Topics

Forest biochar rocket stove #stoves


detiffe nicolas
 

plan estufa israel.pdf

PDF  a través de  Google Drive


Hello everyone !

I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.

Un abrazo desde Perú

Thank you !

Nicolas Detiffe 

Cel: 0051970972650


Hugh McLaughlin
 

Rocket stoves are intended to use less fuel and emit less pollutants, but they are not intended to produce biochar of consistent quality. The biochar option is better served by "TLUD" stoves. The website http://www.drtlud.com has a wealth of information about biochar making stoves.

- Hugh McLaughlin

On Saturday, October 17, 2020, 7:26:33 PM EDT, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:


plan estufa israel.pdf

PDF  a través de  Google Drive


Hello everyone !

I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.

Un abrazo desde Perú

Thank you !

Nicolas Detiffe 

Cel: 0051970972650


Trevor Richards
 

Are there not versions where the annular space is used as a retort?


On Sun, 18 Oct 2020 at 12:59, Hugh McLaughlin via groups.io <wastemin1=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Rocket stoves are intended to use less fuel and emit less pollutants, but they are not intended to produce biochar of consistent quality. The biochar option is better served by "TLUD" stoves. The website http://www.drtlud.com has a wealth of information about biochar making stoves.

- Hugh McLaughlin

On Saturday, October 17, 2020, 7:26:33 PM EDT, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n=yahoo.fr@groups.io> wrote:


plan estufa israel.pdf

PDF  a través de  Google Drive


Hello everyone !

I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.

Un abrazo desde Perú

Thank you !

Nicolas Detiffe 

Cel: 0051970972650


Paul S Anderson
 

Nicolas,

 

Based on the drawings, I do not see how this stove design would be a good produced of biochar.   I am not sure that it is a good example of a Rocket stove.    Have you seen it is use?   Are there more reports about it?

 

If you send more information about your project and situation, I and others might be able to assist regarding a TLUD stove for cooking and biochar.   If interested, you need to  send info about your fuel supply and your project location and about arrangements for stove production.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of detiffe nicolas via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 17, 2020 6:26 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

 

Hello everyone !
 
I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.
 
Un abrazo desde Perú
 
Thank you !


Nicolas Detiffe 


Cel: 0051970972650


Kirk Harris
 

Detiffe,

Thank you for sharing your ideas and the drawings.  They are easy to understand, which is nice.  Making quality char with a rocket stove is challenging, and you are a daring person to give it a try.

Hugh is correct that TLUDs make better, more consistent char.  If you really want to make char with a rocket stove because of fuel type or other reasons, these changes to your stove may help. 

Rocket stoves are preferably insulated around the combustion area.

Experiment with adding a raised floor to the area where the sticks are pushed into the stove to provide under fire air.  This is how Rocket stoves are designed.  This is intended to burn more char and may reduce char output, so experimenting is appropriate.

Make the portion of the vertical chamber below the fire deeper to hold more char.  I assume that you are wanting the char to fall into this section to be saved.

Remove the holes on the bottom.  They let in air to burn the char rather than save it.

Design a way of removing and cooling the char without having to put out the fire.  Perhaps set the stove on an air proof container such that the char falls into the container.  The stove can be moved to a second container when the first is full.  A lid on the first container can let the char cool without burning. 

Some way of scraping the char off of the burning sticks before it burns and letting it fall into the container might increase char yield (?).  Perhaps the corners where the horizontal chamber meets the vertical chamber can provide such a place where the sticks can be scraped.  Also a way to break off the charred ends of the sticks so they can fall into the container might help.

Trevor's suggestion to make the rocket stove heat an annular retort is good, though it might be more complex to build, load, and operate.  The heat in the riser section of a rocket stove is not evenly distributed, so the retort may be hotter on the back side of the stove than on the front side.  The gas from the retort can be directed through holes at its bottom into the combustion chamber and burned.  Perhaps once this gets started, it will be self sustaining and the rocket flame can be extinguished or lessened (?).  When the fire is first started, much of the heat will be going into the retort, so cooking heat will be limited for a while.  It may take several hours to complete the charring process.

These are all brain storming ideas and are untested by me.

Wishing you well with this idea, or if you choose to a use a TLUD or kiln.

Kirk H.

On 10/17/2020 4:26 PM, detiffe nicolas via groups.io wrote:

plan estufa israel.pdf

PDF  a través de  Google Drive


Hello everyone !

I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.

Un abrazo desde Perú

Thank you !

Nicolas Detiffe 

Cel: 0051970972650

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Daniel Pidgeon
 

Detiffe,

Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the holes in the bottom, correct?

If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.

I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed, the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up, and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.

The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.

But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current projects.

Daniel

On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...> wrote:

Detiffe


Paul S Anderson
 

Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an Anila stove. Check it our with a Internet search. Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious making of biochar. It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center. And it is not a particularly good cookstove. Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website: www.drtlud.com
Email: psanders@... Skype: paultlud
Phone: Office: 309-452-7072 Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy: See www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]

Detiffe,

Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
holes in the bottom, correct?

If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.

I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.

The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.

But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
projects.

Daniel
On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
wrote:

Detiffe



 

Nicolas (may have incorrect address above) and list:  cc Kevin, Kirk, Andrew

1.  This is to first acknowledge the half-dozen earlier responses, mostly noting that you are designing a stove known as an Anila (and no relationship to TLUDs). 

 I can’t see anything wrong with any of your design choices (heights, diameters, hole sizes, etc.)  You might want to try several different main-retort outer diameters if you are driving for more thermal output or more char.

2.  I also have recently thought a little about a design like yours.  This is to provide a data dump on what I learned (which is not that much - no back up for anything below).  I never found any detailed (efficiencies, pollutant levels, char characteristics, etc.) test results.  My limited experience is heavily influenced by working with Kevin McLean  (cc’d) - who limits his interest to stoves costing only a few $.  His now called AGWAs - and going pretty well.  The comments below mostly based on recent interactions with Kevin.

3.  The best past source could be work done by a talented group at Cornell under Professor Johannes Lehmann- especially in Kenya.  They have reported on the use of the biochar, not on the stove itself - so I won’t try sending more on that.  I have one drawing of one considerably bigger than yours coming from (Australian)  Dr. Stephen Joseph.  But I have. no details on its performance either.

4.  I think you will find one difficulty is keeping it sufficiently tightly sealed.  Like you,  Stephen loaded at the bottom and tipped it over for operation.  I believe many other Anilas were loaded at the top - and sealed with sand.  My thought was to load from the top with a flat plate over a relatively small hole.  This would require an off-center main flame column.   

5.  With fuel loading at the bottom, you might be able to seal well with a small layer of water in a shallow pan.

6.  You might get a cheaper final stove by eliminating the side entry.  The fuel/combustion part of the Rocket could be below - between several bricks (just to lower the cost of the stove)..

7.  I hope you will try some tests without the added “holey” top section.  Those holes will certainly improve the combustion, but Rockets usually have plenty of air anyway.  Might instead try adding a skirt - to achieve higher efficiency (10-15%??) at acceptable added cost .

8.   The other respondents all emphasized TLUDs - assuming as I do, that you want char.  Then the question is whether the Rocket could be replaced by a TLUD.  My thinking is - not so easily. A big advantage of TLUDs is being able to control power level - but the outer “Anila” cavity will do its own thing.  Control for cooking has to be with the cook and the pot size and allowable temperatures. (Heating water may be ideal.)  The Anila can be run for hours when coupled with a Rocket.
There is a chance that you could design a unit where you somehow replaced an interior TLUD contents - but I can’t think of an easy way to do that.
One important point of the operation you will notice is that there is a runaway, uncontrollable phase where the interior reactions are exothermic. (I think between maybe 250 and 350 C).  The released gases can do a good job of heating other still low-temperature material - if not packed too tightly.

9.   I was pleased to see your company has the right kind of background to handle this task.  Can you explain the “Israel” part of this stove name?  

We hear very little from South America (Peru included) because of the strong emphasis on plancha type stoves.  Kirk Harris (cc’d) now has some ideas there for TLUDs.  Kirk has produced the TLUD stoves with the best measured test results (Tier 5)

Hope some of this helps - but my guess is that you already knew a lot of this, given your company’s background.   All of us who have responded look forward to knowing your stove design had a successful biochar orientation.  There is a sister “stoves” list which could also be involved. Let us know if that might be a help. (I have added that list’s moderator - Andrew Heggie - to see if he has more ideas on this very important topic.)

Good luck.

Ron




On Oct 17, 2020, at 5:26 PM, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

plan estufa israel.pdf

PDF  a través de  Google Drive


Hello everyone !

I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.

Un abrazo desde Perú

Thank you !

Nicolas Detiffe 

Cel: 0051970972650


Albert Bates
 

These are some studies Cornell's Dorisel Torres-Rojas made in Kenya:

Deng, L., Torres-Rojas, D., Burford, M., Whitlow, T. H., Lehmann, J., & Fisher, E. M. (2018). Fuel sensitivity of biomass cookstove performance. Applied Energy, 215, 13-20. In this study, a pyrolysis biomass cookstove with separate combustion and pyrolysis chambers (two-chamber stove) is investigated and compared to a widely-used char producing cookstove design (top-lit updraft, TLUD).

Torres-Rojas, D., Deng, L., Shannon, L., Fisher, E. M., Joseph, S., & Lehmann, J. (2019). Carbon and nitrogen emissions rates and heat transfer of an indirect pyrolysis biomass cookstove. Biomass and Bioenergy, 127, 105279. PDF: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953419302284

Torres-Rojas, D., Lehmann, J., Hobbs, P., Joseph, S., & Neufeldt, H. (2011). Biomass availability, energy consumption and biochar production in rural households of Western Kenya. biomass and bioenergy, 35(8), 3537-3546.  PDF: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0961953411002583

On 10/18/20 2:01 PM, Ron Larson wrote:
Nicolas (may have incorrect address above) and list:  cc Kevin, Kirk, Andrew

1.  This is to first acknowledge the half-dozen earlier responses, mostly noting that you are designing a stove known as an Anila (and no relationship to TLUDs). 

 I can’t see anything wrong with any of your design choices (heights, diameters, hole sizes, etc.)  You might want to try several different main-retort outer diameters if you are driving for more thermal output or more char.

2.  I also have recently thought a little about a design like yours.  This is to provide a data dump on what I learned (which is not that much - no back up for anything below).  I never found any detailed (efficiencies, pollutant levels, char characteristics, etc.) test results.  My limited experience is heavily influenced by working with Kevin McLean  (cc’d) - who limits his interest to stoves costing only a few $.  His now called AGWAs - and going pretty well.  The comments below mostly based on recent interactions with Kevin.

3.  The best past source could be work done by a talented group at Cornell under Professor Johannes Lehmann- especially in Kenya.  They have reported on the use of the biochar, not on the stove itself - so I won’t try sending more on that.  I have one drawing of one considerably bigger than yours coming from (Australian)  Dr. Stephen Joseph.  But I have. no details on its performance either.

4.  I think you will find one difficulty is keeping it sufficiently tightly sealed.  Like you,  Stephen loaded at the bottom and tipped it over for operation.  I believe many other Anilas were loaded at the top - and sealed with sand.  My thought was to load from the top with a flat plate over a relatively small hole.  This would require an off-center main flame column.   

5.  With fuel loading at the bottom, you might be able to seal well with a small layer of water in a shallow pan.

6.  You might get a cheaper final stove by eliminating the side entry.  The fuel/combustion part of the Rocket could be below - between several bricks (just to lower the cost of the stove)..

7.  I hope you will try some tests without the added “holey” top section.  Those holes will certainly improve the combustion, but Rockets usually have plenty of air anyway.  Might instead try adding a skirt - to achieve higher efficiency (10-15%??) at acceptable added cost .

8.   The other respondents all emphasized TLUDs - assuming as I do, that you want char.  Then the question is whether the Rocket could be replaced by a TLUD.  My thinking is - not so easily. A big advantage of TLUDs is being able to control power level - but the outer “Anila” cavity will do its own thing.  Control for cooking has to be with the cook and the pot size and allowable temperatures. (Heating water may be ideal.)  The Anila can be run for hours when coupled with a Rocket.
There is a chance that you could design a unit where you somehow replaced an interior TLUD contents - but I can’t think of an easy way to do that.
One important point of the operation you will notice is that there is a runaway, uncontrollable phase where the interior reactions are exothermic. (I think between maybe 250 and 350 C).  The released gases can do a good job of heating other still low-temperature material - if not packed too tightly.

9.   I was pleased to see your company has the right kind of background to handle this task.  Can you explain the “Israel” part of this stove name?  

We hear very little from South America (Peru included) because of the strong emphasis on plancha type stoves.  Kirk Harris (cc’d) now has some ideas there for TLUDs.  Kirk has produced the TLUD stoves with the best measured test results (Tier 5)

Hope some of this helps - but my guess is that you already knew a lot of this, given your company’s background.   All of us who have responded look forward to knowing your stove design had a successful biochar orientation.  There is a sister “stoves” list which could also be involved. Let us know if that might be a help. (I have added that list’s moderator - Andrew Heggie - to see if he has more ideas on this very important topic.)

Good luck.

Ron




On Oct 17, 2020, at 5:26 PM, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

plan estufa israel.pdf

PDF  a través de  Google Drive


Hello everyone !

I would like your opinion on this model of forest biochar rocket stove to produce biochar on a small scale and be able to cook.

Un abrazo desde Perú

Thank you !

Nicolas Detiffe 

Cel: 0051970972650


--
BURN: Using Fire to Cool the Earth

Global Village Institute for Appropriate Technology
Summertown TN 38483-0090


detiffe nicolas
 

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>







Daniel Pidgeon
 

Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


detiffe nicolas
 

Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


Daniel Pidgeon
 

Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


Kevin McLean
 

Thanks, Daniel.  Here is a summary of the rock bed project.  Rock beds are free, simple and cut firewood usage by a third.  Millions of African families are using rock beds in their three stone cookstoves.

We've also designed a $2 TLUD called the Agwa.  It burns agricultural waste and makes biochar.

Kevin

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 9:34 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n=yahoo.fr@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


Kevin McLean
 

It was pointed out that my link to the AgWa was wrong.  Sorry.  Here is the correct link to the AgWa:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vi2DU_dYwMeY8TRHlz72d7Y8BrTb-OjhZGh5Tw7TMZs/edit?usp=sharing

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 2:53 PM K McLean <info@...> wrote:
Thanks, Daniel.  Here is a summary of the rock bed project.  Rock beds are free, simple and cut firewood usage by a third.  Millions of African families are using rock beds in their three stone cookstoves.

We've also designed a $2 TLUD called the Agwa.  It burns agricultural waste and makes biochar.

Kevin

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 9:34 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n=yahoo.fr@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>


detiffe nicolas
 

Hi Daniel and  Kevin, 

Very interesting the rock bed project and the Agwa, thank you for sharing !!

Nicolas

Le vendredi 23 octobre 2020 à 11:53:16 UTC−5, Kevin McLean <info@...> a écrit :


It was pointed out that my link to the AgWa was wrong.  Sorry.  Here is the correct link to the AgWa:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vi2DU_dYwMeY8TRHlz72d7Y8BrTb-OjhZGh5Tw7TMZs/edit?usp=sharing

On Thu, Oct 22, 2020 at 2:53 PM K McLean <info@...> wrote:
Thanks, Daniel.  Here is a summary of the rock bed project.  Rock beds are free, simple and cut firewood usage by a third.  Millions of African families are using rock beds in their three stone cookstoves.

We've also designed a $2 TLUD called the Agwa.  It burns agricultural waste and makes biochar.

Kevin

On Wed, Oct 21, 2020 at 9:34 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Hi Nicolas,

Gustavo Pena has posted on this group regarding his plancha. It looks good!


Regarding the minimal take-up of the stoves in your field trials, I like Kevin McLean's work with simply and cheaply tweaking existing used methods, using a bed of pebbles and a basic clay grate to get more air into the middle of the fire, making things more efficient and cleaner, at almost no cost. I looked for his posts on the group site, and the old site, but could not find them. This is a picture I found in an email of a set up that was created for demonstration, but that shows the simplicity of it. This is for a basic open fire, a three stone fire, but the concept of a grate to get more oxygen into the burn zone can be used on most, older style, wood fired cooking devices. With minimal changes to the user. One to keep in mind for the community at large, who are generally resistant to change...

Daniel

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n=yahoo.fr@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 20 October 2020 12:43 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>; main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
 
Hello Daniel !

Thank you very much for the information. I met Gustavo Peña 2 years ago in Peru and he shared his plans on the "TLUD plancha"
I had not heard of the FAB model .. is it possible to have more information ?

I will continue to research and test a forest biochar rocket!

We'll keep in touch

Saludos 

Nicolas 

Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 22:55:13 UTC−5, Daniel Pidgeon <bigbird886@...> a écrit :


Hi Nicolas,

First, apologies for calling you by your surname previously.

Also, for suggesting your stove looked similar to an “Anita” stove. Auto-correct didn’t know the word Anila, and changed it on me!

Stoves like Edward Revill’s pipe TLUD and Paul Anderson’s FAB Stove in Africa(I can’t remember which country) both have the adjustable fan unit and pot stand separate to the fuel chamber/primary combustion unit. These units can be made with two fuel chambers, so you can empty and refill one, while using the other, thus making the recharge a little smoother.

If you need multiple stoves, I recall watching somewhere a YouTube video on TLUD planchas. Or a two pot system.

Maybe you could also have the rocket stove there for the larger, longer cooking pot?

Thinking on the run...

Daniel 


On 19 Oct 2020, at 1:08 pm, detiffe nicolas via groups.io <detiffe_n@...> wrote:

Thank you very much for all your responses!

It is true that TLUD is the best way to produce biochar. 3 years ago

we contacted Art Donnelly and made a FINCA type TLUD running on cow dung: 




However, when we tested in the field, we had several criticisms: that traditional houses need 3 burners at the same time and that the kitchen has the capacity to operate several hours in particular for large stock pot kitchens.
They also told us that it was quite "complex" to turn on the TLUD and that it could not be recharged while it was working.

Since then I stopped working on this issue and I became interested in bioclimatic construction in adobe.
The pandemic was an impulsive factor and a month ago, I  bought with several friends of mine a piece of land in the Sacred Valley in Cusco PERU and we are building bioclimatic houses in adobe.
I started to build a rocket stove with clay and tiles to cook our meals: 




Several neighbors saw this rocket and were very interested in building it. Then I remembered Edward Revill and his videos on his biochar rocket stove. The use of biochar has a lot of potential because the soils in the area are very compact and poor (very clayey and rocky). In the valley there was a lot of deforestation and they planted many eucalyptus.

I did some more research and found that video from which I was inspired to make the plans I sent you: 




It is true that in the video it looks like a cut and I suspect that it was not as easy as it seems. Surely an isolation would help a lot. I planned to make it with mud and straw to save costs.

Personally, I am going to build a new TLUD like the "finca" model I think and I will incorporate a water heater (see annex) We did a test  3 years ago and it works quite well.

In summary:

- I am interested in the development of a stove that allows cooking and producing biochar (that can be recharged and ideally has 2 burners)

- Produce biochar on a medium scale with house construction waste (mainly eucalyptus)
Thank you very much again for your precious comments!

PS: Could you email: ndetiffe@... instead of detiffe_n@... and ndetiffe@...?


Le dimanche 18 octobre 2020 à 08:32:11 UTC−5, Paul S Anderson <psanders@...> a écrit :


Detiffe,

I thank Trevor and Kirk and Daniel for pointing out what I missed at first glance.

The stove is an    Anila stove.  Check it our with a Internet search.  Some of what you will fined is copied here, but the search will give you photos, etc.

&&&&&&
Anila stove
The stove was designed by Professor RV Ravikumar, of the University of Mysore in India, and it can produce biochar on a household level. It is a TLUD with a double chamber design, which produces biochar and does not allow the biochar to be fully combusted in the unit.

07c. The Anila Stove | Biochar Innovation
biocharinnovation.wordpress.com › 07-stove-designs 
Feedback

Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove | Improved Biomass Cooking ...
stoves.bioenergylists.org › anila
Jul 17, 2010 — Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove. Anila Biomass Gasifier Stove Designed and built by Professor U.N. Ravikumar (Eng) Mysore University, India In ...
Videos
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

In my opinion, forget about the Anila stove for serious  making of biochar.  It is an inside out retort with lots of external surface area to prevent the adequate heating to pyrolysis temperatures of the biomass that is too far from the heat source in the center.  And it is not a particularly good cookstove.    Maybe it is a learning tool to see what is important for making char and how not to do it.

Paul

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:  www.drtlud.com
        Email:  psanders@...      Skype:  paultlud
        Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434
Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 
Inventor of RoCC kilns for biochar and energy:  See  www.woodgas.com
Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)
        with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of
>>> Daniel Pidgeon via groups.io
>>> Sent: Sunday, October 18, 2020 7:39 AM
>>> To: main@biochar.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [Biochar] Forest biochar rocket stove
>>>
>>> [This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to
>>> abuse@...<mailto:abuse@...>]
>>>
>>> Detiffe,
>>>
>>> Your plans seem to have a removable base. If I understand correctly, this is
>>> more of a retort, filled with wood or chip, then heated by a rocket stove
>>> through the middle, with the gases being fed into the firebox through the
>>> holes in the bottom, correct?
>>>
>>> If so, Ed Reville in England posted videos on YouTube circa 2010, regarding a
>>> rocket hybrid, like this. Worth a watch. But for what it’s worth, he now
>>> works with TLUDs, what he calls a pipe TLUD. Again, worth a look.
>>>
>>> I built something similar, but larger, and found it needed to keep being fed,
>>> the gases weren’t enough to take over the burn completely. Mine was
>>> larger, so more difficult to unload charred sawdust, it tended to cake up,
>>> and not shake out easily. Further insulation is also a must.
>>>
>>> The Anita stove is a bit like a TLUD in the centre of a retort.
>>>
>>> But I have leaned toward building a pipe TLUD for one of my current
>>> projects.
>>>
>>> Daniel
>>> > On 18 Oct 2020, at 5:30 pm, Kirk Harris <gkharris316@...>
>>> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Detiffe
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>






<finca con espiral calentador de agua.jpeg>