar, Indonesia, your own company and reasons for your IoT question.

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 4:19 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Whether any informations about biochar application integrated with IoT (Internet of Things) ?

Regards
Eko



Ron Larson
 

   Eko and list:

1.  The biochar book thaat you cited is of course difficult to read for most on this list.   But this figure looked both familiar and not - as the no-biochar case on the left showed zero production.  



Google translation said; 
 The yield of dry shelled maize can be obtained from various dosages of fruit skin biochar cocoa on acid dry land

I wonder what percent of the worlds soils are so acidic that this impressive (infinite when you divide by zero) yield increase can be obtained. And flat after 10 tonnes/ha also seems unusual.

2. The stoves part of biochar is impressed by the stoves developed by Indonesian Dr. Mohamed Nurhuda. Do you interact?

Ron




On Mar 21, 2021, at 2:53 AM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:


Ron and List,

Yes, I use Cakbentra  in the blogger name. That's good that biochar  get more acceptance along with time.
I just go back again in the biochar after some times inactive. Previously I active follow the informations all about biochar in about 2008-2012, then start active again recently. I hope there are some big projects about about biochar rather than research in this time. As long as I know there is still very limited parties that interest with biochar in medium-large scale agriculture here, maybe Trevor in Malaysia know better in this regard. I found that Indonesia Ministry of Agriculture published biochar book in 2015 with the main objective of food security https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiq_cLa_8DvAhVrH7cAHWduBggQFjABegQIARAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fbalittanah.litbang.pertanian.go.id%2Find%2Fdokumentasi%2Flainnya%2FBuku%2520Biochar.pdf&usg=AOvVaw1MArWJ9qf4c1sd7PjW6xpT Hope this will speed up the biochar awareness and implementation in Indonesia. I think also that the pandemic also drive the internet usage everywhere and regarding IoT will be accelerated too. 

Regards
Eko
On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 12:12:57 PM GMT+7, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


Eko and list

Thanks for the leads on biochar and the palm oil business,  

You are a very prolific blogger - as I think you are also “Cakbentra”.  I am very impressed by your several sites.

I sense globally that biochar is doubling in scale about every 2 years.  Faster or slower in Indonesia and nearby countries that you are concentrating on?

Any other guidance for this kist?

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 9:13 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi Ron,
Thanks for the feedback. The background because precision farming I believe would be to trend in near future and we can't avoid it. Integration with internet will help the eficiency and accuracy in term to response the condition even in real time for such agriciulture practices then finally more yield/profit.

My big obsession mainly to apply biochar in palm oil plantations,since the operation of the plantation very costly and the palm oil mill have abundant of the biomass waste namely empty fruit bunch, mesocarp fibre and palm kernel shell. I wrote an article about it Benefits of Palm Oil Company When Produce Biochar and finally using IoT will help a lot in the monitoring of such biochar application.

Regards
Eko




On Sunday, March 21, 2021, 9:55:22 AM GMT+7, Ronal Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


Eko:   cc list

Thanks for the question.  A brand new topic for this list I’m pretty sure.  I see several reasons for your question in the Wiki article on IoT - including that the name has about the same age and complexity as “biochar”.

The term AI = Artificial Intelligence jumped out at me as one part of IoT that biochar needs more of.  I only know of one person working on the AI - biochar topic.
Quite a few soil scientists are using sophisticated electronic equipment to monitor all sorts of things related to biochar - such as priming.


I was impressed by some of things I saw associated with your own company - including advanced continuous pyrolysis equipment - which presumably runs a lot better with IoT.  Also the use of banana stalks for biochar in Indonesia..

I hope you can give an update on biochar, Indonesia, your own company and reasons for your IoT question.

Ron



On Mar 20, 2021, at 4:19 PM, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Whether any informations about biochar application integrated with IoT (Internet of Things) ?

Regards
Eko




John Hofmeyr
 

It would be interesting to see the metadata underlying the bar chart. If the dryland yield is zero because of zero water / rainfall, can biochar make any difference? 

The conventional wisdom suggests that no plants can grow without any water. So I speculate that there must have been at least some water / rainfall but not enough to allow any dryland crop whatsoever. If that's the case, it really is a spectacular result - 4t/ha attributable solely to the presence of 10t/ha of biochar. In the absence of other information I assume that the biochar was applied unprimed and unwetted?


Ron Larson
 

John and list.

I took the main variable to be soil pH.  Maybe Eko knows.

Ron

On Mar 21, 2021, at 12:22 PM, John Hofmeyr <john-h@...> wrote:

It would be interesting to see the metadata underlying the bar chart. If the dryland yield is zero because of zero water / rainfall, can biochar make any difference? 

The conventional wisdom suggests that no plants can grow without any water. So I speculate that there must have been at least some water / rainfall but not enough to allow any dryland crop whatsoever. If that's the case, it really is a spectacular result - 4t/ha attributable solely to the presence of 10t/ha of biochar. In the absence of other information I assume that the biochar was applied unprimed and unwetted?



eko sb setyawan
 

Hi All,

Indonesia is tropical country so the rainfall usually quite high. As you may know that paddy/rice field usually waterlogged  in exception few varieties of paddy. The dry land in the book refer to the field like corn field no need waterlogged. Such dry fields also has rainfall usually more than 1,000 mm/year. The usage of biochar will reduce irrigation in some vegetable or corn in some dry fields area like in East Nusa Tenggara province and increase the yield. I think they use also fertilizer for such field to get the 4 ton/ha yield.

I met Dr Nurhuda and use his stove with wood pellet. At the time I involved in wood pellet production from red calliandra energy plantation that held by Indonesia Ministry of Forestry. But I think he most concern about biomass stove that can subtitute the propane gas (LPG) that sometime make problem in some regions in Indonesia.

Regards
Eko

On Monday, March 22, 2021, 3:47:51 AM GMT+7, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


John and list.

I took the main variable to be soil pH.  Maybe Eko knows.

Ron

On Mar 21, 2021, at 12:22 PM, John Hofmeyr <john-h@...> wrote:

It would be interesting to see the metadata underlying the bar chart. If the dryland yield is zero because of zero water / rainfall, can biochar make any difference? 

The conventional wisdom suggests that no plants can grow without any water. So I speculate that there must have been at least some water / rainfall but not enough to allow any dryland crop whatsoever. If that's the case, it really is a spectacular result - 4t/ha attributable solely to the presence of 10t/ha of biochar. In the absence of other information I assume that the biochar was applied unprimed and unwetted?



eko sb setyawan
 

Btw if anyone looking for economic analysis biochar application in palm oil business, please contact me. There are a lot of countries that have palm oil plantation, please refer to the attached file.

Regards
Eko

On Monday, March 22, 2021, 12:09:15 PM GMT+7, eko sb setyawan via groups.io <scottie0072002@...> wrote:


Hi All,

Indonesia is tropical country so the rainfall usually quite high. As you may know that paddy/rice field usually waterlogged  in exception few varieties of paddy. The dry land in the book refer to the field like corn field no need waterlogged. Such dry fields also has rainfall usually more than 1,000 mm/year. The usage of biochar will reduce irrigation in some vegetable or corn in some dry fields area like in East Nusa Tenggara province and increase the yield. I think they use also fertilizer for such field to get the 4 ton/ha yield.

I met Dr Nurhuda and use his stove with wood pellet. At the time I involved in wood pellet production from red calliandra energy plantation that held by Indonesia Ministry of Forestry. But I think he most concern about biomass stove that can subtitute the propane gas (LPG) that sometime make problem in some regions in Indonesia.

Regards
Eko

On Monday, March 22, 2021, 3:47:51 AM GMT+7, Ron Larson <rongretlarson@...> wrote:


John and list.

I took the main variable to be soil pH.  Maybe Eko knows.

Ron

On Mar 21, 2021, at 12:22 PM, John Hofmeyr <john-h@...> wrote:

It would be interesting to see the metadata underlying the bar chart. If the dryland yield is zero because of zero water / rainfall, can biochar make any difference? 

The conventional wisdom suggests that no plants can grow without any water. So I speculate that there must have been at least some water / rainfall but not enough to allow any dryland crop whatsoever. If that's the case, it really is a spectacular result - 4t/ha attributable solely to the presence of 10t/ha of biochar. In the absence of other information I assume that the biochar was applied unprimed and unwetted?