Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal


Eli Fishpaw
 

Biochar Friends

Last November, I was successful at creating a cubic yard of charcoal via the flame cap trench method. This is pretty big time for a novice like myself.  However, I am still struggling with how to crush the charcoal into a powder.  I am convinced by an earlier discussion; this improves the biological potential of charcoal.  I purchased a grain grinder suggested off this list from Amazon, ABORON 3000W Electric Mill Grinder W/Switch Box Heavy Duty Commercial Electric Miller Dry Grinder 110V Cereals Corn Grain Coffee Wheat Feed Machine With Funnel. 

https://www.amazon.com/ABORON-Electric-Grinder-Commercial-Cereals/dp/B07WFP18F6/ref=pd_di_sccai_6/146-1781850-0216326?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B07WFP18F6&pd_rd_r=73fe5b65-5229-4b1a-bf05-a9758ccbcbf1&pd_rd_w=3psIW&pd_rd_wg=QbIBJ&pf_rd_p=e532f109-986a-4c2d-85fc-16555146f6b4&pf_rd_r=PVYZMTPNF879XVZ527XK&psc=1&refRID=PVYZMTPNF879XVZ527XK

When it did not work immediately, I put working with it on hold procrastinating until I really needed it.  As spring approaches, grass feedstock for my compost piles starts coming in.  I am wanting to use charcoal in compost this spring. 

I have not been able to get this to work effectively.  It seems very heavy duty.  However, the charcoal gets stuck in the cylinder leading to the rotating shaft with the ribs to carry charcoal to grinding plates.  If I poke at the charcoal with a screw driver, it can break up the log jamb and it will grind to a very satisfying output.  However, this requires a lot of fiddling.  I have to feed it slowly.  Yesterday when I renewed my effort to get this to work, one of the grinding plates mysteriously cracked.  I suspected a rock may have gotten in the mix, but did not find one.  I have another grinding plate to keep trying. 

 

This equipment did not have user manual.  It was designed for grains and not charcoal.  Can I make this work for charcoal?  What am I missing? 

Last year, I had mounted an electric push lawn mower upside down so open blades were on top.  I built a plywood box to serve as a hopper and another box to be a chute to direct powder into container.  With the motor running, I would feed charcoal slowly into hopper where it would effectively grind it.  I had to be careful not to add too much or the motor would wind down which is likely damaging to the motor.  However, at this point, that worked better than this grain grinder.  My hope was for this seed grinder to replace that setup which I have disassembled. 

If any on this list have experience with this kind of equipment being used to grind charcoal, please give me suggestions. 

Eli


Ben Discoe
 

Hi Eli,

I have also tried various grinders / shredders, and so far they have
all had problems as you describe. In particular, a typical wood
chipper / hammer mill produces a lot of dust, does not do well with
the occasional rock, and if you wet the char to reduce dust, then it
gums up with wet char mud. With a grain grinder as you describe, I
would expect exactly the sort of problems you encountered.

Personally, I am hoping to next try one of the following options for
unloading the char vessel and reducing the size:

1. A leaf shredder-vac, like the Stihl 86 C-E, around $300. The
impeller will surely wear out over time, but it's an easily replaced
part.
2. A more serious debris loader, like the Billy Goat DL1302H, around $2500.

I am expecting these to be less susceptible to jamming, because the
char is being pulled UP through an impeller, rather than down; gravity
and turbulence should cause the char to move around and jam less, and
rocks, being heavier, should fail to be lifted by the vacuum current.
I'd love to hear anyone's experience at actually using either of
these.

Good luck,
Ben
http://ahualoa.net/farmblog/category/biochar/

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:51 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@rockbridge.net> wrote:

Biochar Friends

Last November, I was successful at creating a cubic yard of charcoal via the flame cap trench method. This is pretty big time for a novice like myself. However, I am still struggling with how to crush the charcoal into a powder. I am convinced by an earlier discussion; this improves the biological potential of charcoal. I purchased a grain grinder suggested off this list from Amazon, ABORON 3000W Electric Mill Grinder W/Switch Box Heavy Duty Commercial Electric Miller Dry Grinder 110V Cereals Corn Grain Coffee Wheat Feed Machine With Funnel.

I have not been able to get this to work effectively. [..]

_._,_._,_


Stephen Joseph
 

HHi Guys

A simple plate/ jaw or cone crusher crusher where one of the surfaces is stationary and the other moves.  We use these in minerals processing and have used for charcoal with great results.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 7:54 AM Ben Discoe <bdiscoe@...> wrote:
Hi Eli,

I have also tried various grinders / shredders, and so far they have
all had problems as you describe.  In particular, a typical wood
chipper / hammer mill produces a lot of dust, does not do well with
the occasional rock, and if you wet the char to reduce dust, then it
gums up with wet char mud.  With a grain grinder as you describe, I
would expect exactly the sort of problems you encountered.

Personally, I am hoping to next try one of the following options for
unloading the char vessel and reducing the size:

1. A leaf shredder-vac, like the Stihl 86 C-E, around $300.  The
impeller will surely wear out over time, but it's an easily replaced
part.
2. A more serious debris loader, like the Billy Goat DL1302H, around $2500.

I am expecting these to be less susceptible to jamming, because the
char is being pulled UP through an impeller, rather than down; gravity
and turbulence should cause the char to move around and jam less, and
rocks, being heavier, should fail to be lifted by the vacuum current.
I'd love to hear anyone's experience at actually using either of
these.

Good luck,
Ben
http://ahualoa.net/farmblog/category/biochar/

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 6:51 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:
>
> Biochar Friends
>
> Last November, I was successful at creating a cubic yard of charcoal via the flame cap trench method. This is pretty big time for a novice like myself.  However, I am still struggling with how to crush the charcoal into a powder.  I am convinced by an earlier discussion; this improves the biological potential of charcoal.  I purchased a grain grinder suggested off this list from Amazon, ABORON 3000W Electric Mill Grinder W/Switch Box Heavy Duty Commercial Electric Miller Dry Grinder 110V Cereals Corn Grain Coffee Wheat Feed Machine With Funnel.
>
> I have not been able to get this to work effectively.  [..]
>
> _._,_._,_






Ben Discoe
 

Stephen,

Could you give a specific example - make and model? I would imagine
the grinder you describe would jam on a single rock, but if it is in
fact made to grind rocks, then that might not be the case.

-Ben

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 11:04 AM Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Guys

A simple plate/ jaw or cone crusher crusher where one of the surfaces is stationary and the other moves. We use these in minerals processing and have used for charcoal with great results.

Regards
Stephen


Stephen Joseph
 

Sorry ben

One of my colleagues made one but I cant find the image.  When i get time i will draw it up.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 8:23 AM Ben Discoe <bdiscoe@...> wrote:
Stephen,

Could you give a specific example - make and model?  I would imagine
the grinder you describe would jam on a single rock, but if it is in
fact made to grind rocks, then that might not be the case.

-Ben

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 11:04 AM Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Guys
>
> A simple plate/ jaw or cone crusher crusher where one of the surfaces is stationary and the other moves.  We use these in minerals processing and have used for charcoal with great results.
>
> Regards
> Stephen






Paul S Anderson
 

Stephan,

 

I and many others await your diagram of the charcoal crusher.

 

Paul

 

Doc / Dr TLUD / Paul S. Anderson, PhD --- Website:   www.drtlud.com

         Email:  psanders@...       Skype:   paultlud

         Phone:  Office: 309-452-7072    Mobile & WhatsApp: 309-531-4434

Exec. Dir. of Juntos Energy Solutions NFP    Go to: www.JuntosNFP.org 

Inventor of RoCC kilns and author of Biochar white paper :  See  www.woodgas.energy/resources  

Author of “A Capitalist Carol” (free digital copies at www.capitalism21.org)

         with pages 88 – 94 about solving the world crisis for clean cookstoves.

 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Joseph via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 3:50 PM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

 

[This message came from an external source. If suspicious, report to abuse@...]

Sorry ben

 

One of my colleagues made one but I cant find the image.  When i get time i will draw it up.

 

Regards

Stephen

 

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 8:23 AM Ben Discoe <bdiscoe@...> wrote:

Stephen,

Could you give a specific example - make and model?  I would imagine
the grinder you describe would jam on a single rock, but if it is in
fact made to grind rocks, then that might not be the case.

-Ben

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 11:04 AM Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Guys
>
> A simple plate/ jaw or cone crusher crusher where one of the surfaces is stationary and the other moves.  We use these in minerals processing and have used for charcoal with great results.
>
> Regards
> Stephen





Daniel Pidgeon
 

There are a few designs of crusher or flail talked about here;


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 8:50 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Sorry ben

One of my colleagues made one but I cant find the image.  When i get time i will draw it up.

Regards
Stephen

On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 8:23 AM Ben Discoe <bdiscoe@...> wrote:
Stephen,

Could you give a specific example - make and model?  I would imagine
the grinder you describe would jam on a single rock, but if it is in
fact made to grind rocks, then that might not be the case.

-Ben

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 11:04 AM Stephen Joseph <joey.stephen@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Guys
>
> A simple plate/ jaw or cone crusher crusher where one of the surfaces is stationary and the other moves.  We use these in minerals processing and have used for charcoal with great results.
>
> Regards
> Stephen






mikethewormguy
 

Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike


Daniel Pidgeon
 

Sorry Eli,

I just looked again at the conversation I posted about this morning, I didn't realise you had actually been part of that conversation a year ago.

I had liked the simplicity and dust control of the drill powered, reo and chain flail, through the lid of a 20 litre bucket. Although I cannot speak to its effectiveness or practicality.

Daniel


From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 9:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike


Joshua Bogart
 

I have done the flails on a drill which works well.
I have discussed grinders with several different machinists and engineers, and the consensus has been that most models will either wear rapidly or clog. 
My father, who is a machinist,  recommended with heavy non ferrous balls ( no sparks). 
 I did that with an old,  cement mixer with a couple of rocks, best done with moist charcoal to keep dust down.  That made a really good product.  
Currently I am placing charcoal on a piece of plywood and driving over it. Works good enough, and I am not using excess energy to get it done just my regular comings and goings. 

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021, 8:10 PM Daniel Pidgeon <daniel.pidgeon@...> wrote:
Sorry Eli,

I just looked again at the conversation I posted about this morning, I didn't realise you had actually been part of that conversation a year ago.

I had liked the simplicity and dust control of the drill powered, reo and chain flail, through the lid of a 20 litre bucket. Although I cannot speak to its effectiveness or practicality.

Daniel

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 9:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike


Stephen Joseph
 

No.  One variant is a cone crusher.  These plate crushers that my colleague made are a variation on this.



On Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 9:11 AM mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike


bajarobl
 

I’ve had great success with a garden chipper/grinder.
Soak the coarse char in water, spread garden shade cloth around the chipper outlet, and have a hose at hand.


Eli Fishpaw
 

I had set up the chain flail crusher in a 20gal pressure tank.  I was not satisfied with the results.  Perhaps that batch used was not as completely pyrolyzed.  This recent batch achieved high temperatures, therefore is more crushable.  I may try that again.  However, the upside down lawn mower described in earlier message was more effective with that first flame cap trench batch.  
 
Still looking for a solution.  Maybe it is beyond a novice to crush the charcoal.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Pidgeon [mailto:daniel.pidgeon@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 01:10:45 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

Sorry Eli,
 
I just looked again at the conversation I posted about this morning, I didn't realise you had actually been part of that conversation a year ago.
 
I had liked the simplicity and dust control of the drill powered, reo and chain flail, through the lid of a 20 litre bucket. Although I cannot speak to its effectiveness or practicality.
 
Daniel
 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 9:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike


Tom Nelson
 

All,

After some extensive research I have identified the proper equipment to both grind biochar and also to classify the char into very narrow particle distributions.

I may have the ability to offer toll biochar grinding and classification services late this year.

Is this something that biochar producers in the group have interest? What would you be willing to pay for a toll milling and classification service? The proper equipment is not cheap.

Tom Nelson




On Mar 12, 2021, at 10:48 AM, Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:


I had set up the chain flail crusher in a 20gal pressure tank.  I was not satisfied with the results.  Perhaps that batch used was not as completely pyrolyzed.  This recent batch achieved high temperatures, therefore is more crushable.  I may try that again.  However, the upside down lawn mower described in earlier message was more effective with that first flame cap trench batch.  
 
Still looking for a solution.  Maybe it is beyond a novice to crush the charcoal.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Pidgeon [mailto:daniel.pidgeon@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 01:10:45 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

Sorry Eli,
 
I just looked again at the conversation I posted about this morning, I didn't realise you had actually been part of that conversation a year ago.
 
I had liked the simplicity and dust control of the drill powered, reo and chain flail, through the lid of a 20 litre bucket. Although I cannot speak to its effectiveness or practicality.
 
Daniel
 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 9:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike


Eli Fishpaw
 

 
I wanted to let the list know that I have resolved my issue.  I made a new purchase of an electric shredder-chipper. 
This particular model had a hopper for loading and a box for receiving.  I like that the box is fairly tight, reducing but not eliminating the dust escaping.  Because the charcoal goes through a hole that limits the size of a branch, the intended use, the charcoal does not go down a shaft.  It worked like a charm out of the box. When the powdered charcoal filled up to the chute, the device did bind.  However, I was easily able to open and vacuum out and resume.  Knowing that limitation, I empty box more frequently, no problem.  
 
I did get the grain grinder to work, also.  To function properly I had to pour in the charcoal at exactly the same rate as the grinding output, occasionally poking into feed shaft to free log jambs.  It is best to clean out the machine of residue before starting.  It is much slower than the chipper shredder.  Although, it makes a finer powder than the chipper shredder.  It might be able to function fluidly if I put chipper output into grain grinder to get a finer powder.  However, the chipper makes a lot of powder, but it also results in tiny chips.  My thinking is that this is good enough.  
 
Finally, I can proceed with plans for making char compost. Roll on Terra Pretta.  
 
Thanks for input. 
 
Eli  


----- Original Message -----
From: Eli Fishpaw [mailto:belifishpaw@...]
To: <daniel.pidgeon@...>, <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 10:47:52 -0500
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

I had set up the chain flail crusher in a 20gal pressure tank.  I was not satisfied with the results.  Perhaps that batch used was not as completely pyrolyzed.  This recent batch achieved high temperatures, therefore is more crushable.  I may try that again.  However, the upside down lawn mower described in earlier message was more effective with that first flame cap trench batch.  
 
Still looking for a solution.  Maybe it is beyond a novice to crush the charcoal.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Pidgeon [mailto:daniel.pidgeon@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 01:10:45 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

Sorry Eli,
 
I just looked again at the conversation I posted about this morning, I didn't realise you had actually been part of that conversation a year ago.
 
I had liked the simplicity and dust control of the drill powered, reo and chain flail, through the lid of a 20 litre bucket. Although I cannot speak to its effectiveness or practicality.
 
Daniel
 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy@...>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 9:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike
 


 

Hello Eli
Your findings are quite similar to some of my experience.  I have enabled my grain grinder without making dust.  I built a Kon tiki last fall.  So I found that a big trick is to snuff out the coals.  I made a loose fitting metal sheet that drops right inside after flattening the pile out slightly.  Then I have strips of throw out sheets soaking wet, which I lay around the edges for a seal.  I moisten that some more.  In a couple of hours I check, that it's not burning, and drop in some water as/if needed.  The next day, I lift off the rings and spread the coals.  There are smoky hotspots that can be moistened until extinguished.   I spread 4 to 5 inch thick layer and moisten that too.  I do that so that all the biochar has been visited.  So extinguishing is an ordeal, but you will know when its complete.  I feel it for heat. 
     Next, I found the moisture content to be just right for grinding.  Yes I have to do some poking in the hopper, and the odd outlet cleanout, but it's not a problem.  I smush a few large pieces with a shovel. I can produce 1/2 yard of finished sellable char to put back on the Earth's surface.  This can happen in about a three hour burn.  I consider this good volume production.  My "burner" is two heavy guage sheet metal 8 feet long X 44 inches high, to make a 5 ft circle.
      It's just incredible how we can burn with such minimal smoke emissions.  Amazing!    Hope this concurs somewhat. 

Cheers
David
       




David R Derbowka             Chief Executive Officer

Passive Remediation Systems Ltd.
Tel: +1 250 306 6377 | 
eMail: david.derbowka@... |Web: prsi.ca |



On Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 7:29 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:
 
I wanted to let the list know that I have resolved my issue.  I made a new purchase of an electric shredder-chipper. 
This particular model had a hopper for loading and a box for receiving.  I like that the box is fairly tight, reducing but not eliminating the dust escaping.  Because the charcoal goes through a hole that limits the size of a branch, the intended use, the charcoal does not go down a shaft.  It worked like a charm out of the box. When the powdered charcoal filled up to the chute, the device did bind.  However, I was easily able to open and vacuum out and resume.  Knowing that limitation, I empty box more frequently, no problem.  
 
I did get the grain grinder to work, also.  To function properly I had to pour in the charcoal at exactly the same rate as the grinding output, occasionally poking into feed shaft to free log jambs.  It is best to clean out the machine of residue before starting.  It is much slower than the chipper shredder.  Although, it makes a finer powder than the chipper shredder.  It might be able to function fluidly if I put chipper output into grain grinder to get a finer powder.  However, the chipper makes a lot of powder, but it also results in tiny chips.  My thinking is that this is good enough.  
 
Finally, I can proceed with plans for making char compost. Roll on Terra Pretta.  
 
Thanks for input. 
 
Eli  


----- Original Message -----
From: Eli Fishpaw [mailto:belifishpaw@...]
To: <daniel.pidgeon@...>, <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 10:47:52 -0500
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

I had set up the chain flail crusher in a 20gal pressure tank.  I was not satisfied with the results.  Perhaps that batch used was not as completely pyrolyzed.  This recent batch achieved high temperatures, therefore is more crushable.  I may try that again.  However, the upside down lawn mower described in earlier message was more effective with that first flame cap trench batch.  
 
Still looking for a solution.  Maybe it is beyond a novice to crush the charcoal.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Daniel Pidgeon [mailto:daniel.pidgeon@...]
To: "main@Biochar.groups.io" <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 12 Mar 2021 01:10:45 +0000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

Sorry Eli,
 
I just looked again at the conversation I posted about this morning, I didn't realise you had actually been part of that conversation a year ago.
 
I had liked the simplicity and dust control of the drill powered, reo and chain flail, through the lid of a 20 litre bucket. Although I cannot speak to its effectiveness or practicality.
 
Daniel
 

From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> on behalf of mikethewormguy via groups.io <mikethewormguy=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, 12 March 2021 9:11 AM
To: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal
 
Stephen,

Are you describing a hammer mill... ?

Mike
 


Ben Discoe
 

Eli,

I am happy it worked for you. However, I tried an almost identical
electric shredder, and had nothing but trouble with it - frequent
jamming in particular, regardless of the moisture level of the char.
Each time it jammed, I had to open up the compartment with the blade
(which was difficult), clear it, then it had to be closed very firmly
(even more difficult, especially after char dust got everwhere) or it
would not start.

The other reason an electric shredded didn't fit my needs is that my
flame-cap char pits are on a part of my farm without electricity; it
would take a lot of extra work to move the char over to where I could
plug in a shredder.

My hope remains with the leaf vac / debris loader options. I have
heard anecdotal mentions of them on this list before, but I'm really
hoping that someone can step forward and describe their experience in
detail.

-Ben

On Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 4:29 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@rockbridge.net> wrote:


I wanted to let the list know that I have resolved my issue. I made a new purchase of an electric shredder-chipper.
https://www.chippersdirect.com/Earthwise-GS70015-Chipper-Shredder/p16875.html
This particular model had a hopper for loading and a box for receiving. I like that the box is fairly tight, reducing but not eliminating the dust escaping. Because the charcoal goes through a hole that limits the size of a branch, the intended use, the charcoal does not go down a shaft. It worked like a charm out of the box. When the powdered charcoal filled up to the chute, the device did bind. However, I was easily able to open and vacuum out and resume. Knowing that limitation, I empty box more frequently, no problem.


Frank Strie
 

This 6 Hp petrol Mulcher-Shredder from MASPORT (~AUD$ 1,200.-)  is what we use very satisfactorily / for some years now to efficiently crush wet and moist char from our KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kilns.
https://youtu.be/VzJQgVQWkFE?t=151
No matter if the Biochar was flood quenched in the kiln (from below) with either clean water (for clean char) or with say a thick soup like pig manure slurry by gravity from a 1m3 tank.
Provided the operator takes some “logical common sense” and uses the cross bar grate rather than the round hole grate that is prone to block too much.
After the multiple swinging  hammer blades have worn down somewhat and the biochar is getting too coarse, you may replace the bar grate with the round hole one … It works well down here in Tasmania and very soon also in Far North Queensland.
Obviously trommel sieves are also good options to provide various sizes according to customer needs and expectations.
Best regards
Frank again



Regulates the feed in speed

 

-----Original Message-----
From: main@Biochar.groups.io <main@Biochar.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ben Discoe
Sent: Saturday, March 20, 2021 7:02 PM
To: main@biochar.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

 

Eli,

 

I am happy it worked for you.  However, I tried an almost identical electric shredder, and had nothing but trouble with it - frequent jamming in particular, regardless of the moisture level of the char.

Each time it jammed, I had to open up the compartment with the blade (which was difficult), clear it, then it had to be closed very firmly (even more difficult, especially after char dust got everwhere) or it would not start.

 

The other reason an electric shredded didn't fit my needs is that my flame-cap char pits are on a part of my farm without electricity; it would take a lot of extra work to move the char over to where I could plug in a shredder.

 

My hope remains with the leaf vac / debris loader options.  I have heard anecdotal mentions of them on this list before, but I'm really hoping that someone can step forward and describe their experience in detail.

 

-Ben

 

On Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 4:29 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:

> I wanted to let the list know that I have resolved my issue.  I made a new purchase of an electric shredder-chipper.

> https://www.chippersdirect.com/Earthwise-GS70015-Chipper-Shredder/p168

> 75.html This particular model had a hopper for loading and a box for

> receiving.  I like that the box is fairly tight, reducing but not eliminating the dust escaping.  Because the charcoal goes through a hole that limits the size of a branch, the intended use, the charcoal does not go down a shaft.  It worked like a charm out of the box. When the powdered charcoal filled up to the chute, the device did bind.  However, I was easily able to open and vacuum out and resume.  Knowing that limitation, I empty box more frequently, no problem.

 

 

 

 


Eli Fishpaw
 

Ben
 
My charcoal also was produced in flame capped trench method.  At the end of the burn, I dowsed it with enough water to kill the flames.  However, down below I knew that embers still burned.  To reduce the amount of water that would be needed to kill all the embers, the pile was cool enough for me to fill 31g metal trash cans with tight lids to snuff out the fire.  Coming back the next day, the volume in cans had not reduced, therefore it worked.  This reduced use of water makes the charcoal less dusty when ground, but not so much that it goops up the grinder.  I am able to pull a electric chord to pit.  However, it was not much effort to carry cans of char to a nearby shed to do the grinding.  
 
I am sorry you had such trouble with the chipper shredder.  My experience with this equipment is still brief.  The problems you describe are more common with the grain grinder I have been using.  I think water content might be the key.  New equipment has the advantage of sharp blades.  I have not gone through the service cycle of sharpening the blades.  This is another bet on my part.  Time and use will tell me if I have similar problems.  
 
Eli 


----- Original Message -----
From: Ben Discoe [mailto:bdiscoe@...]
To: <main@biochar.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, 19 Mar 2021 22:01:39 -1000
Subject: Re: [Biochar] Help getting Grain Grinder to Grind Charcoal

Eli,

I am happy it worked for you.  However, I tried an almost identical
electric shredder, and had nothing but trouble with it - frequent
jamming in particular, regardless of the moisture level of the char.
Each time it jammed, I had to open up the compartment with the blade
(which was difficult), clear it, then it had to be closed very firmly
(even more difficult, especially after char dust got everwhere) or it
would not start.

The other reason an electric shredded didn't fit my needs is that my
flame-cap char pits are on a part of my farm without electricity; it
would take a lot of extra work to move the char over to where I could
plug in a shredder.

My hope remains with the leaf vac / debris loader options.  I have
heard anecdotal mentions of them on this list before, but I'm really
hoping that someone can step forward and describe their experience in
detail.

-Ben

On Fri, Mar 19, 2021 at 4:29 AM Eli Fishpaw <belifishpaw@...> wrote:
>
>
> I wanted to let the list know that I have resolved my issue.  I made a new purchase of an electric shredder-chipper.
> https://www.chippersdirect.com/Earthwise-GS70015-Chipper-Shredder/p16875.html
> This particular model had a hopper for loading and a box for receiving.  I like that the box is fairly tight, reducing but not eliminating the dust escaping.  Because the charcoal goes through a hole that limits the size of a branch, the intended use, the charcoal does not go down a shaft.  It worked like a charm out of the box. When the powdered charcoal filled up to the chute, the device did bind.  However, I was easily able to open and vacuum out and resume.  Knowing that limitation, I empty box more frequently, no problem.




Geoff Thomas
 

Hi Frank, could you see a possibility of running one of those with an electric motor?

On 20 Mar 2021, at 8:02 pm, Frank Strie <frank.strie@...> wrote:

This 6 Hp petrol Mulcher-Shredder from MASPORT (~AUD$ 1,200.-)  is what we use very satisfactorily / for some years now to efficiently crush wet and moist char from our KON-TIKI-TAS deep cone kilns.
https://youtu.be/VzJQgVQWkFE?t=151 
No matter if the Biochar was flood quenched in the kiln (from below) with either clean water (for clean char) or with say a thick soup like pig manure slurry by gravity from a 1m3 tank. 
Provided the operator takes some “logical common sense” and uses the cross bar grate rather than the round hole grate that is prone to block too much. 
After the multiple swinging  hammer blades have worn down somewhat and the biochar is getting too coarse, you may replace the bar grate with the round hole one … It works well down here in Tasmania and very soon also in Far North Queensland.
Obviously trommel sieves are also good options to provide various sizes according to customer needs and expectations. 
Best regards
Frank again