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Dwelling on Drawdown #drawdown


Kathleen Draper
 

Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen


Balz Baur
 

Hello Kathleen

The closest to this application as far as I know, is Embren from Stockholm

regards

Balz

Am 23.09.2020 um 17:24 schrieb Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...>:

Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen <Dwelling on Drawdown - biochar sinks.pptm>


Stephen Joseph
 

Hi Kathleen


Have a look at Karry Fisher watts trench system to stop ingress of salt.  An outline is in the White paper.

Here is a paper .  It has been highly successful.  Their farm is very productive.  Why not put on IBI website.

Regards
Stephen

On Thu, Sep 24, 2020 at 1:30 AM Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:
Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen


Geoff Thomas
 

Fantastic Work Stephen, very interesting project, with creative usage of different ingredients to achieve the whole purpose.
I think it could be a usage of Biochar with world wide importance.

On a side note, you could perhaps inform the property owner, there is a pump made in Australia, an air powered water pump, - initially specially designed for coal mines in the Newcastle area, these pumps are designed to handle all sorts of toxic chemicals, acids, alkalines, grit, sand, etc. and not being a centrifugal pump but a positive displacement pump, are far less liable to slow build-up, seizing, etc.

I came across these air powered pumps whilst designing a new pumping system for Australia’s bushfire fighting fleet, acquired one and have tested it to be sure it can replace the traditional diesel or petrol pumps used on firetrucks, as when a fire overtakes one, it uses the oxygen in the air that the aspirated pumps need so they stop, as does the mist certain or buffer the pump runs, that would otherwise save the lives of the fire fighters, - we lost several crews in the Sutherland Fires  few decades ago, that would have survived with this technology.

I found these pumps extremely robust, powerful, simple to maintain and use, and very suitable for fire truck pumps, as well as many other uses,    - to such a degree I have taken on the Agency for selling them, - only in Far North Queensland, not West Australia, so  here is their website. www.pumps2000.com

Of course they have to be fed compressed air, but the compressor can be a great distance away as resistance to air flowing through a pipe is far less than water, also these pumps continue to function under water, so I imagine would suit the extraction of the salty water from that property, thus prolonging the life of the Charwells?

Cheers,
Geoff Thomas.

On 24 Sep 2020, at 7:49 am, Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:

<Potential of biochar permeable reactive barrier.docx>


d.michael.shafer@gmail.com
 

Kathleen,

Nothing re your question, but a related one: have you found a replacement for cement? I know about using biochar in cement, but the entire process is so energy and carbon intensive (extensive?) that no amount of biochar will offset its foot print. But is there an alternative for slabs, columns, etc. that is routinely available? Where we are, cutting trees is banned and composite wood products are not available.

M




photo
Dr. D. Michael Shafer
Founder and Director, Warm Heart

+1 732-745-9295 | +66 (0)85 199-2958 | d.michael.shafer@...

www.warmheartworldwide.org | Skype: live:d.michael.shafer53

61 M.8 T.Maepang A.Phrao 50190 Chiang Mai Thailand

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 10:30 PM Kathleen Draper <biocharro2@...> wrote:
Hello all- 
I've been on a bit of a biochar hiatus for the past few months due to building my own personal c-sink sanctuary. I've dubbed my project Dwelling on Drawdown as I'm trying to incorporate different sequestration techniques and avoiding, to the extent possible, high embodied carbon products. I've learned this is NOT easy and though there are some VERY interesting biochar based building materials in the pipeline, they are not commercially available yet for the most part. 

The first 1st biochar sink I used (maybe discovered?) was applying it as pipe bedding in my very rocky soils - normally regulations in New York call for 6 - 12" of sand for pipe bedding. I didn't have enough to do it as deep as I would have liked, but still managed to sequestered probably 1 ton of CO2e. I calculated that if I had put biochar 1' deep along the whole trench it could have sequestered 6 - 8 tons.  The current biochar sink that I am working on is in the dripline trenches and the next will be in my leach field. Does anyone know of others that have done anything like this and if so, do they have any advice especially on application methods, amounts and particle size? Photos in the attached show our unique application method - not the greatest, but it worked!

Cheers
Kathleen


Shaked From
 
Edited

We have used these biofilters designs in the past, installed as branch outlets, as many as needed depending on the amount of water (in NZ the consent process assumes the amount of greywater based on the number of rooms in a dwelling) (based on Art Ludwig's design)