Char crusher technology


Paul S Anderson
 

Biocharists,

 

I provide to all two documents about char crusher technology.

 

One file named “rocker” was submitted to everyone on this discussion group a year ago by John Hofmeyr.   Thank you, John. 

 

The other one I have named “press” because some old-style printing presses had such  press action.

 

The “Press” design was given to me with  the understanding that the inventor would not be named.   Anyone making the device assumes  total personal  responsibility.   There is no liability attributed to the designer.   If he or she would like to be recognized, he or she should contact me to verify his/her claim.

 

If anyone makes either of the two designs, please send your photos and written results to the  biochar discussion group (and a copy to me, please.)

 

The biochar “small scale industry” is in need of a functional char crusher. 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Eli Fishpaw
 

I remember this design.  The press inventor on this list sent me this detailed file.  I thought about this recently.  My reason for not developing it was that I did not understand how it works.  However, the word of the inventor that it did work is compelling.  It looks like I am back to the drawing board.  
 
My very first message over a year ago proffered the idea of 20 ton hydraulic press.  Nobody commented on that idea, so maybe not a good one. However, this was inspired by the many that use their car or pickup to crush charcoal.  Crushing, not grinding.  
 
Eli


----- Original Message -----
From: Paul S Anderson [mailto:psanders@...]
To: "biochar@groups.io" <biochar@groups.io>
Cc: psanders@...
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:04:48 +0000
Subject: [Biochar] Char crusher technology

Biocharists,

 

I provide to all two documents about char crusher technology.

 

One file named “rocker” was submitted to everyone on this discussion group a year ago by John Hofmeyr.   Thank you, John. 

 

The other one I have named “press” because some old-style printing presses had such  press action.

 

The “Press” design was given to me with  the understanding that the inventor would not be named.   Anyone making the device assumes  total personal  responsibility.   There is no liability attributed to the designer.   If he or she would like to be recognized, he or she should contact me to verify his/her claim.

 

If anyone makes either of the two designs, please send your photos and written results to the  biochar discussion group (and a copy to me, please.)

 

The biochar “small scale industry” is in need of a functional char crusher. 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


David Griffiths
 

For making beer, I have a barley crusher that uses two rollers with an adjustable gap to crush the grain just enough that the hot water can activate the enzymes, but not so much that it creates chaff. You can put a large hopper on it and an electric drill to speed it up. Not sure how it would do with a rock.  Probably creates more dust than a press.

I don't make much biochar - 5 or so gallons a year to add to the two-to-three hot-then-worms composts I make between spring and fall - so I soak it for a few days, then mash it with a brick. Low-tech but fast, cheap and effective with no dust. The soaking water goes into the compost as well.

David


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 8:18 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:
I remember this design.  The press inventor on this list sent me this detailed file.  I thought about this recently.  My reason for not developing it was that I did not understand how it works.  However, the word of the inventor that it did work is compelling.  It looks like I am back to the drawing board.  
 
My very first message over a year ago proffered the idea of 20 ton hydraulic press.  Nobody commented on that idea, so maybe not a good one. However, this was inspired by the many that use their car or pickup to crush charcoal.  Crushing, not grinding.  
 
Eli


----- Original Message -----
From: Paul S Anderson [mailto:psanders@...]
To: "biochar@groups.io" <biochar@groups.io>
Cc: psanders@...
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:04:48 +0000
Subject: [Biochar] Char crusher technology

Biocharists,

 

I provide to all two documents about char crusher technology.

 

One file named “rocker” was submitted to everyone on this discussion group a year ago by John Hofmeyr.   Thank you, John. 

 

The other one I have named “press” because some old-style printing presses had such  press action.

 

The “Press” design was given to me with  the understanding that the inventor would not be named.   Anyone making the device assumes  total personal  responsibility.   There is no liability attributed to the designer.   If he or she would like to be recognized, he or she should contact me to verify his/her claim.

 

If anyone makes either of the two designs, please send your photos and written results to the  biochar discussion group (and a copy to me, please.)

 

The biochar “small scale industry” is in need of a functional char crusher. 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


 

I'm going to consider about how I might use my 7 ton electric wood splitter as a crusher.  Char made via kon-tiki systems has to be wet to stop burning, and wet does not work in grain grinders. The shredder makes the char too fine I think.   
David Derbowka




David R Derbowka             Chief Executive Officer

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |



On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 8:33 AM David Griffiths <griffithsdavid@...> wrote:
For making beer, I have a barley crusher that uses two rollers with an adjustable gap to crush the grain just enough that the hot water can activate the enzymes, but not so much that it creates chaff. You can put a large hopper on it and an electric drill to speed it up. Not sure how it would do with a rock.  Probably creates more dust than a press.

I don't make much biochar - 5 or so gallons a year to add to the two-to-three hot-then-worms composts I make between spring and fall - so I soak it for a few days, then mash it with a brick. Low-tech but fast, cheap and effective with no dust. The soaking water goes into the compost as well.

David


On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 8:18 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:
I remember this design.  The press inventor on this list sent me this detailed file.  I thought about this recently.  My reason for not developing it was that I did not understand how it works.  However, the word of the inventor that it did work is compelling.  It looks like I am back to the drawing board.  
 
My very first message over a year ago proffered the idea of 20 ton hydraulic press.  Nobody commented on that idea, so maybe not a good one. However, this was inspired by the many that use their car or pickup to crush charcoal.  Crushing, not grinding.  
 
Eli


----- Original Message -----
From: Paul S Anderson [mailto:psanders@...]
To: "biochar@groups.io" <biochar@groups.io>
Cc: psanders@...
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 06:04:48 +0000
Subject: [Biochar] Char crusher technology

Biocharists,

 

I provide to all two documents about char crusher technology.

 

One file named “rocker” was submitted to everyone on this discussion group a year ago by John Hofmeyr.   Thank you, John. 

 

The other one I have named “press” because some old-style printing presses had such  press action.

 

The “Press” design was given to me with  the understanding that the inventor would not be named.   Anyone making the device assumes  total personal  responsibility.   There is no liability attributed to the designer.   If he or she would like to be recognized, he or she should contact me to verify his/her claim.

 

If anyone makes either of the two designs, please send your photos and written results to the  biochar discussion group (and a copy to me, please.)

 

The biochar “small scale industry” is in need of a functional char crusher. 

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 


Ian McChesney
 

Hi Eli, it works in the same way that you use a door to crack a nut. Open the door, put the nut in the hinge. Close the door until you hear the 'crack'

In this case the char goes in the top and once 'cracked' it is small enough to fall out of the bottom. We wanted a granular char, without dust, from dry lump wood char. Eventually we found that the best way to to do this is with a Roll Mill, but then the char may need to be be pre-crushed to suit the size of the rolls. It also has to be powered.

The hinge action is typical of a jaw crusher. However, commercial jaw crushers ie. the type you rent to break up concrete waste at home, also move the plates slighty. This additional shear action under pressure is very effective in causing the char (or concrete) to shatter. However, it is difficult to replicate this in a simple device. 

A hammer is more efficient than a hinge as you can apply a lot of force without much energy, but it is difficult to control the result. A hinge action takes more energy. Also you need a very stiff door (or press lever) otherwise a lot of effort is put into bending the door, not cracking the nut. The press device could do with stiffer handles. 

At the time we needed something quick and inexpensive from readily available materials to process small quantities.  

The idea is that you load the char and tell your assistant to take the handles ................, Ian  





Geoff Thomas
 



It is interesting the way the char compresses under pressure, - effectively getting tighter and more solid, a process that leads ultimately to diamnds I guess, - a similiar (but not the same) effect you get when at a certain stage of custard making, you can not push your spoon quickly through the custard to be, as it “Jams Up”, becoming intransigently insubordinate.
I had approached a big Cow Feed company locally, - multiple tons a day, etc and they told me about jamming in their Augurs, - basically shudown the whole line and get some one it to fix it, take the Augor apart and clean each “rung”, very expensive.

Sio, I don’t know if there is an Augor design that could transfer Biochar, - eg mixed with molasses for cow feeding, or whatever, - seems to be that you can not allow the Biochar to be compressed,  as it sorts of wants to.
With a concrete mixer, given the random impacts of large, hard, and heavy stones, - (eg basalt, as it will improve the soil,) that seems to work fine, and sometimes concrete delivery trucks have an expensive problem with their mixer, that makes them cheaper to buy a new one, so sell them quite cheaply and may be not that hard to fix, ie weld in some good strong steel plates, new bearings, or whatever.
Certainly the unit will not be under as much stress as when it was driven on the road with all those stresses. 

You could have an electrically driven fixed in place, Big, crusher that could give many years of service, although it still does not solve the moving it around problem, - I guess that enclosed cupped belts could serve quite some situations, - a bit like coal fired power stations, transporting from a nearby mine, - Hey, lots of closed, coal fired, power stations now in the US, wanting to sell off their Stranded Assets..

Any body else thinking of or have come up with solutions, - the reality was brought home to me with my sidestream charcoal powdering Augor,  (for my dog’s nightly dinner, as otherwise he farts something dreadful) - an old (Sausage meat, Wheat grinder) ? device I have had around for ages, - the charcoal passes through the big screw part OK, but the end, where the stuff comes out I had to unscrew the screen, to leave a significant gap, where much bigger pieces could exit than I wanted to could exit, so requiring sieving all the output, - otherwise it would just, sooner or later, jam up.
Fortunately very small scale, but salutary if you consider large quantity situations, the principle is the same.

Certainly, in Doug Pow’s  inspiring video,   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JPoItRWYSQ     (allow following video to play also)  mixing the charcoal and molasses in old cut off 5 gallon “troughs” stirred by a piece of wood, does not really look like being practical on a large scale.
I am surrounded on three sides by a beef cattle farm, they have a mollasses store with  3 of 30,000litre ? poly tanks, - each with different properties, coming to a central point where they can, Electic motor pump driven, mix the different molasses' to fill 500 litre plastic containers that go to their 12 different acreages, scattered over different ecologies from semi desert to rich rainforest.

In a greater or lesser scale, this seems likely to me to be a common situation, and it is at that point that would be where the Charcoal/biochar could be mixed most efficiently, and one might think that an augor could bring the powder in to some sort of mixing chamber (?) - an ideal answer, but much doubt, - are there better/tested Augors for this situation?

This is, I believe, a big problem, and I, and i think the whole Biochar world, could do with a generous sharing of tried solutions

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas




On 12 Mar 2021, at 4:04 pm, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> wrote:

Biocharists,
 
I provide to all two documents about char crusher technology.
 
One file named “rocker” was submitted to everyone on this discussion group a year ago by John Hofmeyr.   Thank you, John. 
 
The other one I have named “press” because some old-style printing presses had such  press action.
 
The “Press” design was given to me with  the understanding that the inventor would not be named.   Anyone making the device assumes  total personal  responsibility.   There is no liability attributed to the designer.   If he or she would like to be recognized, he or she should contact me to verify his/her claim.
 
If anyone makes either of the two designs, please send your photos and written results to the  biochar discussion group (and a copy to me, please.)
 
The biochar “small scale industry” is in need of a functional char crusher. 
 
Paul
 
Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com
         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud
         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org  
Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources   
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.
 
<Char crusher -- rocker.docx><Char crusher press assembly completed.doc>


Geoff Thomas
 

It is interesting the way the char compresses under pressure, - effectively getting tighter and more solid, a process that leads ultimately to diamnds I guess, - a similiar (but not the same) effect you get when at a certain stage of custard making, you can not push your spoon quickly through the custard to be, as it “Jams Up”, becoming intransigently insubordinate.
I had approached a big Cow Feed company locally, - multiple tons a day, etc and they told me about jamming in their Augurs, - basically shudown the whole line and get some one it to fix it, take the Augor apart and clean each “rung”, very expensive.

Sio, I don’t know if there is an Augor design that could transfer Biochar, - eg mixed with molasses for cow feeding, or whatever, - seems to be that you can not allow the Biochar to be compressed,  as it sorts of wants to.
With a concrete mixer, given the random impacts of large, hard, and heavy stones, - (eg basalt, as it will improve the soil,) that seems to work fine, and sometimes concrete delivery trucks have an expensive problem with their mixer, that makes them cheaper to buy a new one, so sell them quite cheaply and may be not that hard to fix, ie weld in some good strong steel plates, new bearings, or whatever.
Certainly the unit will not be under as much stress as when it was driven on the road with all those stresses. 

You could have an electrically driven fixed in place, Big, crusher that could give many years of service, although it still does not solve the moving it around problem, - I guess that enclosed cupped belts could serve quite some situations, - a bit like coal fired power stations, transporting from a nearby mine, - Hey, lots of closed, coal fired, power stations now in the US, wanting to sell off their Stranded Assets..

Any body else thinking of or have come up with solutions, - the reality was brought home to me with my sidestream charcoal powdering Augor,  (for my dog’s nightly dinner, as otherwise he farts something dreadful) - an old (Sausage meat, Wheat grinder) ? device I have had around for ages, - the charcoal passes through the big screw part OK, but the end, where the stuff comes out I had to unscrew the screen, to leave a significant gap, where much bigger pieces could exit than I wanted to could exit, so requiring sieving all the output, - otherwise it would just, sooner or later, jam up.
Fortunately very small scale, but salutary if you consider large quantity situations, the principle is the same.

Certainly, in Doug Pow’s  inspiring video,   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JPoItRWYSQ     (allow following video to play also)  mixing the charcoal and molasses in old cut off 5 gallon “troughs” stirred by a piece of wood, does not really look like being practical on a large scale.
I am surrounded on three sides by a beef cattle farm, they have a mollasses store with  3 of 30,000litre ? poly tanks, - each with different properties, coming to a central point where they can, Electic motor pump driven, mix the different molasses' to fill 500 litre plastic containers that go to their 12 different acreages, scattered over different ecologies from semi desert to rich rainforest.

In a greater or lesser scale, this seems likely to me to be a common situation, and it is at that point that would be where the Charcoal/biochar could be mixed most efficiently, and one might think that an augor could bring the powder in to some sort of mixing chamber (?) - an ideal answer, but much doubt, - are there better/tested Augors for this situation?

This is, I believe, a big problem, and I, and i think the whole Biochar world, could do with a generous sharing of tried solutions

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas


On 13 Mar 2021, at 4:42 pm, Ian McChesney <ian.mcchesney@...> wrote:

Hi Eli, it works in the same way that you use a door to crack a nut. Open the door, put the nut in the hinge. Close the door until you hear the 'crack'

In this case the char goes in the top and once 'cracked' it is small enough to fall out of the bottom. We wanted a granular char, without dust, from dry lump wood char. Eventually we found that the best way to to do this is with a Roll Mill, but then the char may need to be be pre-crushed to suit the size of the rolls. It also has to be powered.

The hinge action is typical of a jaw crusher. However, commercial jaw crushers ie. the type you rent to break up concrete waste at home, also move the plates slighty. This additional shear action under pressure is very effective in causing the char (or concrete) to shatter. However, it is difficult to replicate this in a simple device. 

A hammer is more efficient than a hinge as you can apply a lot of force without much energy, but it is difficult to control the result. A hinge action takes more energy. Also you need a very stiff door (or press lever) otherwise a lot of effort is put into bending the door, not cracking the nut. The press device could do with stiffer handles. 

At the time we needed something quick and inexpensive from readily available materials to process small quantities.  

The idea is that you load the char and tell your assistant to take the handles ................, Ian  






mikethewormguy
 

Geoff,

So is the question how best to deliver sweet char to the cattle or how best to make sweet char..?

Mike


Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Mike, 
I guess I am talking about crushing and moving large amounts of char into a cattle feed mixture, the which can be bagged in large quantities after it is thoroughly mixed.
This would be the common situation in America as far as I can determine.

The mixing with molasses is because of the common Australian open range cattle farming, where eg. Molasses is a supplement that the cows will eat the which is already used widely.
Often the only supplement is a molasses mixture, except in draught times.

I often hear on this list that there is not a big enough market for Biochar and am foreshadowing the possible problems in bulk usage, so that if the idea takes off, all those actually making char can offer their product to this potentially huge usage to feed eg the 93 million Cows in America and the 28 million cows in Australia, at the rate of 1/3rd of a kilo per cow per day.
Of course that includes the minority of Range fed cows in America, and the minority of Lot fed cows in Australia.

In Australia that would sequester about 2% of Australian annual carbon emissions, and another 6% (conservative) emission reduction from Methane contributions, total 8%.
Then there is the rehabilitation of the seriously damaged Australian soil structure and water holding capability.

I notice also the claim by Doug Pow that the char, - on it’s way through the cow, to become Biochar, serves as a ‘roughage’ to reduce the need of feeding dry material to cows for that purpose.

This area of forward planning is not really dealt with in discussions about one man operations, but about the situation with widespread usage of Biochar, and the delivery of said to individual farms in at least truckloads, inc. semitrailer truck loads, (now being developed Electric semitrailers..) and the economic possibilities.

eg, molasses could be mixed with both the char and various grain supplements to make large dryish blocks, or cylinders, wrapped in waxed paper so as not to stick to each other.

Many farmers are now becoming more open to being more environmentally conscious, but they need a large scale convenient method of buying it and storing, eg.  Biochar, so it can fit into their current management paradigms, some of which require mass production.

Cheers,
Geoff,

On 20 Mar 2021, at 12:00 am, mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:

Geoff,

So is the question how best to deliver sweet char to the cattle or how best to make sweet char..?

Mike


mikethewormguy
 

Geoff,

Here in the USA we have molasses beet pulp pellets that are used as a feed supplement for cattle.

I would expect that a wood biomass char ingredient could be added to during the pelleting process.

Mike


Stephen Joseph
 

We have been making a liquid mixture and spraying onto hay. Seems to work fine but early days of testing.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Mar 20, 2021 at 4:22 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Geoff,

Here in the USA we have molasses beet pulp pellets that are used as a feed supplement for cattle.

I would expect that a wood biomass char ingredient could be added to during the pelleting process.

Mike


Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Mike, thanks for that, I would guess that the sort of questions they may be required to answer, - could their pellets contain the char in sufficient percentage to provide 3.3 kgs of char per daily feed of pellets, - how does it compare with other costings, - are they registered for that product, etc, but I guess they either have determined how to mass produce their product or are not able to produce very much?
Whatever, it is a start.

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 20 Mar 2021, at 3:22 pm, mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:

Geoff,

Here in the USA we have molasses beet pulp pellets that are used as a feed supplement for cattle.

I would expect that a wood biomass char ingredient could be added to during the pelleting process.

Mike


Geoff Thomas
 

Thanks Stephen, I would imagine any farmer that makes and applies the biochar to his hay or such would be competitive over any farmer buying a complete product that would replace his current expenditure with the char containing product, and I agree that more testing will help, but I guess I am trying to think about the average big beef farms, who may have an employed buyer contemplating a flyer with various feed stock products, and just wants to tick one of the boxes, - probably prepared to pay a bit more, as word gets around, but who will not be involved in feeding the cows, and more beholden to the multinational owner and it’s shareholders.
I don’t agree that industry should go in this direction but it is totally beyond my powers to influence that situation a single iota, so I think more about how to adapt to it, particularly as big companies are now receiving pressure to assist in global warming etc. issues, the which are not going to go away.

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 20 Mar 2021, at 3:42 pm, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

We have been making a liquid mixture and spraying onto hay. Seems to work fine but early days of testing.

Regards
Stephen

On Sat, Mar 20, 2021 at 4:22 PM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Geoff,

Here in the USA we have molasses beet pulp pellets that are used as a feed supplement for cattle.

I would expect that a wood biomass char ingredient could be added to during the pelleting process.

Mike




Frank Strie
 


In response to the discussion about FeedChar for Livestock:

Geoff Thomas:
   “… to provide 3.3 kgs of char per daily feed of pellets ?? = ~x 3 for volume = that would be almost 10litre/day??

May I suggest that the above dosage would be far too high as I have not seen such high figures quoted previously
0.25kg  to 0.3kg/day therefore say x 3 = for volume = .75 litre to 0.9litre/day  


For example:
According to CharLine Austria:

FeedChar Powder?

The recommended way of usage

It has been clearly demonstrated that FeedChar for cattle has the best effect on the animals when added directly to the daily food.
It makes no difference whether this is silage, concentrate feed or any other feed choice.

Charline FeedChar is to be added in very small amounts.
However, you have to stop the addition during the use of medication, as there is a possibility of active substance binding.



The optimal dosage...

can easily be obtained by daily supplementation.
e.g.: 0.5 % FeedChar (based on the feed weight) should be added on a daily basis.

0.5 % based on the feed weight (dry matter)
(In case of severe digestive problems add the double dosage for 2 days)

e.g.: per 100 kg feed 0.5 kg FeedChar for cattle is needed.



 

https://www.char-line.com/at-en/futterkohle/futterkohle-fuer-kaelber

CharLine FeedChar for calves

Old natural home remedy- rediscovered and improved.

CharLine Futterkohle für Kälber - Eimer

For an optimal supply of the calves with FeedChar it is very important that the grinding degree is even finer than the grinding degree of FeedChar for cattle. Thus, the FeedChar for calves is able to take full effect in the abomasum.

A bucket (3 kg) is supposed to last for a calf for about 200 days.

 

https://www.char-line.com/at-en/futterkohle/futterkohle-fuer-schweine

 

The optimal dosage

can easily be obtained by daily supplemtation of 0.5 %.

e.g.: per 100 kg feed 0.5kg FeedChar for pigs is needed

0.5 % based on the feed weight (dry matter)

(In case of severe digestive problems add the double dosage for 2  )

e.g.: per 100 kg feed 0.5 kg FeedChar for pigs is needed

 

Very low costs...

due to the savings in consequence of much healthier pigs and piglets.

Best regards
Frank again

 

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas
Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2021 4:49 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Char crusher technology

 

Hi Mike, thanks for that, I would guess that the sort of questions they may be required to answer, - could their pellets contain the char in sufficient percentage to provide 3.3 kgs of char per daily feed of pellets, - how does it compare with other costings, - are they registered for that product, etc, but I guess they either have determined how to mass produce their product or are not able to produce very much?

Whatever, it is a start.

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

 

On 20 Mar 2021, at 3:22 pm, mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:

 

Geoff,

Here in the USA we have molasses beet pulp pellets that are used as a feed supplement for cattle.

I would expect that a wood biomass char ingredient could be added to during the pelleting process.

Mike

 


mikethewormguy
 

Geoff,

Making a pellet is a great delivery system for a range of operational scales.

Mike



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Geoff Thomas
 

Apologies, my bad, .33kg is the normal figure quoted, ie a third of a kilogram, but of course if the charcaol was only a tenth of the pellet..
But I don’t know that that is the case so no let out there.
In fact I have a slight case of dyslexia, - usually only interchanging 2 letters, - although I have been selling Solar panels for over 30 years, unless I am watching myself very carefully, I always type Soalr.

Spellcheck doesn’t spot it, yet despite my reading speed, - with eye movements, - ie not speed reading, is 2,200 words per minute, (used to read three books/day, - every day) and I have a spelliing vocabulary of at least 80,000 words, it still happens, and it seems to be getting very slowly worse, - I am now 71, what will I be spelling like at 91? perhaps nniety noe..
Probably speech to type and lucky if still alive..
Hearing is the 9th of the 12 senses, and it’s opposite, the 3rd, so quite important, is movement, - perhaps I have damaged my sense of movement with all that fast reading?
Whatever, it is a frustration as I have to spend a lot of time error checking despite normally excellent spelling.

I notice that the Maories in South Island New Zealand are taking over the rivers because the cow cockies have polluted 60% of their rivers with cow urine and nitrate fertilisers, - sounds like with the poor soil, huge amounts of irrigation and high stocking figures they have achieved almost Hydroponic dairies, perhaps a massive amount of Biochar/compost mix may be helpful?
As many of you probably know, the Maories were never conquered by the English, so never surrendered, so the treaty may indeed support such a claim, - the whites have let the team down, - a teaspoonful of the black algae on the rocks in the rivers, is said to kill an adult human. 
 Fortunately they didn’t prove that fact in the documentary, but if they had had a white dairy owner present the video may have got very interesting indeed.
So why worry about a few thousands of cow cockies having to find new work? - it seems that the dairy industry is NZ/s biggest export industry so not so easy.
The Biochar industry may have to upscale much more quickly than we have thought, Frank.

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 20 Mar 2021, at 5:33 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:


In response to the discussion about FeedChar for Livestock:

Geoff Thomas: 
   “… to provide 3.3 kgs of char per daily feed of pellets ?? = ~x 3 for volume = that would be almost 10litre/day??

May I suggest that the above dosage would be far too high as I have not seen such high figures quoted previously 
0.25kg  to 0.3kg/day therefore say x 3 = for volume = .75 litre to 0.9litre/day  


For example: 
According to CharLine Austria:

FeedChar Powder?

The recommended way of usage

It has been clearly demonstrated that FeedChar for cattle has the best effect on the animals when added directly to the daily food. 
It makes no difference whether this is silage, concentrate feed or any other feed choice.
Charline FeedChar is to be added in very small amounts. 
However, you have to stop the addition during the use of medication, as there is a possibility of active substance binding.



The optimal dosage...

<image001.png>
can easily be obtained by daily supplementation.
e.g.: 0.5 % FeedChar (based on the feed weight) should be added on a daily basis.
0.5 % based on the feed weight (dry matter)
(In case of severe digestive problems add the double dosage for 2 days)
e.g.: per 100 kg feed 0.5 kg FeedChar for cattle is needed.



 

https://www.char-line.com/at-en/futterkohle/futterkohle-fuer-kaelber

CharLine FeedChar for calves

Old natural home remedy- rediscovered and improved.

<image002.png>
<image003.png>
For an optimal supply of the calves with FeedChar it is very important that the grinding degree is even finer than the grinding degree of FeedChar for cattle. Thus, the FeedChar for calves is able to take full effect in the abomasum.
A bucket (3 kg) is supposed to last for a calf for about 200 days.
 
 
The optimal dosage
<image004.png>
can easily be obtained by daily supplemtation of 0.5 %.
e.g.: per 100 kg feed 0.5kg FeedChar for pigs is needed
0.5 % based on the feed weight (dry matter)
(In case of severe digestive problems add the double dosage for 2  )
e.g.: per 100 kg feed 0.5 kg FeedChar for pigs is needed

 

Very low costs...

due to the savings in consequence of much healthier pigs and piglets.
Best regards
Frank again
 
 
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Geoff Thomas
Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2021 4:49 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Char crusher technology
 
Hi Mike, thanks for that, I would guess that the sort of questions they may be required to answer, - could their pellets contain the char in sufficient percentage to provide 3.3 kgs of char per daily feed of pellets, - how does it compare with other costings, - are they registered for that product, etc, but I guess they either have determined how to mass produce their product or are not able to produce very much?
Whatever, it is a start.
 
Cheers,
Geoff.
 
On 20 Mar 2021, at 3:22 pm, mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...> wrote:
 
Geoff,

Here in the USA we have molasses beet pulp pellets that are used as a feed supplement for cattle.

I would expect that a wood biomass char ingredient could be added to during the pelleting process.

Mike 
 



Kelpie Wilson
 

Hi guys,
Looks like Frank and I have converged on the same crushing solution: the Hammermill.
I put together some slides that examine different options, with some pictures, documenting my journey with char-crushing, attached.
Hope this is helpful and let's keep after this!
Kelpie


Nando Breiter
 

Kelpie,

Thanks for your writeup! What particle size are you getting with your hammermill approach? How consistent is it?

I appreciate your comment about getting the moisture content right to control dust when using a hammer mill. Char dust can be explosive under the right conditions, so operating a hammer mill indoors using dry char can be more dangerous than it might seem.

For particle size consistency and precision, a roller mill may be a good choice. I would also expect that it would produce less dust than most other methods. See https://www.mpechicago.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/powder_and_bulk_engineering_6-06.pdf . According to this article, particle sizes down to 100 microns are typical with roller mills.

I've used a hand operated roller mill designed to crush grapes. The rolls are serrated along their length. This worked well to crush branch sized char pieces into grape seed sized char pieces. I'd want it smaller, and could modify this device to be able to adjust the distance between the rolls, and then crush the char down in several steps.

n


On Sat, Mar 20, 2021 at 7:41 PM Kelpie Wilson <kelpiew@...> wrote:
Hi guys,
Looks like Frank and I have converged on the same crushing solution: the Hammermill.
I put together some slides that examine different options, with some pictures, documenting my journey with char-crushing, attached.
Hope this is helpful and let's keep after this!
Kelpie


--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Kelpie, good stuff, - what was Frank’s hammermill Please?

Cheers,
Geoff.

On 21 Mar 2021, at 8:30 am, Nando Breiter <nando@...> wrote:

Kelpie,

Thanks for your writeup! What particle size are you getting with your hammermill approach? How consistent is it?

I appreciate your comment about getting the moisture content right to control dust when using a hammer mill. Char dust can be explosive under the right conditions, so operating a hammer mill indoors using dry char can be more dangerous than it might seem.

For particle size consistency and precision, a roller mill may be a good choice. I would also expect that it would produce less dust than most other methods. See https://www.mpechicago.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/powder_and_bulk_engineering_6-06.pdf . According to this article, particle sizes down to 100 microns are typical with roller mills.

I've used a hand operated roller mill designed to crush grapes. The rolls are serrated along their length. This worked well to crush branch sized char pieces into grape seed sized char pieces. I'd want it smaller, and could modify this device to be able to adjust the distance between the rolls, and then crush the char down in several steps.

n


On Sat, Mar 20, 2021 at 7:41 PM Kelpie Wilson <kelpiew@...> wrote:
Hi guys,
Looks like Frank and I have converged on the same crushing solution: the Hammermill.
I put together some slides that examine different options, with some pictures, documenting my journey with char-crushing, attached.
Hope this is helpful and let's keep after this!
Kelpie



--
Nando Breiter
http://biochar.info
CarbonZero Sagl
Astano, Switzerland


Kelpie Wilson
 

On Sat, Mar 20, 2021 at 03:30 PM, Nando Breiter wrote:
https://www.mpechicago.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/powder_and_bulk_engineering_6-06.pdf
Hi Nando,
My hammermill makes a nice, consistent granular size - perfect for adding to soil blends or compost, or using in my poo and pee buckets. I think it is an 8mm screen that I use, but because of the compressions and stickiness that Geoff described so well, the hammers have to hit a lot before the char goes through the holes in the screen and the resulting particle size is more like 4mm and less.
I have wanted to try a roller mill, but as someone else pointed out here, you might need two sets of rollers, one to grab and crush the bigger chunks into bite size pieces that can then go through another set of more closely spaced rollers. Roller mills are expensive, too. Hammermill is the best IMHO. If you have a tractor you can get one that runs off your PTO. 
-Kelpie